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Full text of "The pioneer"

swa 1 1 '0' . is 



THE 



PIONEER. 



COMPILED BY 

SAMUEL HARDEN, 

OF ANDERSON, INDIANA. 



PUBLISHER OF 

"Early Times in Boone County, Ind.," "History 

OF Madison County, Ind.," "Those I 

Have Met," "Pioneer," Etc. 



GREENFIELD. INDIANA. 

WILLIAM MITCHELL PRINTING COMPANY. 
1895. 






This Volume 



IS 



Respectfully Dedicated 

TO THE 

Pioneers of Madisox and Hancock Counties, 
Indiana. 

f 4^ 




SAMUEL HARDEN, Anderson, Ind. 



THE OLD-TIME FIRE. 



" Talk about ver buildin's 

That's het up hy steam — 
Give me the old oak fire 

Where the old folks used to dream. 

"The ricketj dog-irons. 

One-sided as could be ; 
The ashes banked with 'taters 

That was roastin' there fer me. 

" The dog on one side, drowsin', 

Or barkin' near the door ; 
The kitten cuttin' capers 

With the knittin' on the floor. 

" An' me a little tow head 
By mammy's side at night ; 

With both my cheeks a-burnin' 
From the red flames leapin' bright. 

" These steam-het buildin's make me 

Jest weary fer the blaze 
That was heap more comfortable 

In my childhood's nights and days. 

" An' I'd give the finest heater 
In the buildin's het by steam 

Fer the old-time chimbley corner 
Where the old folks used to dream. 



PREFACE. 



The object of this book is to recall to memory the 
pioneers of Madison and Hancock counties, Indiana. 
Among the shuffled cards of time they have been, to some 
extent, overlooked and forgotten. It will be the present 
aim to gather up the names and reminiscences of those 
who first settled in our now grand counties. 

It is now about seventy-live years since the first white 
man settled here. During this period many names have 
been lost, but, as far as possible, they will be hunted up. 
We can not afford to lose sight of those who had the cour- 
age to come and pitch their tents in these woods, with no 
roads, no mills, no neighbors, no school-houses — in fact, 
with nothing but the wild forests that surrounded them on 
every hand. 

The year 1818 witnessed the advent of this noble 
band on Fall Creek, near the Falls, and later at Anderson. 
At the latter place was an Indian village, where the natives 
had cultivated, in their rude way, some land along White 
River, and where they remained till about the year 1834, 
when, relinquishing their rights by purchase, they went 
further west toward the setting sun. About this time 
immigrants began to arrive quite numerousl}', and to settle 
at Perkinsville and on Pipe Creek and in other parts of the 
county. 

What disadvantages and what hardships our pioneers 
endured will never be fully told. We shall never know by 
experience what they went through, for those times are 
past, never to return ; but we know in part. They have 
told their children and grandchildren the old, old story of 



6 PREFACE. 

their struggles, and we have listened around the blazing 
fire of wood, or gas, half wondering, half doubting, the 
interesting recital. We have listened till we could almost 
see the strutting wild turkey and the rushing, panting deer, 
or hear the ax resounding in the deep woods and the howl 
of wolves. 

In the course of time, by degrees, the fields widened 
oat, roads were cut, school-houses and mills were built. 
Settlers came in from Virginia, North Carolina, Kentucky, 
Ohio, Pennsylvania and elsewhere. The transition from 
the green woods to our well cultivated fields of 1895 did 
not come at once, nor without labor and patience. Grad- 
ually we have gained the proud position we occupy to-day. 
As we sit b}' the polished gas stove and look out on such 
grand achievements, we sometimes wonder if we are 
dreaming. If these achievements, wrought within the 
memory of some living with us to-da}', are a wonder to us, 
what must they be to the pioreers who opened the road 
and saw the whole transformation ! 

No, we shall never fully know who were all the actors, 
what they underwent, and what became of them, ^-et it is 
our privilege, j-es, our duty, to gather much knowledge of 
pioneer life and to profit by it. It is only by contrasting 
the past with the present that we can properly appreciate 
the vast strides our community has taken during the 
sevent3^-five eventful years of its history. 

The aim of this little book, therefore, is to notice the 
more active men and women of our county. Gladly would 
I give the names of all the pioneers and their noteworthy 
deeds, but, in so small a w^ork, this will be out of the ques- 
tion. Brief and imperfect as the effort is, I trust that it 
may be a step in the right direction, and taken sufficiently 
early to secure man}^ names before they are lost forever. 

It will be sometimes difficult to decide who were, and 
who are, truly, pioneers of the county. The line must be 
drawn somewhere, and at some definite time. I have 



PREFACE. 



decided, therefore, to make the year 1840 the dividing line. 
This year of "log cabins and hard cider" was a memora- 
ble one in the history of our county. It will be understood, 
then, that all persons settling in the county previous to 
1840 will here be recognized as pioneers. 

This arrangement does not, of course, underrate those 
who came afterwards, and who have contributed greatly to 
the development of our resources. Ever since the gas era 
opened, in 1887, vast capital has rushed into the county, 
and to-day the spirit of progress goes marching on. So 
the old and the new shake hands over the achievements of 
the past and the hopes of the future. 



OLD SETTLERS' MEETINGS. 



The custom of holding old settlers' meetings, inaugu- 
rated in Eastern Indiana, and many other parts of the 
country, linally reached Madison county, nearly forty years 
ago, and has been kept up, with long intermissions. The 
first one of these of which we have any account was held 
between Pendleton and Huntsville, perhaps in 1856. It 
was fairly attended, and a number of old settlers were 
present. Among those present and taking part I call to 
mind the following: John H. Cook, Dr. Ward Cook, 
Adam Dobson, John Markle, David Cattron, Morris Gil- 
more, William and Thomas Silver, Martin Chapman, E. 
O. Chapman, Wm. Roach, Samuel D. Irish, John Tilson, 
O. B. Shaul, " Coon" Crossle}^ John Boston, Geo. Pavy, 
Isaac Busby, John Goul, Henry Goul, P. R. Maul, Col. 
Johnson, N. Hardy, George Pavy, Theodore Walker, B. 
F. Gregory, Andrew Shanklin, A. B. Taylor, Jacob Tay- 
lor, Elijah Williams, George Nicholson, Geo. R. Booram, 
and A. B. Carroll. The wives of some of these were 
present, and there were many others whose names I can 
not call to mind. No record of the meeting having been 
kept, I write from memory only. 

I had then been in the county only one year. This 
was the first meeting of the kind I had ever attended, and 
it made a deep and lasting impression on my mind. Many 
of the persons named above, whom I learned afterwards to 
respect and love, I first met at this meeting. 

Here was my first acquaintance with the late John H. 
Cook, who was foremost on this occasion. He was a born 
leader, and would be distinguished in any crowd. 



OLD SETTLERS MEETINGS. 9 

In contrast witli his disposition is that of his brother, 
Dr. Ward Cook, a retiring- man, without self-assertion, 
whose true worth will never be known. Now grown gray 
and palsied in his protession, he is still strongly attached 
to his old friends, who delight to do him honor, and all 
who know him honor and love him. 

At this meeting I first met John Markle, who after- 
wards became m}^ familiar acquaintance, and for years my 
near neighbor. Strongly devoted to his friends, he hated 
his enemies as few men could hate. He settled, as a pio- 
neer of Madison county, near Huntsville, in 1823, and 
served as a member of one of the first juries formed in the 
count3% He reared a large family. He died at Markle- 
ville, December 18, 1866, and was buried in the McAllister 
cemeter}'. 

I think I formed an acquaintance of Morris Gilmore at 
this meeting, and it continued, with delight to me, till his 
death, in 1879. ^^^^ father, Hugh Gilmore, settled, in 1828, 
in Adams township, just east of New Columbus, on the 
south bank of Fall Creek. Here, at the same time, came 
Morris, and near by, he, his wdfe, and other members of 
the Gilmore family, are buried. 

Adam Dobson was at this meeting, in the noonday of 
lite. His noon came late. Born, in Virginia, in 1796, he 
is yet living, with his daughter, Mrs. Rodgers, two miles 
south-west of Pendleton. He came into the vicinity of 
Pendleton in 1828, has lived in the county sixty-six years, 
and has been tor 3'ears a member of the M. E. Church. 

Since the above was written, Mr. D. died, November, 
1S94, and was buried at Pendleton. 

William Roach was there, for he never missed an old 
settlers' meeting, if health would permit his attendance. 
Rain and storm did not deter him trom attending such a 
meeting, or the funeral of a friend. Oh, how we all loved 
him, and delighted to hear his stories of early life in tha 
county I He was born in Ohio in 1809, came to Madison 



lO OLD SETTLERS MEETINCiS. 

county in 1832, located at Huntsville, and lived in the 
county till the time of his death in 1893. He and his wife 
are buried in Huntsville cemetery. 

At one of the old settlers' meetings I heard him relate 
the following " 'coon story," as we called it: He went 
"sparking" on a certain occasion, and remained over 
night. Upon retiring, he took off his pantaloons, as most 
people do, and laying them by the bedside, slept till morn- 
ing. On waking in the morning, he reached for his 
pantaloons, but they were gone. Where? While he lay 
there perplexed, with breakfast waiting in the same room» 
a search was instituted, and the garment found under the 
house. A sly pet 'coon had pulled the trousers through a 
small crack in the puncheon floor. He was soon dressed, 
however, and ate a hearty breakfast as if nothing unusual 
had happened. 

He was a Mason of high standing. At one time he 
served as Mayor of the city of Anderson, and at another as 
Sheriff of Madison county. A grand pioneer, with us so 
long, always on hand, he and his good wife, who loved 
Masonry as few women do — how we miss them ! We 
must not forget them. Her death occurred December 8, 
1887, and his February 11, 1893. Buried at Huntsville. 

John Tilson was also at that first meeting, rosy and 
bright, his face beaming with good nature. What a happy 
disposition he had ! He kept a store in Huntsville for 
thirty years. He came from Ohio about the year 1840, 
and died at Huntsville in 1864, little past the meridian of 
life. He and his wife are buried in Huntsville cemetery. 

Isaac Busby was another pioneer who helped to 
develop Madison county. He was a stern old man, well 
informed on all subjects, who loved his race, and, being a 
Universalist, he would have all men go to a better world. 
He died in April, 18.74, ^^^ ^^^ buried in the Busby 
cemetery. 

There was also Neal Hardy, a sturdy old pioneer. 



OLD SETTLERS MEETINGS. , I I 

deservincr notice as a good citizen, temperate, industrious 
and honest. He came to this county, with his wife, from 
Penns3lvania about the year 1833, ^^^ settled two miles 
east of Pendleton, in the locality known as the Qiiaker 
Setdement. He was not a Quaker, but his wile belonged 
to that denomination. He w^as a large, fine looking man, 
and with his own strong hands, and the assistance of his 
wife, who knew all about pioneer life, he made a farm in 
the green woods. He was an old time Whig. When the 
colored orator, Frederick Douglas, was mobbed at Pendle- 
ton in 1843, Mr. and Mrs. Hardy cared for him at their 
own house. Born in Pennsylvania in 1803, Mr. Hardy 
died November 16, 1869, and his wife died ten years later. 
Both are buried in the Friends' cemetery, near their old 
home, where so many old pioneers are sleeping. 

So man}' grand men and w'omen are recalled to mem- 
ory in this connection that I hardly know where to stop, 
but I may have more to say about some of them under 
another head. 

For several years during the " seventies," or possibly 
earlier, Hamilton and Madison counties held a joint meet- 
ing on the count}' line, just west of Perkinsville. They 
were reasonably well attended from both counties, and, so 
far as I know^, a good feeling was maintained. For some 
cause the meetings were discontinued, and for eight or ten 
j-ears none have been held. I suppose that the main cause 
of their discontinuance was the death of some of the pio- 
neers of this count}' who were foremost in promoting them. 

In this connection I can not forbear mentioning some, 
now dead but not forgotten, whom I met at these meetings. 

James Perkins, always at the front, with a never fail- 
ing fund of anecdotes, was well esteemed. He came, when 
a young lad, wdth his father, William Perkins, to Perkins- 
ville in 1825. He was well acquainted with early life in 
the county. He loved pioneer occasions, and no one could 
tell better than he the hardships and disadvantages endured 



12 OLD SETTLERS MEETINGS. 

by the lirst settlers. His long life was mainly spent at 
Perkinsville ; there he died, loved and respected, in 1884, 
at the age of sixt^^-eight years, and in the cemetery there 
he is buried. 

Thomas L. Beck with, another grand old pioneer, born 
in New York in 181 5, was alwa^^s on hand when the old 
settlers met at Perkinsville. At this place he spent the 
best days of his life. Settling there in 1836, while a young 
man, he carried on business there nearly, or quite, fifty 
years, and served as postmaster over thirty years. He 
was no speaker, but few men knew more than he of early 
life in the woods. Being well informed on all subjects, it 
is no wonder that he was held in high esteem in both Mad- 
ison and Hamilton counties. He was an old time Whig, 
and he held ihe ofBce of County Commissioner for several 
years. He was instrumental in keeping up the meetings 
at Perkinsville, and I believe none were held there after 
the death of him and of Mr. Perkins, which occurred 
about the same time. 

I must not forget Jacob Zeller. Though not so old a 
settler as some others, he came quite early to Perkinsville, 
and built there the mill, which came to be known far and 
near. In everything designed for the good of his town 
and county he was foremost. Though no public speaker, 
he always attended the old settlers' meetings, and his infiu- 
ence had much to do in encouraging them. He died 
about the year 1878, and is buried in Perkinsville ceme- 
tery. 

Among others who were always present at the old 
settlers' meetings at Perkinsville, and living in that vicin- 
ity, were Daniel Goldsburg, Alexander McClintock, Joel 
White, Joseph Downham, Solomon Neese, Dr. Garretson, 
Dr. Douglass, A. Davis, Dr. Branch, Samuel Garretson, 
J. H. Snell, Henry Anderson, W. Lee, John Wise, A. 
J. Applegate, Matt. Coy, Joel Epperly, Samuel Rich wine, 
Noah Richwine, Levi Benefield, W. H. Benefield, Marion 



OLP SETTLERS MEETINGS. 1 3 

Davis, A. T. Armstrong, Samuel Shinkle, J. W. Etzler, 
J. S. Houghman, Noah Waymire, Warren Cole, John 
Forrest, John Ashby, James McClintock, Samuel Kurtz, 
A. J. Etchison and Reuben Neese. 

One of the best of these meetings was held at Perkins- 
ville about the year 1874. J- ^- Stephenson was elected 
President and T. L. Beckwith Secretary. Among the 
speakers were W. W. Connor and H. G. Finch, of Ham- 
ilton county, and William Roach, Noah Waymire, Chas. 
Fisher, John W. Forrest and James Hollingsworth, of 
Madison county. 

A meeting held at or near Alexandria in 1873 was also 
one of the best ever held in the county. It was very well 
attended, and many good speeches about old times were 
made. I was not present, and no record of the meeting 
having been preserved, I am unable to give particulars 
of it. 

Near Frankton, also, was held a meeting of deep 
interest and fairly attended. Among the old settlers pres- 
ent I call to mind Noah Waymire, Tremulous Beeson, 
Lanta Roach, J. W. Forrest, James Hollingsworth, Wash 
King, Jonathan Davis, Francis Sigler, W. H. Qiiick, Elder 
C. Qiiick, Robert Harvey, William Suman, John Hannah, 
Jonathan Moore and Daniel King. 

Several meetings have been held in other parts of the 
county, but I have little information concerning them. I 
hope that hereafter a better record of such meetings ma\^ 
be kept for subsequent reference. Some names that should 
have appeared in the foregoing lists have, no doubt, been 
omitted, but not intentionally. 

I have often wondered why those meetings were dis- 
continued at all. They were popular. Both old and 
young delighted to attend them, and found them a "time 
for merry-making and for tears." The joy of present 
friendships was mingled with reminiscences of early hard- 
ships, of rude graves where the earliest dead lie buried, of 



H 



OLD SETTLERS MEETINGS. 



the house raising, the log rolHiig, the quihing, and of other 
scenes of long ago. 

This brings the record down to the meeting at Rud- 
dle's Grove, in the suburbs of Anderson, held August 30, 
1894. The day will be long remembered as a grand, gala 
day. 

A call had been published in all the county papers, 
signed by John Hickey, John Somerville, Meredith Stan- 
ley, James M. Thompson, Isdell Riggs, Weams Heagg, 
P'rank Watkins, Rufus Williams, Peter Rector, Wm. Cox, 
Wm. Prather, Wm. A. Mustard, W. A. Wright, EHas 
Gustin, Thos. Talmage, Daniel Goldsburg, Jos. Hancock, 
Curran Bell, John Gray, M. D. Harmon, Robert Jones, 
Patrick Kelly, John D. Mershon and William H. Prigg. 
When the day iinally com^e, it could not have been fairer, 
if it had been specially ordered for the occasion. About 
three thousand persons were present, and the Lapel band 
furnished excellent music throughout the day. Since the 
last meeting of this sort, so long a time had elapsed that 
the people were hungry for another. The old came bob- 
bing over with joy, and the young could hardly retain 
themselves. About 10 o'clock a. m. the Hon. James M. 
Farlow, of Frankton, called the meeting to order in a 
fitting and happy little speech, and introduced Mayor J. H. 
Terhune, who had been selected to preside during the da}'. 
The Mayor, whose four years' term of office was just 
expiring, was at his best, and he out did himself in an 
address of welcome, which he may well remember with 
pleasure. Everj'thing had been so well arranged that, as 
one man said, " not a cog slipped." Frank Watkins was 
chosen President of the Association, and J. L. Faulkner 
Secretary. The old veteran, James Hollingsworth, who, 
at the age of fourteen years, came here with his father in 
1820, was the first speaker. He spoke in his own peculiar 
stvle for thirt}' minutes, holding the vast crowd spell-bound 
until dmner was announced. 




'-a^^ /^<r-^/c^, oifi 



i6 OLD settlers' meetings. 

Such a dinner was never spread on this beautiful hill- 
side before. Snow white cloths lay, spread out, upon the 
green grass, loaded with eatables. Around them gathered 
old and young to feast and to make merry. In eating, in 
hand-shaking, in renewing old acquaintances and forming 
new ones, an hourpasssed, and at i o'clock p. m. the band 
called the people together by playing " Auld Lang Syne." 

The tirst speaker after dinner was Samuel Myers, so 
long with us, who spoke thirty minutes to the most atten- 
tive crowd I ever saw in a grove. He stood on crutches, 
and with faltering voice told of early events, and warned 
the young of the vices of the present day. The people 
were sad when he finished, for they knew that this was, in 
all probability, the last time they would ever hear him. 

Abisha Lewis, of Markleville, spoke about half an 
hour. With snow white hair, bending body, and cane in 
hand, he reviewed the early history of our county and its 
vast improvements, wrought on every hand. His speech 
was impressive and full of thought for young and old. 

The Hon. David S. Gooding, of Greenfield, Indiana, 
spoke an hour, to the delight of his many friends. He has 
been acquainted in Madison countv for fifl}^ years. He 
was in fine trim for the occasion, and entertained the vast 
crowd with his never-failing fund of pioneer reminiscences. 
He dwelt at length on the progress we have made since the 
earl}^ day, when, over pole bridges and through slaches, he 
rode on horseback the circuit of his appointments to hold 
the courts. Contrasting the past with the present, he 
warned the people against living too fast, and urged the 
importance of protecting our county at the polls. 

While the occasion was a happy one for the Judge, 
Charles Fisher spoke some twenty minutes, and was lis- 
tened to with groat attention. He spoke of coming to the 
county back in the twenties with his parents, and reviewed 
the past, making comparisons with it and the present. 

Hon. James Sansbury spoke thirt}' minutes, to the 



OLD settlers' meetings. I 7 

deliy,iit of all. His speech was humorous, and he made 
many happy hits. He came to Anderson in 1S50. 

Dr. Ward Cook, of Pendleton, at^er having an inter- 
esting letter read by O. H. Blackledge, spoke a few 
minutes. His voice, though feeble, was heard with delight 
and sorrow, as all knew it was in all probability his last 
appearance in public, which proved to be true, for ere a 
year closed his light went out, December 24, 1894. Oh, 
what grand words he uttered, and how we will recollect 
them in the coming 3'ears. 

Others spoke till late in the day, when the vast assem- 
bly began to depart, with a determination to meet annually 
for years to come. After the appointment of several com- 
mittees and general "hand-shaking" and "good bys," 
this, one of the best old settlers' meetings in Madison 
county, closed to meet August 29, 1895, in Ruddle's grove, 
Anderson, Ind. 

The second annual meeting of the old settlers of Mad- 
ison county was held at Ruddle's grove, August 29, 1895. 
The day being very unfavorable, there were but few pres- 
ent. In the absence of the president, Frank Watkins 
moved that James Hollingsworth act as president for the 
dav, which was carried, and J. L. Faulker secretary. 

Although there was not a large crowd, those who 
attended enjoyed the day delightfully, and it was a success 
in many respects. Those who spoke during the day were 
James Hollingsworth, Abisha Lewis, Dr. William Sewman, 
Dr. Wickersham, William Shanklin, Mrs. Dr. Hilligoss, 
Mr. Keltner and others. The Pendleton band was presen- 
ent and rendered some delightful music during the day. 
A committee of three, consisting of C. G. Mauzy, Thos. 
Harmason and Ed Roberts, was appointed to select 
officers for the year 1896. At 4 p. m. they reported for 
president, Samuel Harden ; for secretary, J. L. Faulkner ; 
for treasurer, David Conrad. At\ev hand-shaking and 
many good wishes, the}^ adjourned to meet at the same 
place the last Thursday in August, 1896, at 10 a. m. 




The cabin home of the late John Surber, of Adams Townsliip. 
Built, 1S40, and burned down, 1S7S. 



EARLY SETTLERS OF EACH TOWNSHIP. 



Following will be found the names of the first settlers of 
the fourteen townships. They are alphabetically arranged, 
that they ma}' be easily found. It is not claimed that this 
list embraces all who first settled in each township, but it 
is thought that most of them who were citizens any length 
of time have been gathered up and preserved, beginning 
with Adams and ending with Vanburen : 

ADAMS TOWNSHIP. 

Following will be found a list of those who came early 
to Adams. The list, though not complete, will embrace 
most of the families who came prior to 1840. The names 
are alphabeticall}' arranged. Some of the more prominent 
actors will be noticed under the head of "biographical 
sketches" in another part of this work. The same rule 
will apply to all the other townships in the county : 

Adams, Abram. Archer, Samuel. 

Adams, Noah. Archer, Levi. 

Armstrong-, Henry. Alford, John. 

Bridge, John. Biddle. Caleb. 

Brewer, Levi. Biddle, James. 

Bell, Thomas. Biddle, Randle. 

Birch, Hiram. Baker, John and family. 

Blake, John and family. 13rown, John. 

Blake, Abram and family. Brav, Andrew. 

Boram, Jacob and family. Basicker, Ezra. 

Boram, John. Bell, William. 

Boram, Gideon. Brown, Friend. 



20 EARLY SETTLERS OF EACH TOWNSHIP. 

Coopman, John and family. Clark, Barney and family. 
Cooper, Isaac (soldier of 1S13) Cory, Abner and family. 

Creason, Isaac and family. Capp, Michael. 

Collier, Rev. J. F. and family. Cox, William and family. 

Cromer, J. A. Chase, Henry. 

Cunnigham, Sam'l and family. Clark, Silvey. 

Crowell, Davault and family. Clark, Vene. 

Cory, Sam'l and family. Cooper, William. 

Cullipler, Isaac and family. Cunnigham, Andrew. 
Collins, Thomas and family. 

Dobson, Henry. Dailey, Cap. 

Dobson, Stephen. Dailey, Jacob H. 

Davis, John and family. Dilley, Thompson. 

Davis, Ira and family. Dilley, Rick. 

Ellison, Granville. Elsworth, David and family. 

Evans, Jacob and family. Elsworth, John and family. 
Elsworth, Andrew and family. 

Fesler, Peter and family. Fort, William. 

Fesler, Jacob and family. Franklin, Isaac. 

Fesler, David and family. Franklin, Edwin. 

Fort, Mack. Franklin, David. 

Fort, Benjamin. Fry, Joseph and family. 

Gilmore, Hugh. Gra}', Samuel. 

Gilmore, Morris. Gray, John. 

Gilmore, William. Griffith, Thomas. 
Gale, William and family. 

Hess, Michael and family. Hayes, Godfrey and family. 

Hull, Obadiah and family. Hodson, Isiah and family. 

Huston, Samuel and family. Hankins, Thomas and family 

Hawkins, David and family. Hankins, Joseph and family. 

Hoel, George W. and family. Hardman, Jacob and family. 

Hudson family. Hardman, Peter. 

Ingalls family. 

Judd,John. Jafrett family. 

Judd, Larkin. Judd, Linden. 

Judd, James. Jutld, William. 



EARLY SETTLERS OF EACH TOWNSHIP. 21 

Justice, Archibald. JucUl, David. 

Justice, Ilezekiab. Jones family. 

Justice, John J. Jones, Jonathan. 

Jackson, Samuel. Jones, Peter. 

Keller, Madison, Kesling, Robert. 

Keller, Henry. Kesling, Adam. 

Keller, John. Kesling, Samuel. 

Little, Jacoli and family. 

ISIitchell, Charles and family. ]\Iitchell, James. 

McAllister, Thos. and family. McClanahan, James. 

jNIcAUister, Garrett and famil}'. McDaniel, Levi. 

McAllister, Wm. and family. McDaniel, Jacob A. 

Murphy, Joseph. jMcCollough, George. 

Madron, Mathias. Miller, William. 

Markle, John and family. McDaniel, Bryant. 

Markle, Jacob and family. Mogal, Samuel. 

ALarkle, Adam and family. ISLalone, William. 

Nelson, John Z. Noland, James. 

Nelson, Archibald, Norman, Stephen. 
Nelson, William. 

Perdieu, Ransom. Poindexter family. 

Pool, Solomon. Pi'igg? William and family. 

Pierson, James. Prigg, Dr. E. C. 

Penn, William. Pngg. N. H. 

Probasco, John (Mex. soldier) Pendleton, John. 

Perry, Silas. Pendleton, Joseph. 

Prichard family. Padgett, John and family. 

Peden family. Powell, James. 

Peden, Joseph. Pritchaad, Samuel. 

Peden, Hiram. Poindexter, R. E. 

Pratt, Dr. Joseph. 

Riggs, John and family. Richards, Manley. 

Reger, Rev. Saul. Rittenhour, Lllis. 

Reger, L. D. Runnels, Peter. 

Reger, Manley. Riggs, Alfred. 

Reger, Anthony. Rice, David. 
Rentor, Thornton. 



22 EARLY SETTLERS OF EACH TOWNSHIP. 

Scott, Harry. Sebrell, George and family. 

Scott, Duke. Sebrell, William and family. 

Scott, Hayword. Surber, Joseph and family. 

Scott, Elsbury. Shelton, Jesse and family. 

Stanley, William. vShelton, Thomas and family. 

Sargeant, Resin. Sullivan, John and family. 

vStoughton. J. L. Sawyer family. 

Sanders, William and family. Slaughter, John and family. 

Stoler, Alichael and family. Slaughter, James. 

Seward, Samuel. vShields, James and family. 

Seward, Joseph I. Shawver, George and family. 

Seward, Francis L. Sanders, George. 

Surber, John and family. Surber, Joseph. 

Surber, Moses and family. Surber, Henrv . 
Sloan, William and family. 

Tnieblood f;imil\-. Teal, John W. 

Tucker family. Titus, Samuel and family. 

Talbott James. 

Vanwinkle, Jesse. Vanwinkle, James. 

Vanwinkle, Robert. 

Williams, Ralph, Sr. Wendell, Fred and family. 

Williams, Ralph, Jr. Wylie, Robert and family. 

Williams, Joseph. Williams, Samuel F. 

Williams, Huston. Wood, Edward. 
Williams, Zackariah. 

Among those more prominent have been Thos. Bell, 
Thomas McAllister, J. W. McAllister, Andrew Cunning- 
ham, G. W. Hoole, J. H. Daily, R. Biddle, Dr. Pratt, 
Nelson Pritchard, Ralph Williams, Isaac P'ranklin, David 
Franklin, J. F. Collier, John Boram, R. E. Poindexter, 
John Huston, William Sloan, Samuel Gray, John Justice 
and Samuel Williams. 

Among those well known in Adams and who came 
late are Abisha Lewis, S. F. Hardy, Dr. Fussell, James 
Lewis, C. G. Mauzy, Silas G. Mauzy, Frank Mauz3^, Dr. 
W. P. Harter, James Moneyhun, John Franklin, Calvin 
Franklin, Ad Forney, George Lewis, Allen Boram, John 



EARLY SETTLERS OF' EACH TOW.VSlIll'. 23 

Hayes, Dr. D. M. Rider, Dr. S. W. Edwins, Wilson Cory, 
Solon Walker and Liscum Titus. 

ANDERSON TOWNSHIP. 

Below will be found a list of the first pioneers of 
Anderson township, beginning about the year 1820. Like 
other points in the county, there will in all probability be 
left out some names who first came, but it is thought the 
list is nearly correct. The list will be found to be alpha- 
betically arranged and easy to find the names of those 
mostly deceased now f 1895). Under the head of "bio- 
graphical sketches" will some of the pioneers be noticed 
more at length ; that is, those who were more prominent 
and lived long amongst us. In many cases we will give an 
acoount of the families, what became of them, when they 
died and are buried : 

Aherton, Willis G. and family. Allen, John. 

Ally, John. " Allen, W. B. and family. 

Allen, William and family. Adams, Robert. 

Bennett, Joseph. Bucco, Isaac. 

Berry, John and family. Brown, Robert. 

Berry, Nineveh (Mex. soldier.^ Brothers, Christopher. 
Blackledge, Joel and family. Brown, Warner. 
Beard, William. Bowen, George W. 

Cray croft, Bedaker. Chapman, Nathaniel. 

Craycroft, Nathaniel. Crampton, Dr. 

Craycroft, Thomas. Clark, R. N. 

Craycroft, William. Clark, Alexander. 

Craycroft, Reuben. Clem, Ephraim. 

Curtis, William. Clem, David. 

Dewitt, John. Davis Jonathan. 

Dagitt family. Davis, Charles and family. 

Davis, Judge John. Donahue, Enoch. 
Dyson, Saint Clair. 

Elliott, Miles. Eads, Burkett and family. 

GifTord family. Galamore, John. 



24 EARLY SETTLERS OF EACH TOWNSHIP. 

Goodeykoontz family. Giinder, David. 

Hunt, Dr. John. Harpool, David. 

Hunt, Dr. William A. Harpool, Kitt. 

Hazlett, James. Harmason, John and family. 

Hall, John. Harmason, Thomas and family 

Huntington, William. Hoover, Gary T. and family. 

Harbron, family. Hophis, Isaac. 

Hollingsworth, Elias, family. Hophis, Daniel. 

Uollingsworth, James. Hophis, Alfred. 

Henderson, C. D. Hiatt, Allen. 

Hughell family. Hov^^ard, Joseph A. 

Jackson, Andrew and family. Jerry, Able. 
Jones, Dr. T. N. 

Kendell, James. Kendell, John. 

Lemon, Thomas. Lemon, Peter H. 

Loubuck family. Linsey, Nat. 

Leasure, Robert. Landis, Jacob. 

Leach, Samuel. Langley, Jonathan. 

Lloyd, Thomas. Langley, Curtis. 

Loveb.nd, L. S. Longfellow family. 

Longacre, Joseph and family. Lake, Richard. 
Longacre, Moral. 

Mennis, Jesse. Myers, William. 

Mess, John. Makepeace family. 

Mershon, W. H.and family. Merrill familv. 

Meyers, Samuel and family. Mattox, S. B. 

Mustard, William. Marks, Stephen. 

Pugh family. Pratt, Asa. 

Pittsford family. Parson, Richard, 
Price family. 

Renick, George. Ryan, D. T. and family. 

Renshaw, John. Robb, Andrew. 

Ruddle family. Ray, William and family. 

Roach, William. Read, Adam. 

Russell family. Ruddle, John B. 

Stanley, Jacob. Stinson familv. 



EARLY SETTLERS OF EACH TOWNSHIP. 25 

Stephenson family. Shannon, Joseph and family. 

Snodgrass, Joseph. Smith, Seth. 

Stanle_v, Daniel and family. Siddall family. 

Stanley, William. Sparks, William. 

Stanley, John H. Shinkle family. 

Stanley, Merideth. Salyers, John. 

Todhunter, Oren. Tetherington family. 

Todhunter, Charles. Thompson family. 

Tharp, Collins and family. Tredway, John. 

Vannort, Thomas. Vandevender family. 

Vinyard family. Vanpelt family. 

Willianl*, Robert N. Westerfield family. 

Williams, Angustus. Wright, Evans. 

Williams, Addison D. Westerfield, Dr. J. W. 

Waldron, Nollie (colored). Wyman, Dr. 

Waldron family, Woster, Robert. 

Williamson, David and family. 

Young, W^illiam and family. Young, Isaac. 

Young, Christopher. 

Zeke, J. M. 

Arnong the more prominent men, past and present, 
who have lived in and near Anderson since 1820, we 
might mention the following : John Berry, Asa Berry, 
Andrew Jackson, Dr. John W. Westfield, Evans Wright, 
William Roach, Dr. T. N. Jones, T. N. Stilwell, M. S. 
Robinson, James Sansberry, S. R. Burk, Allen Robert, N. 
Williams, John A. Howard, William Curtis, Collins Tharp, 
Elias Hollingsworth, Judge John Davis, Samuel Myers, 
William Myers, Willis G. Atherton, Dr. John Hunt, Dr. 
W. A. Hunt, Judge Mershon, David E. Croan and Col. 
William Young. 

Those who have represented us in Congress up to 1895 
are T. N. Stilwell, M. S. Robinson, William R. Myers, C^. 
T. Doxey and C. E. Henry, of Anderson. 

BOONE TOWNSHIP. 

Following will be found a partial list of those who 



26 



EARLY SETTLERS OF EACH TOWNSHIP. 



came early to Boone township, that is, previous to 1850. 
There will, no doubt, be left out some names who are 
entitled to a place here, but if any should be left out, it is 
accidental, and not done purposely. The list is alphabet- 
ically arranged and easy to find. The same rule will apply 
to all the townships in the county : 

Ball, William. Brunt, William D. 

Ball Stephen. Brunt, J. A . J. 

Brunt, Thomas, and family. Brunt, James. 

Call family. 

Castel, Peter. • 

Dovle, Adam. 



Coner, Barney. 
Clark, Thomas. 

Dickey, Samuel. 
Doyle, Dudley. 

Ellis, Bryant. 

Forrest, Rev. J. W., family. 
Freestone, Eli. 
Greenlee, William. 
Huff, John. 

Jones, L. 
Jones, Elliott. 
Rating, Ambrose. 
Kating, Joseph. 
McMahan, Morgan, family. 
Moore, John. 
Parsons, J. W. 
Petru family. 
Reeves, William, family. 
Sullivan, Thomas. 
Sullivan, Jefferson. 
Sebrell, Benjamin H. 
Sebrell, Morgan. 
Tomlinson, John. 
Thurston, I. F. 
Webster, Robert, family. 
Windsor, Jesse. 



Eaton, Peter. 

Frances, Micajah. 
Furgason, Killey. 
Greenlee, Andrew. 
Hiatt, William. 
Jones, Connor. 

Kauff'man family. 

]McMahan, Enoch. 

Perry, J. W. 

Schooley, William. 
Smith, Wright, family. 
Smith, George. 

Tagard, Andrew. 

Ward, Elijah. 



EARLY SETTLERS OF EACH TOWNSHIP. 27 

Among those who have been more or less prominent 
in Boone township are J. W. Forrest, B. H. Sebrell, E. H. 
Peters, Connor Jones, Wright Smith, George Smith, J. W. 
Parsons, J. F. Thurston, D. Spitsmesser, Jefferson Sulli- 
van, Thomas Sullivan, Micajah Frances, Dudley Doyle, 
Ambrose Kating, Andrew Kauffman, E. H. Peters and 
Cage Smith. 

DUCK-CREEK TOWNSHIP. 

Duck Creek was perhaps the last part of the great 
county of Madison to be settled. The outlook there was 
for years not very briglU on account of the heavy timber 
and water that had its way there for time immemorial ; but 
at last, perhaps about the year 1840, there was found a few 
pioneers brave enough to swim out to see if land was in 
sight, and, like the dove, returned and said there appeared 
a dry spot here and there. To-day (1895) there is a differ- 
ent outlook. The water is gone, and corn is growing in 
its place. Roads have been made, and the people here are 
now contented and happy, so close to the city of El wood, 
where there is a market for everything they can produce, a 
market right at home. It was not so forty years ago, and 
am fjlad to note the vast changes here. We owe mucii 
to the dauntless few who came liere and waded and worked 
to make Duck Creek what it is to-day, a desirable place to 
live. Below we give an alphabetical list of those who set- 
tled here previous to 1850 ; that is, all we can get. There 
will, no doubt, be left out some deserving names, which we 
very much regret, as it is difficult to obtain them all : 

Berryman, Elijah. 

Clymer family. Cochran, Henry. 

Castell, Thomas. Cochran, Thomas. 

Dougherty, Isaac. 

French, James. Frances, Micajah. 

Gray, James. 



28 EARLY SETTLERS OF EACH 

Harting family. Hollingsworth, John. 

Harmon, Thomas, family. Hedrick, William. 

Hosier, John. Handler family. 
Hosier, Malon. 

Jones, William R. 

Lucas, James A. 

Minnick, Anthony, family. McConnell, Jesse. 

Morris, Joel R. (Mex. soldier.) Mount, Thomas R. 

Newkirk, D. B. Noble, Jonathan, family. 

Owens family. 

Petru family. Parsons, James M. 

Reed family. Reter, A. C. 

Sampson, Fielding, family. Shaffer, James. 

Stanley, Asell. Stewart, Robert. 

Trambarger, Jacob. Tetrick, S. H. (Mex. soldier.) 

Trambarger, David, family. 

Wann, Isaac, family. Wa3'mire, Jacob. 

Williams, Stephen. Wardwell family. 

Waymire, David. Waymire, John S. 

FALL-CREEK TOWNSHIP. 

About the year 1820 we find the first settlement was 
made here, perhaps a year or two before any other part of 
the county. On or at the Falls the first pioneers camped 
or pitched their tents seventy years ago. A dozen or so 
families came here to tr\' their fortunes in a new countr}-. 
They came from Eastern Indiana, Ohio and Virginia, to a 
great extent poor or with little means to subsist on. They, 
however, came to stay, and soon mills, roads and houses 
w^ere built, and plenty came to them. It took an effort to 
accomplish all this. There was self-denying and plenty of 
hard work to do. A few Indians remained here at or up 
to that time, but melted away till 1834, when the last went 
to the •" setting sun." Fall Creek has kept her place in 



EARLY SETTLERS OF EACH TOWNSIIIl'. 2g 

the march of progress, and to-day (1895) she is at the 
head of the procession. Pendleton has grown to be a city 
of three thousand persons, with its factories, mills and 
other improvements, that marks our grand county to-day. 
Following is an alphabetical list of the pioneers of Fall 
Creek, or as far as we can obtain, far from being perfect 
we know, but the best is all we have to offer to those who 
came after us in the grand rush of progression. Following 
the general list a personal sketch will appear as to a few of 
those who were in the thickest of the fight : 

Anderson, Adam, family. Adamson, Thomas, family. 

Adamson, Enos, family. Allen, William, family. 

Antrim family. 

Busby, Isaac, famil3^ Bates, Hezekiah. 

Busby, William, family. Bordwell, Dr. 

Busby, Thomas, family. Bates, Daddy, family. 

Barnes, Thomas, family. Burdett family. 

Brown, William, family. Busby, John, family. 

Brown, James, family. Bell, James M., family. 
Brackenridge, Hiram, family. Brown, Martin, family. 

Boston family. Boram, George R. 

Bousman, David, family. Bailey, G. W. 
Bates, Ralph. 

Cox, Israel, family. Cattron, David, family. 

Crawford, Joseph, family. Chapman, Martin, family. 

Clark, Alexander, family. Copper, Michael. 

Cox, Moses. Crossley, Andrew. 

Cook, Dr. Ward. Chitwood, John. 

Cook, Dr. John H. Carter family. 

Cook, Lorenzo. Corey, Samuel. 

Crossley, Conrad. Carroll, A. B. 

Coonv, Archibald. Coper, Michael. 

Childers, Robert, family. CuUifer family. 

Craven, Harry, family. Corwin, Jvloses. 

Dobson, Adam, family. Dobson, Samuel. 

Dickey, Phillip. Drury, Arnold. 

Davis, Baily. Dewitt, Uriah. 



30 



EARLY SETTLERS OF EACH i 



Davis, Smith. 
Dalong, Caleb. 
Davis, Elisha. 

Eastman, Joseph, family. 
Ellis, S. S. 

Furgason, Samuel. 
Fisher, David. 
Fisher, W. H. 
Fisher, George. 

Goe, Smith. 
Goul, Henry. 
Goul, John. 
Gun, Jacob. 
Gregory family. 
Gi-ay, Benjamin. 
Gray, James. 

Hair family. 
Hardin, Phillip. 
Hardin, John. 

HoUingsworth, Elias, family. 
Hamilton, Moses W. 
Hathaway. J. P. 
Howard, Joseph. 
HoUiday, Samuel. 

Irish, James M. 
Irish, Samuel D. 
Irish, William. 
Ireland, Alexander. 
Johnson, Jeptha. 
Johnson, Lewis. 
James, Joshua. 
Joice, Arch. 
James, Joel. 
Jackson, GrifHth. 
Kountz, William. 
Killburn, Malap. 
Kinnaman, Soloman. 



Davis, George. 
Diven, George. 
Davis, Wayne. 

Eastman, Lorena. 

Fisher, John. 
Fleming, Daniel. 
Franks, H. B. 

Givens, John. 
Graham, James. 
George family. 
Goe, Hezekiah. 
Gregory, Adison. 
Gregory, B. F. 
Guy, John, family. 

Hunt, Eleasor. 
Horn, Dr. John. 
Hoover, Henry. 
Ililman, David Y. 
Hazleton, David P. 
Hardy family. 
Henry, George. 
Hazleton family. 

Ireland, John. 
Ireland, Richard. 
Ifort, William. 
I fort, Jacob. 
James, Zachariah. 
James, Jehew. 
Johnson, Col. A. 
Jackson, George. 
Jones, John, family. 
Johnson, Abel, famil}' 
Kinnaman, Conrad. 
Kinnaman, Jacob. 



EARLY SETTLERS OF EACH TOWNSHIP 



31 



Linsey, Nut. 
Lukins, Allen. 
Lukins, Benjamin. 
Lukins, William. 
Lewis, John J. 

ISIullendore, Aaron, 

Mills, William. 

Maul, P. R. 

Manafokl, James. 

Mingle family. 

McCarty famil3\ 

INIcCartney, Thomas, family 

Nelson, Arch, family. 
Neal, H., family. 
Nicholson family. 

Ogg family. 

Powell, Hartley, family. 
Pritchard family. 
Pavy, George, family. 
Pavy, Wesly, family. 

Qiiinlin famih-. 

Roach, William. 
Rulong, Alfred. 
Richard, Wiley. 
Rodgers family. 
Richmond family. 
Russell, A. E. 
Rodgers, Charles, 

Shaul, Samuel. 
Shaul, Aaron. 
Shaul, John. 
Sweet, Harry. 
Snodgrass, Benjamin. 
Snodgrass, James. 
Stout, David. 
Shaw, James. 



Lewis, Abel. 
Lewis, Simeon. 
Longnecker, James. 
Lazier, Robert. 
Lemon, Ed. 

Mitchell, Dr. T. B. 
McWiUiams, W. B. 
McAllister, John. 
Mershon, W. H. 
Masters, Stephen. 
McCarty, Patrick. 
Morgan, Uriah. 

Norris family. 
Noble, G. D. 
N eft; Jesse T. 



Prater family. 

Pendleton, Thomas M., family 
Patrick, Palmer, family. 
Parson, George. 



Rodgers, Jonathan. 
Rumler, Peter. 
Raines, Allen. 
Rodgers, Z. 
Ryan. Martin B. 
Richards, Manly. 
Roberts, Jesse W. 

Swain, J. T. 
Snodgrass, Benjamin. 
Scott, Duke. 
Scott, Elsbur}-. 
Scott, Howard. 
Shanklin, Andrew\ 
Snell, James. 
Snell, Henry. 



32 



EARLY SETTLERS OF EACH TOWNSHIP. 



Sybert, Henry. 
Sybert, William. 
Sybert, Nichols. 
Sybert, Harry. 
Sybert, Isaac. 
Simmons, Samuel. 
Simmon"?, Joshua. 

Taylor, James. 
Taylor, Andrew. 
Taylor, Jacob. 
Taylor, Samuel. 
Thomas, Ben. F. 

Ulen, Absalom, family. 

Vernon, Ed. 

Wilson, William. 
Waltz, Peter. 
Waltz, Samuel. 
Williamson, Elijah. 
Williamson, James. 
Williams, William. 
Walker, Dr. M. G. 
Walker, Theodore 
Walker, Judge John W. 
Winsell, Judge Charles. 

Zenblin, I. N. 

GREEN 



Swope family. 
Snider, Daniel. 
Snider, Thomas. 
Shuman, J. 

Silver, William, family. 
Silver, Thomas, family. 

Todd, Miles. 
Tilson, John. 
Thomas, Simon. 
Thomas, Louis. 
Teague family. 

Underwood, A. S. 

Vickery family. 

Walker, Harper. 
Wynant, James. 
Wynant, David. 

Wynant, Adam. 
Weeks family. 
Wall, Taylor W. 
Wright, Enos. 
W^right, William. 
Wright, Elias. 
Williams, Caleb. 

TOWNSHIP. 



Perhaps as early as 1821 the first settlers arrived in 
this part of the county, and settled on Fall Creek and Lick 
Creek. The people here did not have as hard times to 
open up their farms as some other parts of the county, tor 
the creeks naturally drained the land to a great extent, but 
the timber was as heavy perhaps as any place in the county, 
and this made clearinfj hard work. Green is not behind 
in furnishing grand men and women as the pioneers, and 
we gladly record their names in this volume. We will try 
arid give all the names at our command from 1821 till 1850. 



EARLY SETTLERS OF EACH TOWNSHIP, 33 

Some of the old timers will be given a sketch further on in 
this work. 

Alfont family. Alexander family. 
Anderson, John. 

Boone, Ovid. Bolinger, Anderson. 
Bolinger, Elijah, family. 

Cottrell, Abram. Corwin, Moses. 

Cottrell, Samuel. Chapman, Henry. 

Cottrell, William. Chodrick family. 

Doty family. Davis family. 

Edmondson, David. Edwards, Robert. 

Ellis, Evin. Ellis, Henry. 

Fossett family. Fossett, Robert. 

Fossett, John K. Fry, Enoch. 

Gipson, Samuel. Goul, Henry. 

George family. Goul, Christopher. 
Gordon, Elijah. 

Huston family. Holliday, Judge Samuel. 

Hiday family. House family. 
Huston, William. 

Jones, Isaac W. Jones, James. 

Jones, Wesley. Johnson, Abel. 

Kinneman, Hiram. Kinneman, Phillip. 

Kinneman, Walter. Kinneman, Richard. 

Kinneman, Zachariah. Keefer, George. 

Marsh, Samuel. McCarty family. 
Manifold family. 

Nicholson, William. Nicholson, Abram. 
Nicholson, Samuel. 

Patterson family, . Pettigrew family. 

Rick, Martin. 

Shaul, Samuel. Scott, James. 

Shaul,John. Smothers, Daniel. 

2 



34 EARLY SETTLERS OF EACH TOWNSHIP. 

Shaul, O. B. Smothers, John. 

Scott, Thomas. ShankHn, Andrew, family. 

Shaul, Josiah. Savage, Carlos. 

Scott, John. Shanklin, W. V. 

Urick family. 

Valentine family. 

Ween family. Wynn, Eli. 

Welcome, John. Williamson, William. 

Welcome, Peter. Williamson, George. 

Whitaker. Thomas. Williamson, Burrel. 

White, Wesley, family. West, Nemiah. 

Wynn, Samuel. Wilson, Nathan, and family. 

Wynn, Jonathan. 

Z\on, Benjamin F. 

JACKSON TOWNSHIP. 

Jackson, like all other places, has had its old times, 
those who came earl}^ and endured the toil and privations 
of the day. About the year 1825 the pioneers first arrived 
here, along White River, where the Indians had roamed 
and hunted years before. We will try and give the names 
of this noble band, " true and tried." They have all, like 
the Indians, gone to the happy "hunting grounds." But 
few remain to tell the old story. White, Perkins, Beck- 
with, Neese, Ashley, Dr. Douglass, Alexander McClintock, 
Joel White, Cole, Carr, Clark, Pruett, Shetterly and others 
have gone to their reward. The names of most all the 
pioneers will follow this prelude to Jackson. Few will, by 
some hook or crook, be left out, and their names will not 
appear in this honored "role," but we have done the best 
we could. Further along in this work a more entended 
notice will be given some of the more active men, under 
the head of personal sketches. That is what they are so 
much deserving of in this little volume, as Jackson has 
furnished some grand old pioneers, who are sleeping on 
the hillside of White River, near Perkinsville. 



EARLY SETTLERS OF «ACH TOWNSHIP. 



35 



Ashley family. 
Auter, Lemuel. 
Aj^gar family. 

Benetield family. 
Blair, Robert. 
Busby family. 

Cole, A. B. 
Coy family. 
Carr, Dr. 

Dyers family. 
Davis famih'. 

Epperly, Josel, and family. 

Freel, Benona. 
Foland family. 

Goldsburg family. 
Gentry family. 

Houghfam, Zachariah. 
Harless family. 
Hiday,J. h/ 

Jarrell, Joseph. 

Kinston family. 
Kemp, Henry. 
Kemp, Daniel W. 

Lee family. 

Miller family. 
AlcClintock, Alexander. 
McClintock, George. 
McClintock, James. 
Montgomery, John. 

Neese, Solomon. 
Neese, Reuben. 

Perkins, William, family. 
Perkins, James, family. 



Adair family. — 
Anshultz family. 
Auter family. 

Berryman, John. 

Beck with, T. L., family. 

Branch, Dr. C. N. 

Clark, Dr. 
Connor family. 
Clip, Jonathan. 

Danforth family. 
Davis, Marion. 

Etchison family. 

Falkner, Thomas. 



Ganetson family. 
Gill, George C. 

Houghman,' Dr. 
Hozier, Peter. 



Kurtz, Samuel. 
Kimerling, George. 
Kimerling, Lewis. 

Likins family. 

Montgomery David. 
Males, Joseph. 
McClintock, Daniel. 
McCord family. 
Miller, Joseph. 

Neese, Jacob. 
Newland, John. 

Prewitt family. 
Prather, W. B. 



36 EARLY SETTLERS OF EACH TOWNSHIP. 

Robinett family. Ryan family. 
Richwin family. 

Shetterly, Henry, family. Simmons, Allen, family. 

Shetterly, George. Shinkle, Samuel. 

Shelton, Isaac. Slusher, Jacob. 
Snell, James H. 

Williamson, Randall. Wise family. 

Wbitehead, Wm., and family. Webb, Jacob. 

Wilson, David. Webb, Tbeodore. 
White, Joel. 

Zeller, Jacob, and family. Zinn family. 

LAFAYETTE TOWNSHIP. 

Away back in the thirties the pioneers of Lafayette 
did not think they were getting in what has proven to be 
the center of the county, the heart of Indiana, and the 
middle of the gas belt; in other words, they '"builded bet- 
ter than they knew." At that time things there did not 
look so flattering, with no roads, no nothing, so to speak, 
but plenty of water, for it was running in every direction, 
but not discouraged, this band of pioneers went to work 
with sleeves rolled up, and, ax and maul resounding in the 
deep woods, they soon made a start to the grand resuhs of 
to-dav (1895.) To this noble few we owe much, and we 
can't afford to forget them now in the days of plenty that 
they inaugurated. Below And the names of most of the 
flrst settlers of Lafayette township. Under the head of 
personal sketches the reader will find a further notice of 
some of the more active men and women who first came 
here sixty years ago, most of whom are dead or moved 
aw'ay. We can't afford to tbrget them : 

Ashton, Jacob. 

Bailey, George W. Brewer, Levi (Mex. soldier.) 

Bodkin, Alexander. Brown, Lloyd. 

Bevelhimer family. Buthby, C. 

Brown, William. Bevelhimer, Charles. 



EARLV SETTLERS OF EACH TOWNSHIP. 



37 



Curtis, William. 
Croan, John, 
Clark, Thomas J. 
Clock, John. 

Elliott, Miles. 
Ends, Biirkett. 

DeHority, Caleb, family 
Davis, John H. 

Felty, Samuel. 
Free family. 

Gooding, David. 
Gooding, Lemuel. 
Gooding, Robert. 
Guvsinger, Dr. J. S. 
Gilfillen family. 
Hardcastle, William. 

Ileri, Ezra. 

Jinks, Reuben. 
Jones, Isaac. 

Keller. John. 
Kirk. William. 

Loehr family. 
Lewis. Nat., family. 

May, Samuel. 
Morris, William. 
Morell, Amos. 
Mustard family. 
Margart, John. 
Moore family. 
Matchett family. 
Mills, Henry. 

Noah, Lisander. 

Ooton, Jordan. 
Ooton, John. 

Peniston family. 



Clem family. 
Closser, James, famil3\ 
Craighead, George. 
Crisman, John. 

Eaton, Benjamin. 

Davis, Thomas B. 

Fleming, David. 

Rollings worth family. 
Hilligoss famil}-. 
Harless, David. 
Hilligoss, E. C. 
Harris, George. 
Hall, Benjamin. 

Jones, John L. 
Jenkins, L N. 

Kirk, Elsa. 

Lever, Phillip. 
Little, Jackson. 

Mead, Henrj-. 
A'lead, Stephen. 
Mead, John. 
Mustard, William. 
Mustard, George. 
Mustard, Enos. 
Michaels, John. 
Montgomery, Samuel. 

Newton, Jacob. 

Osborn, Isaac. 
Odam, David. 



38 



EARLY SETTLERS OF EACH TOWNSHIP. 



Rie, Henry. 
Ridgeway, John. 

Simmons, Allen. 
Snelson, Isaac P. 
Skinkle family. 
Sigler, Daniel. 
Smith, Alexander. 
Samuels family. 

Taylor, Matthew. 
Thompson, Rev. W. A. 
Thompson, George. 

Vanmeter, Joseph. 
Vasbinder, Phillip. 

Wilson, George. 
Wilson, Reed. 
Wier, James. 



Raines, Azalia. 
Raines, George. 

Smelsor family. 
Stanley, Thomas. 
Scott, Hamilton. 
Songer, Jasper. 
Shaw, William. 
Shaw, Jacob. 

Trotter, Wash. 
Thomas, E. D. R. 

Vanmeter, Dr. I. N. 



Wier, Jesse. 
Wilson, Thomas. 



MONROE TOWNSHIP. 

The names of the pioneers of Monroe township will 
be found below, or those who settled here prior to 1850. 
All the names will never be known, but, as far as can now 
be obtained, are. given alphabetically. Of the more prom- 
inent of the township a further account wall be given, under 
the head of personal sketches. Here, as well as other 
parts of the county, some names will no doubt be left out, 
but is not done purposely, but as many of them as we could 
obtain are given, that their names may not be lost to those 
who come after us. The hardships they endured will never 
be quite known to us. It is right that we cherish their 
names. Could some of them return to-day and witness 
the vast changes those sixty years have brought, what a 
surprise to them it would be. Alexandria, from a little 
village, has grown to a city. Railroads, manufactories 
and other advantages have in their own good time come. 
Nearly all the lirst settlers are gone. They look not out 
on those changes ; they hear not the whistle of the engine 



EARLY SETTLERS OF EACH TOWNSHIP. 39 

as it rushes past, as they sleep in their quiet homes in the 
cemeteries of the township : 

Austin, David. 

Bowers, David. Booker, Dr. 

Black, Frederick. Brunt, John. 

Bell, Thomas. Baker famil}'. 

Banks, John. Brown, Rudolph. 

Chamness, Micajah Conner family. 

Castle, Jacob. Costle, Peter. 

Castle Samuel. Carver, Barney. 

Culbertson, Elijah. Chitwood, John. 

Cree family. Cree, Robert H. 

Davis, Baxter. Draper, Joseph. 
Davis, Eli. 

Edwards, Peter, family. Ellis, Evin. 

Ellis, Wylie. Ellis, Jesse. 

Finnmore family. Fuller, Andrew. 

French family. Furgason, S. 
Fuller, Perr}-. 

Grifhn family. 

Harris, Moses. Hughes family. 

Hall, Joseph, family. Hinshaw, S. B. 

Hicks, William. Hannah, R. H. 

Jones, Joel. James, Janis. 
James, Morgan. 

Lee, Hildra. Lowrey, Nathan. 
Lee family. 

McCown, Thomas. March, George. 

Morgan, James. Moffitt family. 

Miller, Abraham. Morland, Thomas. 
Mavnard family. 

Norris, Aquilla. Norris, Stephen. 

O'Bryant, Nathan. Osborn, David. 
O'Bryant, Stephen. 



40 EARLY SETTLERS OF EACH TOWNSHIP. 

Pickard family. Panster family. 

Perry, Dr. J. W. Pickard, Thomas. 

Perry family. Price, Jacob. 

Russell family. 

Spencer, Dr. Scott, D. M. 

Scott family. Schwim, Peter. 

Schwim, Jacob, family. Smith. Warren. 
Samuels family. 

Tomlinson family. Tomlinson, Nathan E. 

Vermillion family. 

Williams, Joseph. Westerfield, Dr. Cyrus. 

Williams, Jesse. Wollen, James. 

Williamson, Elijah. Wilson family. 

PIPE-CREEK TOWNSHIP. 

The Pipe Creek settlement was known in the early 
settlement of the county, and many were not slow in wind- 
ing their way to that part of the county ; and no wonder, 
for there was much to encourage the pioneer here at an 
early day, and which proved true all along those sixty-Hve 
years, and from a handful of poor families it has grown to 
immense proportions. Elwood, a city of 8,000 souls, with 
its countless manufactories posing in every direction, 
is a contrast that makes one rejoice who loves Madison 
county. The broad fields have grown and spread out as 
far as the eye can reach, compared with the little "truck 
patch" of 1830. Frankton has not been lost in the shuffle 
by any means. On the contrarv, it has become the fifth 
place of importance in the county. Here, as elsewhere^ 
the first settlers are gone, but we will remember them in 
our further march to progression. 

Following are the names of most of those tamilies that 
came here fit'ty and sixty years ago. Glad to record this 
honored roll, and regret very much that some names will 
be lost sihgt of, but this is the best that can be done in this 




DR. JOSEPH WEEKS, Mechanicsburg, Ind. 



42 EARLY SETTLERS OF EACH TOWNSHIP. 

little effort to preserve the names of the early settlers of 
Pipe-Creek township : 

Armfield family. Adair family. 

Beeson, James. Burton, John. 

Beeson, Tremulous. Broyles family. 

Benefield family. Brown, Neely. 

Chamness, Micajah Cannaday, Caleb, and family. 

Chamness, Peter. Caloway, Dr., family. 

Chamness, Jacob. Chalfant family. 

Chamness, John. Chamness, Jobe. 

Dwigins, Elijah, and family, Douglass, Dr., family. 

Dehorty, Dr. J. M., family. Davis, B. F. 

Dwigins, Hezekiah. Deboy family. 
Denney, Benjamin. 

Etchison family. Etchison, James. 

Etchison, Walter. Ebbert, W. H. 

French family. Frazier, Jesse. 

Granger family. Gough, John. 

Howard, Samuel. Hillis family. 

Howard, John A. Hunter family. 

Hunt family. Hagerty family.; 

Jerrell, Joseph, family. Johnson, Edmond, family. 

King, Wash, family. King, William. 

King, Daniel, family. Kidwell family. 

Lane family. Little family. 

Mills, Isaac, family. Montgomery family. 

Miller, Joseph, family. McElfresh, Henry. 

Minor, Richard, family. IMoore, Isaac. 

Montgomery, Samuel. Moler, Ransom P. (Mex. sol.) 
Moore, Thomas. 

Owens family. 

Plummer, Henry, and family. Perry, Aaron. 

Roach, Lomty, and family. Rulong family. 



EARLY SETTLERS OF EACH TOWNSHIP. 43 

Reader, Jonathan, and family. Ripley, James (Mex. soldier.) 

Ring, Elijah. 

Sigler family. Shipply family. 

Sheppard, Jacob. Simmons, Mark. 

Shell, William. Snider, S. D. 

Starkey family. Savage, C. A. 

Taylor, William, family. Tharp famih-. 

W'aymire family. Waymire, Daniel. 

Wood, Alexander. Webb, Minor, family. 

Waymire, John S. Wilson, David. 

Waymire, Noah. Wells, Peter. 

Waymire, Elliott. Wright family. 

RICHLAND TOWNSHIP 

Was not slow in settling, as so many advantages were 
there held out, such as good soil, tine timber, stock water, 
and nearness to the county seat. No wonder the pioneers 
seeking homes flocked hither in an early day, and to-day 
(1895) there is no better place to live than Richland. We 
thought this before gas was given us, but now so much the 
better. The following are some of the names of the early 
pioneers, beginning about the year 1830 to 1850. They 
are given alphabeticall}^ It is not claimed we have them 
all, but it is thought most of them have been gathered up 
and preserved for those who may look over the well culti- 
vated fields and wonder who it was that cleared up the 
virgin soil. They came, did their work, and are gone, 
most of them to their reward, and many are binued in the 
various cemeteries of the county, unconcious ef the mar- 
velous improvements that have taken place during these 
fifty years. Some of the more active men of this township, 
as well as others, will be noticed more at length imder the 
head of personal sketches in this work : 
Ashcraft, Peter. 

Bowers, Joseph. Bronenburg, Jacob. 

Bennett family. Beal, Zeak. 

Brewer, Stephen. Burton family. 



44 



EARLY SETTLERS OF EACH TOWNSHIP. 



Beal family. 
Broner, Joseph. 

Carl, James. 
Croan, David S. 
Chambers family. 
Craycraft family. 
Connor, John. 

Dillon, Joseph, family. 

Eppard family. 

Falkner, Jesse. 
Falkner, Samuel. 
Falkner, James. 

Garrison, Sims, and family. 
Garner, William. 

Hiatt, Dudley. 

Holston, J. R., and fr.mily. 

Heagy, Weams, family. 

[ones, Isaac. 

Kiger family. 

Langly, Jonathan. 
Langly, Curtis. 
Lamb, Caleb. 

Moffitt family. 
Mundren family. 
Moore, Zirmi. 
Moore, John. 
ISIills, Gideon. 
Macy, William. 

Nelson, Benjamin. 
Nelson, Sol. 

Patterson, William. 
Parker, Archibald. 
Pence, Abram. 
Pence, John. 
Pence, Samuel. 



Bronenburg, Michael. 
Bodell family, 

Coburn family. 
Curtis, William. 
Chambers, Hiram. 
Coburn, John. 
Chambers, G. W. 

Dunham family. 

Eshelman family. 

Fosnot family. 
Finnemore, Matthew. 
Fuller, J. H. 

GilHllen, Thomas. 

Hancock, Joseph, family 
Holston, Joseph A. 



Lower, Christian, family. 
Lower, James. 

Maynard family. 
McNear, Andrew. 
Mathis, John. 
Maynard, Ja.nes. 
McClosky, William. 
Mabbett, Anthony. 

Nelson, John. 
Nordyke, Abram. 

Pence, Jesse. 
Patterson, George. 
Peck, Alexander. 
Pesants, Daniel. 
Pursell, J. E. 



EARLY SETTLERS OV EACH TOWNSHIP. 45 

Pence, Adam. Parker, Archibakl. 

Radclift', Jesse. Radclift', Joel. 

Sellers, Isaac, family. Stephens family. 

Shinkle family. Sutton, Henry, family. 

Smith, Charles. Stanton, Hiram, family. 

Tappen family. Thornburg, Thos., and famil}-. 

Tanner, Christopher. . 

Vermillion family. 

Walker, B. F., family. Wilson, Abram, family. 

Wilson, William, famih'. Walker, Benjamin, family. 

STONY-CREEK TOWNSHIP. 

The following is a list of the early pioneers of Stony 
Creek, or at least a part of them, who came between the 
years 1825 and 1850, as near as can be obtained. Fishers- 
burg was the only town for years. Here all the trading 
was done, and it w^as the center of all business till Lapel 
sprang up, just across the creek, now a little city within 
itself. The pioneers of this part of the county I do not 
think had as hard a time as at some other points, for the 
reason that they were better oft', not so poor, and did not 
have so many things to contend with. Plenty has always 
been with these people almost from the start, and with this 
start thev have lost nothing. I will try and give the names 
of those who came and helped make Stony Creek what it 
is to-day (1895), one of the very best in the county, and 
where, let us hope, plenty may always dwell. The reader 
will find the list alphabetically arranged and easy to find. 
In another place I will give more at length a notice of some 
of the more active in the history of Stony-Creek township: 

Anshultz, John. Aldred family. 

Anshultz, Phillip P. Apgar family. 

Andrson family. 

Busby, Thomas. Busby, Isaac. 

Busby, Samuel. Bodenhom, David, family. 



46 EARLY SETTLERS OF EACH TOWNSHIP. 

Barrett, James. 
Cecil family- 



Busby, Andrew. 
Busby, John. 

Conrad, David. 
Conrad, Mathias. 

Delawter, Jacob, family 
Delavvter, Jonathan. 
Delawter, Levi. 

Ellis family. 

Fisher, Charles. 
Fisher, Warren. 
Fisher, Samuel. 
Fisher, Benjamin. 
Fisher, John. 

Gwinn, James. 
Gwinn, Harvey. 
Gwinn, Laban. 
Gwinn, John. 

Hawkins family. 
Hanger family. 
Hunsinger, Israel. 
Hunsinger, Edwin. 
Hunsinger, William. 

Johnson, John J. 

Kynett, Dr. 

Lawson family. 
Lutz family. 

Milburn famil3^ 
Moore family. 
McDole family. 

Nicholson, Calvin. 

Passwater family, 

Reddick family. 
Rambo family. 

Sears, George W. 



Dewitt, James, 
Dewitt, Barney. 

Elston family. 

Ford, James. 
Ford, Benjamin. 
Ford, John. 
Ford, William. 
Freel, Benonia. 

Gather family. 
Gwinn, Jesse. 
Gilmore, George. 

Hunsinger, Jacob. 
Hunsinger, Daniel. 
Hufl'man family. 
Hass famil}'. 

Johnson, Benjamin F. 
Kellum family. 
Lemon, Ed. 

Milburn, Isaac. 

Martin, James, and family. 

Manis family. 



Rodgers, Z. 

Studly, Datus, family. 



EARLY SETTLERS OF EACH TOWNSHIP. 47 

Schuyler family. Shetterly family. 

Shoul, W. W. Sylvester family. 

Simpson family. Stanly, William. 

Wolf, I. G., and family. Wise family. 

Woodward family. 

UNION TOWNSHIP. 

Little Union must not be lost sight of in this work, for 
it had its first settlers as well as other parts of the county. 
Union in its history is interesting. The first people that 
lived here I do not know anything about. Their names 
are a blank, but they were here, for the}^ left their mark, 
which I hope time will never wipe out, the "mounds." 
They are silent, yet speaking. Then came the Indians, 
who hunted, fished and raised corn along White river till 
about the year 1820, when another race came. They came 
to stay, and I will give the names of the most ot those who 
first came to Union township from 1820 to 1850: 

Adams family. 

Bronenburg family. Bronenburg, John. 

Bronenburg, Fred, Sr. Bronenburg, Jacob. 

Bronenburg, Fred, Jr. Bronenburg, Carl. 

Bronenburg, Henry. Bodel family, 

Bronenburg, Michael. Burtner, Joseph. 

Cornelius family. Corsum Samuel (Indian.) 

Chambers family. Cummins, John, and family. 

Cash family. Carter, John D. 

Diltz, William, family. Diltz, John M. 

Diltz, Martin. 

Falkner family. Free, William, family. 

Fuqua family. 

Gustin, Amos, and family. Goodwin, Dr. 

Henley family. Henley, Joene. 

Henley, John. 

Ifenagle, Solomon. Isnagle, Jacob. 



48 EARLY SETTLERS OF EACH TOWNSHIP, 

Johns family. Jewell family. 

Kesling, John. 

Leathers, John, family. Landry, .Simeon. 

Langly, Curtis. 

Makepiece. Amasa. Alakepiece, Bradley. 

Makepiece, Allen. Makepiece, Ransom. 

Makepiece, Alfred. Minear, James and Amasa. 

Makepiece, George. Myers, Sol. 

Noland, Bazelton, family. Noland, William W. 

Noland, Daniel. Neely, Bassell, family. 

Noland, John. 

Richardson, John, family. Richardson, Ransom. 

Rozell, John. Richardson, A.J. 

Russell, Henry. Ratcliff, John. 

Suman family. Shaffer, David, family. 

Shiner family. Sawyer family. 

Snider, Solomon. Shaffer, Berryman, family. 

Sands family. Smith, Joseph. 

Simms, Dayid B. 

Tucker family. Tira, John. 

Tucker, G. W. Tira, Griffith. 

Tucker, Dayid. Tira, Elijah. 

Weddington, Samuel. Williams, James Aaron. 

Woods, James. Wampler family. 

VANBUREN TOWNSHIP. 

The tirst settlers of Vanburen came here about 183.6, 
down to the year 1850. The list, though not complete, is 
thought to embrace nearly all, now mosth' dead. Some 
will, no doubt, be overlooked and lost sight of in the shuf- 
fling of the cards of time. This was a dreary part of the 
coimty in 1836, and a few hard}' pioneers had much to 
contend with. Little by tittle a great change has come. 
To-day (1895) Vanburen is blossoming like a rose. Good 
roads and well cultivated fields are ever3'where to be found, 
and plenty has certainly come to the people here. To the 



EARLY SETTLERS OF EACH TOWNSHIP. 49 

old pioneers we owe much, and it is right that we should 
cherish and perpetuate their names. Monuments and slabs 
tell where man}' of them are sleeping in the various ceme- 
teries of the township. 

Below will be found an alphabetical!}' arranged list of 
those grand old men and women who first came to this 
part of our now grand county. In another part of this 
work will be found a more extended notice of some of the 
pioneers of this township, under the head of personal 
sketches : 

Allen. Reuben. Allen. Hiiam. 

Allen, Harrison. 

Blades, James. Broyles family. 

Baker, Phillip. Brown, Pryor. 

Cramer, Phillip, family. Camplin, Abijah. 

Culbertson, David. Cree, John. 

Cartwright, Thomas, family. Cox, Isaac U. 
Brouse family. 

Davis, Jacob. Dobson family. 

Finnemore family. Farmer, Uriah. 

Fear familv. Fossett family. 

Gordon, Thomas. Garrett, D. C. V. 

Heritage family. Harris family. 

Hudson family. Hughes family. 

Hundly family. 

Ingalls, Alexander, family. Ice family. 

Jones, Louis K. James, James. 

Kelsey, William. Kelsey, John. 

Moore, George. • Moors, J. S. 

iSIoore, Aquilla. McMahan familv. 

Marsh, James D. 

O'Bryant, Stephen. Oldfield, James. 

Palmer, Hiram. Plow, Henry, and family. 

Painter family. Palmer, John. 



50 EARLY SETTLERS OF EACH TOWNSHIP. 

Robinson family. Robb family, 
Ray, Charles. 

Shields, John. Smith, J. W. 

Thurston family. Thorn family. 

Webster, Robert, family. Wood family. 

Williams, Aaron, family. Webb, Jasper. 

Zedaker, J. M., family. 




DR. C. N. BRANCH, Perkixsville. Ind. 



BIOGRAPfllCflL SKETCHES. 



Following will be found some biographical sketches of 
some of the more prominent persons who have figured in 
the history of Madison county, some of whom are deceased, 
while others are living and yet acting their part of the 
" drama" of life. Whether living or dead, it is our desire 
to do them nothing but justice and deal in facts rather than 
fancies. There will be no " gushing," useless praises that 
disgusts rather than pleases those who may care to read 
them. Most of whom we write came early to the county. 
We will rather fall below than above the merit so justly 
deserved in the man}^ trying scenes they passed through. 
It would be hard, indeed, to overstate what they under- 
went. Our best efforts and time have been given to this 
part of this work, to try to find out who it was, and when 
it was, that came to our county, and to write of them in a 
deserving way, that their names and their deeds may not 
in the shuffling cards of time be lost for all time to come. 
Some of whom we write we were personally acquainted 
with. Some had passed away before we came to the 
county, but whether acquainted or not, it shall be our aim 
to write of them truthfullv as we saw them or learned of 
them, as the case may be : 

DAVID BOWERS. 

This old pioneer of Madison county was born on the 
1 2th of July, 1811, in Pike count}^ Ohio, son of Solomon 
Bowers, of Virginia. His mother's name was Deborah 
Lyton, also of Virginia. David Bowers came to Madison 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 53 

county, Ind., a poor young man, with a strong will and 
hands to make a start in the then new country. This was 
in 1834. ^^ soon found a helpmate in the person of Susan 
Edwards, daughter of Peter Edwards, who settled near 
Alexandria, Ind., in a very early day, perhaps as early as 
1828. Susan was born in Wayne county, Ind., in 1813^ 
and died December 31, 1849. ^^^^ ^^ buried at the old 
cemeter}^ south of Alexandria. Mr. and Mrs. B. were 
married in 1835. They had one son, Andrew, who was 
born on the 8th da}' of August, 1846. He married Martha 
Moore. David Bowers again married Ellen Reed in 1853. 
The tollovving are the names of the children by this mar- 
riage: Henry P., born March 13, 1855. Susan, married 
to Thomas English, resides near Summitville, Ind. James 
E., born January i , 1856, married Josephine Baker. Eliz- 
abeth, born March 15, 1858, married Joseph Beat'son, 
August 21, 1880. Mr. Beatson was born in Cincinnati, 
Ohio, June 14, 1858. David W., born in i860, married 
Nancy Brown, and resides in Delaware county, Ind. Mrs. 
Ellen Bovvers died in 1864, and is buried at the old ceme- 
tery near Alexandria. She was born in Rush county, Ind. 
Mr. Bowers was again married, September 12, 1867. to 
Mary Noble, daughter of William Noble, also a pioneer of 
Madison county. She was born in Fa3'ette county, Ind., 
June 25, 1829. Her mother's name before marriage was 
Catharine Castle. One child was born of this marriage 
(Nathan), who died at the age of five years. He is buried 
at the Odd Fellows' cemeter}', south of Alexandria. Mr. 
Bowers entered eighty acres of his land in 1834, '^^^ ^^"^^ 
added many acres since, till he has two or three fine farms. 
He has been an industrious, sober citizen, and is held in 
high esteem by his fellow-citizens who have known him so 
long. At one time he resided one mile and a half south- 
east of Alexandria, but now the town has grown almost to 
his door. The railroad from Alexandria to Muncie passes 
near his home. A strong Democrat all through life and a 



54 THE PIONEERS OF 

liberal gentleman. In 1874 ^^^ bought my first book, and 
I am indebted to him for many favors shown me from time 
to time. In person Mr. Bovvers is about five feet eight 
inches high, fair complexion, heavy set, inclined to be 
fleshy, and will weigh near two hundred pounds. 

ROBERT W. WEBSTER. 

Mr. W. was born in the State of Delaware on the 15th 
day of January, 1814. He was married to Rebecca W. 
Fisher, September 23, 1834, "^ Delaware, where she was 
born on the 24th day of October, 181 7. The family came 
to Fayette county, Ind., in 1836; remained there three 
years, when they moved to Madison county, Ind., Boone 
township, west of Summitville, where the}-^ settled, in 1839, 
in the then new county. Here in the woods the earnest 
struggle for a home began ; a hard fought battle, but vic- 
tory came, as it always does, to the courageous, faithful 
soldier. Plenty came at last to bless this interesting famil}' 
long before Mr. W. died, which event occurred January 7, 
1892, full of years and honor. Mrs. W. is yet living. She 
is the daughter of Henry Fisher. Her mother's name was 
Eliza Williamson. Mr. Fisher died in Delaware ; Mrs. 
Pusher in Madison county in 1874. The following are the 
names of Robert \V. Webster's family: Daniel W., born 
in Delaware, April 14, 1836; married Eliza J. Ball Febru- 
ary 18, 1864. She died September 4, 1875 ; is buried at 
the Deadman cemetery. Henry W., born in Fayette 
county, Ind., February 22, 1838; died in 1857, and is 
interred at Deadman cemetery. James E., born April 27, 
1839; c^i^d November 22, 1874. ^^ ^'^'^^ married to 
Frances Noble. William W., born February 2, 1841 ; 
married Samantha Inglis, daughter of Alexander Inglis, 
one of the pioneers of \^anburen township, Madison county, 
Ind. Robert B., born November 27, 1842 ; married Mar- 
tha Baker, sister of Dr. B. Baker. Celia A., born August 
10, 1846; married D. W. Beck. Eliza J., born February 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 55 

5, 1849 ■' cieceased. George W., born June 14, 1851 ; mar- 
ried Ollie Vinson. Noah, born September 7, 1855 ; died 
April 14, 1867 ; is buried at the Deadman cemetery. 
Rebecca was born April 9, 1861, and married Joshua C. 
Vinson. Mr. Webster resided several years in Boone 
township before he came to Vanburen township, in 1864. 
They first settled in Boone township in 1839. ^^^' ^- ^'^^ 
an honest man, highly respected by all who knew him, 
strong and well fitted for pioneer life. He is also buried 
at the Deadman cemetery. The family are members of 
the M. E. church. We can't afford to forget this pioneer 
family. 

JOEL COOK, M. D. 

Dr. Cook was born in Hancock county, Ind., on the 
3d day of March, 1855, son of Dr. Daniel Cook, of Fish- 
ersburg, Ind. His mother's name was Elizabeth Walker, 
daughter of Seth Walker, one of the pioneers of Hancock 
county, Ind. Dr. Coook was married to Mary A. Osborn, 
December 25, 1878. She was born in Rush county, Ind., 
February 21, 1859, daughter of Jonathan and Elizabeth 
Osborn. Names of children : Bertha, born November 
13, 1879; Wayne H., born September 18, 1881 ; Caroline 
R., born November 27, 1883; George H., born May 15, 
1886; Stanley V., born October 14, 1888; Herbert D., 
born February 11, 1891. This is an interesting family, 
and reside in Orestus, Madison county, Ind., where the 
Doctor has a good practice. He attended lectures in Louis- 
ville, Ky., in 1879, ^"^ soon located as above stated. 
Success and long life to them. 

WILLIAM E. HERRITAGE. 

Mr. Herritage is a Hoosier by birth, having been born 
in Wayne county on the 12th day of March, 1828 ; came to 
Madison county, Ind., October, 1843, and settled a short 
distance south-west of Summitville, where he now resides. 
He owns five hundred acres of choice land and a splendid 



56 THE PIONEERS OF 

house, and enjo3's the confidence and esteem of those who 
have known him so long and well. He was married to 
Ehza A. Vinson on the 4th day of March, 1852. The 
following are the names of his children: George W., 
Mary E., Albert L., Oliver M., and Willie L., who died, 
aged twenty-six years, and is buried at the Vinson ceme- 
tery. Mrs. Herritage was born in 1829, died March 28, 
18S5, ^^^ is buried at the Vinson cemetery. Mr. H. was 
again married to Mrs. Hannah A. Weaver, daughter of 
Micajah Chamness, one of the pioneers of Madison county, 
Ind. She was born May 27, 1842. Mr. and Mrs. Herri- 
tage are members of the Christian Church. Mr. H. has 
been a hard worker all his life, and will no doubt die wdth 
the harness on, if I am allow'ed the expression. He is a 
live Republican. I wish this couple long years to come. 

JESSE VERMILLION, SR., 

One of the grand old pioneers of Madison county, Ind., 
was born in Virginia, June 5, 1804, and came to Lawa-ence 
county, Ohio, when a young man. He was married to 
Catharine Justice when about tw^enty-live years of age. 
Came to Madison county in 1836, when the county was 
very new and but little developed. He, with strong hands, 
went to work in the green woods and distant neighbors 
Avith a determination to make a farm. He succeeded, and 
at his death, February 8, 1892, w^as in possession of eight 
hundred acres of land, and w^as among the wealthy men 
of Monroe township. About the time he began to live in 
his new home his wife died, and is buried at the Holston 
cemeter}'. The names of the children by this marriage 
are Chauncey, Samuel, Uriah C, Elizabeth and Cynthia, 
the last two deceased. Mr. V. w^as the second time mar- 
ried to Mary Morrow. One child was born to them, Sarah 
C, married to Daniel Tinker, and resides in Lapel, Ind. 
Elizabeth was married to Thomas Meredith, both deceased. 
On the 7th day of April, 1856, he was again married to 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 57 

Mrs. Rhoda Rutherford, who died September, 1894. She 
was born May 10, 1824, in the State of Indiana. Chauncey 
was born in Ohio, May 12, 1834; niarried first to Miss 
Pence and the second time to Nancy Maynard. U. C. 
married Marry Morrow. Jesse VermilHon, Sr., was made a 
Mason many years ago at Chesterfield. Ind., and practiced 
its man\^ noble teachings. In person Mr. V. was full six 
feet high, strong and well made, well fitted for a pioneer 
life, which he filled long and well. He settled five miles 
south-east of Alexandria and ten miles north-east of Ander- 
son, just in the south edge of Monroe township. He was 
a Democrat of the Jeft'ersonian school. He will long be 
remembered as one of the best men who had the hardihood 
to enter the wild woods of Indiana. He was a Baptist 
many years. He was respected in life and lamented in 
death. 

Mr. Tinker died since the above was written. 

BARNABAS MAYNARD, SR. 

Mr. Maynard, son of Moses Ma3'nard and Sarah 
Greenstreke, was born in Kentucky on the 7th day of April,. 
1813. He was married to Lucinda Fuller in 1833, who 
was born in Kentacky in 1814. Came to Madison county, 
Ind., in 1834, '^^^ began life in the woods under many 
disadvantages, being poor, but with a strong will to make 
a start in life. Mr. Maynard died in September, 1889, and 
buried at the Holston cemetery, near the old home. Moses 
Maynard, father of Barnabas, also came early to Madison 
county with his famil}^ He died June 18, 1874. ^^^ wife, 
Sarah Greenstreke, died in 1846. Both are buried at the 
old cemetery known as Holston. The following are the 
names of Barnabas Maynard's children : Jacob, born in 
Kentucky, May, 1834; Chrtstopher, born in Indiana, Jan- 
uary 26, 1836; Siannia, born November 20, 1838 ; Martha, 
born February 16, 1840 ; Rebecca, born May 19, 1842; 
Johnson II., born February 4, 1844 ; James, born October 



58 THE PIONEERS OF 

29, 1845 ; Nanc3% born January 12, 1847 ; Lewis C, born 
November 15, 1849; John A., born December i, 1850 ; 
Lucinda and Barnabas (twinsj, born Januar}^ 19, 1855 ; 
William Anderson Buchanan, born March 11, 1857 ; Lucas 
Darling, born July 7, 2860. Nancy was married to Sam- 
uel Vermillion ; Lucinda to Ed Loumas ; John A. to Rosa 
Nelis, and resides in Anderson ; Barnabas to Isabelle 
Etchison ; Siannia to Joseph Elswarth ; he died April 20, 
1890, is buried at Mt. Pisgah cemetery ; Rebecca married 
first to James Woods and then to Rev. Benjamin M. Zion, 
and resides in Anderson, Ind. ; Martha was married to 
John Swindell and James to Julia Smith. Jacob died July 
4, 1858; Christopher died October 1845 ; Johnson H. died 
September 23, 1845 ; Lucas Darling died September, 1878 ; 
William A. died January 4, 1858. All the deceased are 
buried at the Holston cemetery, near the old home. This 
is one of the largest and most interesting families of the 
county. About one-half are dead. 

Mr. B. was a Mason of long standing, but not a mem- 
ber of any church. He was always temperate and honest 
in his long life, a Democrat of the Jackson school, and a 
hard worker all his life. 

Mrs. Maynard is yet living. She was born April 14, 
18 14, is a Baptist, and a member of the church near her 
house. She is much devoted to her famil}^ and friends, and 
has a good word for all. They reside about eight miles 
north-east of Anderson, Ind., and four miles south-east of 
Alexandria, in Monroe township. 

Moses Maynard was born in North Carolina in 1767, 
and came to Kentucky soon after marriage, in 1788. Mrs. 
Lucinda Maynard's father's name was John Fuller. Her 
mother's name was Mary Frell. 

Moses Maynard lived to 107 years of age ; is buried at 
the Holston cemetery. 

CHARLES FREDERICK HENN. 

Mr. H. was born in Baden, German}-, on the 26th day 




WILLIAM SLOAN, SR., Adams Township (Dec'd.) 



6o THE PIONEERS OF 

of November, 1824, and received a collegiate education 
there before he came to America, in 185 1. He first came 
to Dayton, Ohio, and then to Indianapolis, where he 
stopped onl}' a short time, when he came to Perkinsville, 
Ind., where he worked at his trade, tailoring, for near 
twenty years. The last ten years he has been living on 
his fine farm, three miles south of Frankton, where he 
divides his time farming and tailoring. He is a fine gard- 
ner and fruit grower, and has as fine an orchard as you 
will find in the county. On the i8th day of May, 1853, he 
was married to Mary L. Gardner. She was also born in 
Germany, December 13, 1835. She came to America in 
1839, ^^^^ to Bufialo and then to Dayton, Ohio. Mr. H. 
is an accomplished scholar, and was for several years 
book-keeper in his native land. He speaks Germann and 
French ftuentl}', and is well informed on the history of his 
native land. He is a dear lover of liberty, and no wonder 
he longed to come to America, the home of the free and 
brave. 

The following are the names of the children of Mr. 
and Mrs. Henn : Ernestine, born March 27, 1861 ; was 
married to Wesley Wise, August 28, 1879. Albert, born 
April 9, 1867 ; was married to Sidna Balser. She was 
born in Tipton county, Ind., February 13, 1871. Both 
children were born in Perkinsville, where the family resided 
from 1853 to 1882, when they moved to the farm. Mr. H. 
is a Republican, but neither he nor his wife belong to 
church. His father's name was Jacob Henn. 

Mr. Charles F. Henn graduated honorably in 1842. 
He was an industrious scholar, and stood at the head of 
his class. In the old country, when a young man, he loved 
liberty so well and had such a hatred for tyranny and 
oppression that he joined a party of soldiers, who could not 
stand oppression, and arrayed themselves on the side of 
liberty. They, however, were overpowered and disbanded, 
and he soon sought America. 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 6 1 

CHAUNCEY VERMILLION, 

Wlio resides four miles north-west of the city of Ander- 
son, was born in Lawrence county, Ohio, May 12, 1834. 
He is the eldest son of the late Jesse Vermillion, of Monroe 
township, Madison county, Ind., who came to the county in 
1834, when Chauncey was less than a year old. Chauncey 
has been a citizen of the county since that time, and is 
well known as an upright man. He was first married to 
Amanda Pence, on March lo, 1856. She died April 30, 
1861, just a few davs after the late war begun. She is 
buried at the Hagey cemetery. Two children were born 
of this marriage, Mary and Amanda. Amanda is married 
to Mr. Al Curtis, Trustee of Richland township. Mr. V. 
was the second time married to Esther Kiger, November 
10, 1864. The following are names of the children : Allie, 
Willis W., married Miss Broadbent, John, Elmer and Cora, 
single, at home. 

Chauncey Vermillion is a brother of U. C. Vermillion, 
Samuel Vermillion, Elizabeth and Cynthia and half brother 
of Mrs. Sarah C. Tinker, of Lapel, Ind. His mother's 
name before marriage was Cynthia Justice, who died about 
the year 1850. 

Mr. Chaunce}' Vermillion is one of the substantial men 
of Madison county, and a free thinker and voter. He has 
a fine farm tour miles north-west of the city of Anderson, 
where, let us hope, he may live long and prosper. In 
1874, when I published the first history of Madison county, 
he bought one of my books, and I have known him quite 
well since. He is an every-day man, honest and reliable, 
and you always know' where to find him. At this writing 
(1895) he is just in the prime of life, when the follies of 
3'outh are past and the thoughtful hours are at hand. Man}' 
years ago he joined the Masonic order. Though not an 
active member, he practices its noble teachings with his 
tellow-man. His father, Jesse Vermillion, was born in 



62 THE PIONEERS OF 

Virginia, June 5, 1804, and died February 8, 1892. Mr. 
and Mrs. Jesse Vermillion are buried at the Holston ceme- 
tery in Richland township. 

ISAAC P. OSBORN. 

'Squire Osborn was born in Wa^-ne county, Ind., June 
21, 1824, son of William Osborn. His mother's name 
before marriage was Naomi Edwards. Mr. Osborn was 
first married to Sarah L. Neese, daughter of Jacob Neese, 
an early settler of Madison county, Ind. This event occur- 
red December 22, 1850. She died November 5, 1855. 
Their children's names are Andrew J., born October 26, 
1851, married to Mary A. Kirkham, and resides in Logans- 
port, Ind.; Sarah A., born November 16, 1854. ^^^"' 
Osborn was again married to Sarah A. Carter in Delaware 
county, Ind., October 16, 1861. She was born in Athens 
count}', Ohio, October 8, 1832. She was first married to 
Joseph Ginn on the 7th day of March, 1850. He died in 
April of the same year. Mrs. Osborr's father's name was 
George Carter, and her mother's name Mary Wilkins. 

Mr. and Mrs. Osborn came to their home in Madison 
county, Lafayette township, in 1861 , where they now reside, 
seven miles north-west of Anderson, Ind., and two miles 
north-west of Florida, which is their post-office. Mr. O. 
served the citizens of his township four years as Justice of 
the Peace to the general satisfaction of the people there. 
He is a well informed gentleman and well posted on the 
history of the county. For the past ten years he has been 
greatly afflicted with rheumatism, so much so as to require 
a cane to walk wdth. He has a fine farm on the railroad 
leading from Cincinnati to Chicago. 

Mr. and Mrs. Osborn belong to the Christian Church, 
and are held in high estem by all their friends. Mr. O. 
has traveled extensively, and is a fine conversationalist, as 
well as Mrs. Osborn. Call and see them at their home in 
Lafayette township. 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 6^ 

CHARLES A. McCLEAD. 

I do not wish to forget the one whose name heads this 
sketch, one of the prominent men of Madison county. He 
was born in Washington county, Pa., on the 19th da}- of 
February, 1820, son of Lewis P. McClead, of New Jerse}-. 
His mother's name was Mary Brown, also of New Jersey. 

Mr. Charles A. McClead was married to Phebe Car- 
ver, December 18, 1843. Came to Madison count}^, Ind., 
in 1848 : resided in Ohio several years ; then in Pennsylva- 
nia several 3'ears ; then at New Orleans. He came to 
Madison county when it was comparatively new. He has 
developed a fine farm out of the green woods and erected 
good buildings, and has on his farm all the improved 
implements to operate it with. He is also engaged in stock 
raising ; in fact he is at the head of improvements of all 
kinds. He owns near three hundred acres of land in 
Monroe township, where he now resides. Mr. McC. is 
well known throughout the county, and could have any 
office he desired, but has always declined to accept, prefer- 
ring to live a private life and attend to his farming interests. 
He is a Democrat of the Jacksonian school, well informed 
■on all subjects, a constant reader, does his own reading 
and thinking, and you always tind him firm in his convic- 
tions of right. He is in person rather square built, of 
llorid complexion, about five feet ten inches high, and will 
weigh two hundred pounds. 

The following are the names of his children : Emil}', 
married to Bazel Thomas ; Amanda, single, at home ; 
Francis M., married to Delila Brown ; Mar3% married to 
W. H. Russell (deceased), second time to Ed Johnson ; 
Ellen, married to Nathan McMahan ; Newton (deceased), 
buried at the Carver cemetery ; Olvie, Miner, Martin L. 
and Lucy. 

Mr. McClead lives five miles north-west of Alexandria 
and three miles north of Orestus. 



64 THE PIONEERS OF 

NOAH RICHWINE. 

Mr. R. is one of the progressive farmers of Jackson 
township, Madison county, Ind., son of Gideon Rich wine, 
one of the pioneers of that localit}'. His mother's name 
before marriage was Elizabeth Rader, both living (1893) 
in Frankton, ind. Noah was born in Wayne count}-, Ind., 
January 14, 184 1 ; came with his parents to Madison county 
in 1848. Mr. R. owns 240 acres of choice land in Jackson 
township, where he has lived since he was seven years of 
age. He was first married to Elizabeth Shell, daughter of 
Isaac Shell, who was also an early settler of the same 
township. This event occurred in 1861. She died April 
27, 1870, and is buried at the Shell cemetery, aged twenty- 
two years and five months. Children born of this marriage : 
Marcellus U., born October 2, 1862, married to Martha 
McCord ; Maranus E., born February 11, 1865, married to 
Maggie Lykins. Mr. R. was again married to Sarah 
Etchison, daughter of Douglass E. Etchison. Her moth- 
er's name was Mary A. Foland. The event ol his second 
marriage was on November 20, 1870. She was born 
October 23, 1848. Children's names by second marriage: 
Luella F., born November 10, 1871, married to William 
W. McCord ; Charles N., born October 22, 1873, died 
September, 1874, buried at Shell cemetery ; Cora M., born 
Februar}' 15, 1875, ^^ home; Herman D., born April 26, 
1886, at home. 

Mr. and Mrs. Richwine belong to the M. P. Metho- 
dist Church, and are among the best citizens of the county. 
He is a Democrat, and served as Trustee of Jackson town- 
ship from 1884 to 1886. He is fond of hunting, and is a 
capital shot, and has some trophies of the field in his home. 
One, a fine deer's head, mounted in good style, adorns one 
of his rooms. 

This family, though industrious, finds time to read and 
reflect. The table is covered with choice books and papers. 
To siiow their taste in this line, thev have bought three 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 65 

of my books, for which they have my thanks. They resid 
ten miles north-west of the cit}' of Anderson and four miles 
south-west of Frankton, their post-office. 

LEWIS S. SUMMERS. 

Mr. S. was born in Henr}- county, Ind., April lo, 
1846: is a son of Samuel and Susan Summers. Her name 
before marriage was Wright. Lewis was married to Mary 
L. Austin, in Bellville, 111., January 4, 1866. She w^as 
born November 16, 1849, daughter of Geo. Austin. When 
a lad of eight or ten \-ears, Lewis, with his parents, moved 
to Madison county, Ind., where his parents died, highly 
respected. 

The following are the names of the children of Mr. 
and Mrs. Lewis Summers: Samuel E., born August 14, 
1870 ; died August 3, 1889; buried at Alexandria, Ind. 
Bertha E., born July 20, 1873 ; died November 2, 1889. 
Olevia G., born October 23, 1875 ; died October 14, 1891 ; 
buried at Marissa, 111. Daisy E., born Februar}- 28, 1879. 
Roscoe I., born April i, 1881. 

Mr. Summers entered the Thirty-fourth Indiana Regi- 
ment, Compan}" E, Capt. Jones, at Anderson, Ind., 1863, 
and was discharged at Indianapolis in 1865. Mr. S. is a 
staunch Republican. He and his wife are Methodists. 
Resides eight miles north-east of Anderson, in Richland 
township. 

ALEXANDER S. W^OOD. 

Mr. Wood was born in Scotland on March 2, 183 1, 
son of John Wood. He came to America in 1849, first 
arriving at Philadelphia. From there he went to New 
Jersey in 1852. In 1859 ^^ came to Madison county, Ind., 
where he lived up to his death, December 27, 1892. He is 
buried at Eldwood, Ind. He was married to Elizabeth 
Sterzendach, October 6, 1859. She was born in Buder 
county, Ohio, February 14, 1840. Her mother's name 
was Eliza Heller. 

3 



66 



THE PIONREES OF 



The following are the names of Mr. and Mrs. Wood's 
fi^mily : George A., married Minnie Ball; Elizabeth I., 
married Elias Todd ; John A., resides in Alexandria ; Wil- 
liam P., resides in Ehvood ; Caroline E., single ; Ellen J., 
married to William Waymire ; Earl E., at home. 

Mr. Wood served twelve years as Justice of the Peace, 
was a devoted Mason, and a Democrat. The famil}^ live 
midway between Alexandria and Elwood. He was the 
first merchant in Dimde, and highly respected in life and 
lamented in death. 

. BENJAMIN COPPER. 

Mr. Copper was born in Lawrence county, Pa., on the 
15th day of November, 1842, son of Alexander and Eliza- 
beth Copper. Benjamin Copper was married to Nancy J. 
Austerlitz, August, 1868. She was born in Switzerland 
county, Ind., in 1853, died August 23, 1873, and is buried 
at the Perkinsville cemetery. 

Mr. Copper learned the shoemaker's trade at Alfont, 
Tnd., and has for many years been working at his trade at 
Perkinsville, Ind. August i, 1862, he enlisted in Company' 
G, Twelt'th Indiana volunteers. Col. Link, under Capt. 
James Huston. He served three years faithfully, and was 
in several hard fought battles, such as Richmond, Ky,, 
Vicksburg, Mission Ridge and Atlanta, in all twenty-two. 
He was discharged at Washington, D. C, June, 1865, at 
the close of the war. Mr. C. is proud of his war record, 
and it is certainl}^ a credit to one who was so long and 
faithful in his country's cause. He is a Republican, and a 
member of the G. A. R. at Lapel, Ind. 

JAMES W. JARRETT. 

Mr. Jarrett, son of William Jarrett and Barbara Smith, 
was born on Lick Creek, Madison county, Ind., March 15, 
1833. He w^as raised on a farm there, and this has been 
his chief occupation through life. He was married to 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 67 

Uica A. Nibarger, daughter of Jacob S. Nibarger and 
Lucinda Harris. Mrs. Jarrett was born May 2, 1850, and 
married on the 20th day of December, 1876. Soon after 
marriage they moved to Monroe township, Madison count}', 
six miles north-west of Alexandria, Ind., where they now 
{1893) reside. 

Mr. Jarrett entered the army August 14, 1862, Com- 
pany B, Eighty-ninth Indiana volunteers, at Pendleton, 
Ind., Capt. Sam Ilenr}-, Col. Hervey Craven. Served 
three years, and was discharged at Mobile, Ala., Juh' 19, 
1S65. He was in the following battles: Munfordsville, 
Nashville, Pleasant Hill and Yellow Beona. 

The following are the names of the children : Eva- 
line, married to Sherman Myers, resides in Yorktown, 
Ind: Ora M., married to A. Hudson; Clara, Louis V., 
Elener, Henry R. and Vessie R. The family belongs to 
the U. B. Church. Mr. J. is a Republican. One child 
died in infancy, and is buried at the Moss cemetery, six 
miles west of Anderson. 

LENNOX GOODING. 

x\mong the good men of Lafa^-ette township, Madison 
•county, Ind., I do not wish to forget Mr. Gooding, for in 
1874, when I first met him at his pleasant home, eight 
miles north-west of Anderson and three miles south-east 
of Frankton, he bought one of my first books, and I have 
been acquainted with him ever since. He was born in that 
grand old State, Kentucky, March 9, 1829, son of Samuel 
Gooding. His mother's name was Martha Hinton, who 
was also born in Kentucky. He was married to Martha 
Calahan, September 11, 185 1. She was born in Fleming 
county, Ky., April 2, 1827. They came to Madison county 
in 1853, where they have since resided, and where they 
own a fine farm, imder a good state of cultivation. 

The following are the names of the children : John 
D., born August 16, 1852, married to Emma Tyner, and 




HON. JOHN H. TERHUNE, 
Ex-AIayor Anderson, Ind. 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 69 

resides in Anderson. He is deputy SheritV under W. W. 
\'andyke. Margaret, born January 8, 1857, married to 
Isaac Bronenburg. James R., born November 2, 1859, 
married to Sarab Rile, daugbter ot" Daniel Rife, of tbe 
same townsbip. Mr. and Mrs. Gooding are members of 
the Metliodist Cburcb. He is a Democrat. 

LEVI DELOUGHTER 

Is a son of Jonathan Deloughter, who came to Madi- 
son count}' in a very early day. Levi's mother's name 
before marriage was Elizabeth Whitmore. Levi was born 
April 21, 1843, and was married to Pbebe J. Anderson, 
May 23, 1870. She was born July 23, 1847, daughter of 
William Anderson, who died Jnl}- 3, 1864. Her mother's 
name was Sarah Kassalt, who died April 13, 1891. Both 
are buried at tbe Woodward cemetery. 

The following are the names of the children of Levi 
and Phebe J. Deloughter: Charles O., born Januar}- 16, 
1872. Laura A., born May 23, 1873. She was married to 
John Badgly, September 8, 1891. William E., born March 
13, 1874; ^'^^^ J^ly ^^^^ 1874. Jolin P., born October 8, 
1878. Harr}', born July 19, 1885. Elmer W., born Sep- 
tember 15, 1887. 

Mr. D. owns a large tract of land in Stony-Creek 
township, where he has a fine farm and splendid buildings 
on it. He has been actively engaged in farming and mill- 
ing for many years, and is among the active men of the 
county. He resides six miles west of the city of Anderson, 
on the Midland railroad. 

JOHN D. MARKLE. 

When I went to Markleville in 1859 ^ ^^"^^ "^^^ ^^*'- 
Markle, who was then young and active, and one of the 
strongest men of my acquaintance. Soon after he moved 
to Monroe township, three miles east of Alexandria, where 
he made a fine farm out of the green woods, and where he 



yo THE PIONEERS OF 

died May 6, 1892. He was married to Sarah J. Adams 
January, 1853. She was born, as well as John D., in 
Madison county. She was born January 13, 1835, '^^^ 
died June 21, 1888. Both are buried at the Walker ceme- 
tery, in Monroe township. Mr. Markle was born near 
Huntsville, Ind., December, 1829, son of the late John 
Markle, who was among the lirst men to come to Madison 
county. He died December 19, 1865. He and his wife 
are buried at the Walker cemetery', in Adams township. 
Mr. John Markle's wife's name was Sallie Allen, who died 
in i86r. 

The following are the names of Mr. John D. Markle's 
children: John W., married to Retta Biddle, June 28, 
1891. He w^as born October 3, 1854, and died, 1894. 
Robert I., born January 3, 1855 ; died April 21, 1882, and 
is buried at the Walker cemetery. Henry H., born March 
4, 1857 ; married to Nora Perry, and resides in Frankton, 
Ind. David J., born November 8, 1858 ; married to Miss 
Barrett. Samuel E., born August 20, i860; married to 
Emma J. Painter; resides in Alexandria, Ind. Charles 
C, born December 4, 1861 ; single. Thomas B., born 
January 12, 1864; married to Mellissa Broyles. Daniel 
C, born May 14, 1865 ; single. Cor3^ell, born December 
17, 1872; died October 13, 1874; buried at Walker ceme- 
tery. Frances A., born September 27, 1868, and died 
November 17, 1881. Noah M., born May 10, 1870 ; single. 
Lucy B., born May 14, 1874 5 single. Jennette, born May 
14, 1875 ; single. One died in infancy. All of this large 
family were born in Madison county. This is one ot the 
best families I ever was acqainted with, who loved and 
respected their parents, and helped make the farm. The 
family are Democrats throughout. 

WYLIE ELLIS. 

Mr. Ellis was born in North Carolina on July 12, 182 1, 
son of James Ellis. His mother's name before marriage 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 7 1 

was Margaret Phillips. He was married to Sarah J. Old- 
tield in Madison county, Ind., November 9, 185 1. She 
was born June i, 183 1 , daughter of William Oldtield. Her 
mother's name before marriage was Celia Williams. Mr. 
Ellis came to Madison county in 1848, settling in Monroe 
township, four miles north-w^est of Alexandria, where he 
now resides^and has a pleasant home. The following are 
the names of the fami'y : William Thomas, born Septem- 
ber I, 1852 ; died August 22, 1892 ; buried at Alexandria, 
Ind. Oliver, F., born August 29, 1854. Ira, born May 
27, 1856. Albert, born June 24, 1858 ; died July 27, 1862 ; 
is buried at Lilly Creek cemetery. Willis S., born August 

17, 1861 ; married to Gertrude Hinshaw^ in 1889, daughter 
of Seth Hinshaw\ of Alexandria, Ind. He served six 
years as County Superintendent of schools of Madison 
count}', Ind., from 1887 to 1893, when he w^as appointed 
deputy Secretary of State by W. R. Myers, and moved to 
Indianapolis in January, 1893. James C, born October 

18, 1864; died April 15, .1890; buried at Alexandria, Ind. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ellis are members of the Christian 
Church, and very highly respected in Madison county, 
where they are well known. Mr. E. is a Democrat. I am 
glad of the acquaintance of this enterprising family. 
THOMAS P. BALLARD. 

Comrade Ballard resides seven miles north of the city 
of Anderson and three miles south of Alexandria, near the 
railroad. He is a son of Aaron Ballard. His mother's 
name before marriage was Nancy Pierson. Thomas P. 
was born December 7, 1836, just in time to make a capital 
soldier of 1861-5, wdiich he did, joining Company D, 
Thirty-fourth Indiana volunteers, Capt. Joshua Fussell, 
Col. Jones. He was in several batdes, among which was 
Palmetto Ranch. He was discharged at Brownsville, 
Texas, in 1865, after serving his time out. 

The following are the names of his children : Viola 
S., married to Peter McGill : Aaron, dead, and buried at 



72 THE PIONEERS OF 

Alexandria ; was married to Mary V. Wilson ; John R. , mar- 
ried to Allie Cooper ; Matlie A. married to J. M. Thomas ; 
Nancy A., married to John H. Peck ; Robert H., at home ; 
Margaret E., at home ; Odella, at home ; Mary I., Thomas 
P. (deceased), and Raymond B. Mr. and Mrs. B. belong 
to the N.ewlight Church. He is a member of the G. A. R. 
at Alexandria, Ind. 

GEORGE ROBINETT. 

George lives in Jackson township, Madison count}', 
Ind., eight miles west of the city of Anderson, on the 
north bank of White river, overlooking the beautiful valley 
between him and Hamilton, on the opposite side of the 
river. Mr. Robinett was born February 14, 1839, ^^^^ ^^ 
Lemuel Robinett. He was married to Cynthia Miller, 
daughter of Joseph Miller, in 1866. She was born Janu- 
ary I, 1849. Her mother's name was Almira Morris 
before marriage with Mr. Miller. The following are the 
names of Mr. and Mrs. Robinett's children: John W., 
born November 16, 1867; died Ma}^ 25, 1888; Lillie B., 
born October 6, 1869; George O., born September 18, 
1874; died in infancy; Lydia D., born October 19, 1882; 
Georgie, born October 13, 1886. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robinett belong to the M. E. Church, 
and are highly respected wherever known. Mr. R. is a 
good farmer, having lived on a farm all his life. He is a 
Democrat, and has been all his life, and has no reason to 
regret it. I have known him since 1874. He bought one 
of my first books in that year. 

ABSALOM P. CROSS. 

Mr. Cross was born in Rush county, Ind., December 
4, 1834, ^^'^ ^^ Pleasant Cross and Rebecca Jeffries. A. 
P. was married to Ann Thomas, daughter of Philander 
Thomas, July 29, i860, in Rome, 111. The following are 
their children's names : El well L., born October 25, 1862 ; 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 73 

Louis E., born March 2, 1870 ; Worth L., born October 
22, 1882. 

Mr. Cross is a staunch Democrat and a tip top man ; 
has a tine farm three miles south of Alexandria, in Monroe 
township. He belongs to the order of Red Men, Shingle 
Maly tribe, No. no, at Alexandria. He was drafted to go 
to the late war of 186 1-5, but was not able for duty, and 
returned home to the peaceful pursuits of life, which is 
more congenial to his notion of things. He is well informed 
on subjects and a hne talker. His wife is a lad}' of fine 
qualities, and has a host of friends. 

WILLIAM PRATHER. 

Among the prosperous farmers of Stony-Creek town- 
ship, Madison county, Ind., I do not wish to forget Mr. 
Prather and famil}^, w'here I have often been hospitably 
entertained. In 1874 ^^^'- ^- bought one of my first works, 
and I have known him quite well since. He was born in 
Wayne county, Ind., January 12, 1832, son of Nathan 
Prather, who came to Madison county in 1834, '^"*^ ^'^'^^^ 
was born in Virginia. His mother's name was Jane Low. 
She was born in North Carolina, but was married to Mr. 
P. in Wayne county, Ind. William Prather's wife's name 
^vas Sarah Gwinn, daughter of James Gwinn, who came to 
the county in an early day. She was born September 23, 
1839. ^^^' mother's name was Mary Huntsinger, who 
died May 12, i860, and is buried at the Woodward ceme- 
tery, in Madison count}-. Mr. Gwinn was born in West 
Virginia, February 11, 1811. Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Prather 
were married in Madison county, Ind., October 23, 1864. 
The following are the names of their children : Madison, 
born May 7, 1867 ; married to Cory Alexander. Sylvester 
G., born March 20, 1869; at home. 

JESSE PECK. 

This grand old pioneer of Hamilton county, Ind., was 
born in Ross county, Ohio, September 22, 1822, son of 



74 THE PIONEERS OF 

William Peck. Jesse Peck came to Hamilton county^ 
and settlied near Strawtown, on White river. On the 
nth day of September, 1845, he was married to Jane Gil- 
lillen. She was born in Ross count}', O., August 9, 1S26 ; 
came to Madison county in 1855, and settled in Richland 
township, eight miles north-east of Anderson. Mr. and 
Mrs. Jesse Peck were active members of the M. E. Church 
for years, and, after coming to Madison county, united 
with the society at Wesley Chapel, near their home, and 
always attended that church, and were pillars to that early 
and well knowai church in Richland township. Mr. Peck 
was a Republican, but quiet and not offensive, though 
determined in his notions. He died April 7, 1867, and is 
buried in the Anderson cemetery. Mrs. Peck died May 
1 1, 1889, and is also buried at the Anderson cemetery. 

The following are the names of Mr. and Mrs. Peck's 
children : Catharine, born September 4, 1847 ; married to 
John C. Matthews. Mar}- A., born November 12, 1849; 
married to James Laws. She is deceased and buried at 
the Anderson cemetery. Sarah M., born December 13, 
1851 ; single. William H., born September 24, 1854; 
deceased and buried at x\nderson cemetery. Alexander 
M., born September 2, 1855 ; married first to Ida Black- 
ledge. She died April 3, 1887, and is buried at Anderson 
cemetery. He was again married to Mrs. Sarah E. Piper, 
daughter of Jesse Hall. Alice J., born April 15, 1858; 
deceased and buried at Anderson cemetery. John H. ; 
married to Nancy A. Ballard. Thomas, born February 
14, 1863 ; deceased and buried at Anderson cemetery. 
Jesse F., born November 14, 1864. 

JOHN HICKEY. 

One of the grand men I desire to notice in my book is 
the one whose name heads this sketch. Mr. Hickey was 
born in Widow, Ireland, in the year 1825. His early 
years were spent on a farm, near his native home, where 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 75 

he laid the foundation for industry and economy that has 
characterized the man since. In the 3-ear.i849 he came to 
America, first settling in Chester county, Pa., where he 
remained five years. Here he met his wife, or who proved 
to be soon after, in the year 185 1. She was a grand, good 
woman, and proved to be all through her lite. Her name 
was Marie Cavenaugh. Soon after marriage, in 1853, this 
worthy couple came to Anderson, Ind., poor and but little 
of this world's goods, but plenty of nerve and vim to make 
a grand effort for a start in the world. This effort was 
made, and with the result that always comes to those who 
practice strict industry and economv, as Mr. and Mrs. 
Hickey did, as many ot the citizens of Anderson and 
vicinity will readily testify. Mr. and Mrs. H. began life 
in their new home, Anderson, in a small way, keeping a 
groeery and restaurant. In this business they continued 
for some fifteen years, when they bought a farm just south 
of the city, and here erected a home that continued imtil 
the death of Mrs. Hickey, January 11, 1894. This was a 
sorrowful day for Mr. II. and their many friends, their 
delightful home broken up forever. 

When gas was discovered in Anderson, Mr. Hickey^ 
stirred with a desire to see his adopted city grow in impor- 
tance with the surroundings, determined to make out of 
his farm f<n addition to Anderson, which he did in 1888, 
called Avondale. Several acres were platted and laid out 
and improved, till it is to-da}' (1894) one of the most desir- 
able additions to the city. 

During those fifteen years of the married life of Mr. 
and Mrs. Hickey prosperity came to them, and their home 
was surrounded witii all that goes to make one pleasant. 
After the death of Mrs. H. he desired to set apart a portion 
of his estate for charitable purposes, and several acres^ 
including the home, were given for that purpose. Early 
in the summer of 1894 he founded what is known as St. 
John's hospital, to be under the care of the Sisters of 




HON. M. M. DUNLAP, 
Mayor Anderson, Ind, 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIE:s. 77 

Mercy, but is not confined to the Catholic Church strictly,, 
and to-day (1894) commodious buildings are being erected 
for the treatment of the sick and unfortunate. When the 
buildings are completed and the surroundings fitted up it 
will be one of the most delighttul and healthful locations 
that could possibly be selected. Had Mr. H. studied all 
his life how to give a portion of his ample means that might 
result in good, he could not have chosen a better field than 
this laudable enterprise. His enterprise does not stop here, 
for he has always taken great interest in what was going 
on. He built what is known as the Hickey House, on 
Meridian street, near the Big Four depot, that will also 
stand as a lasting monument to his enterprise. 

Mrs. Hickev lived to see the little village of Anderson 
become a city of twenty thousand people ; her home, once 
in the country, built up all around with houses and manu- 
factories, railroads built and hundreds of improvements she 
little dreamed of when she arrived here in 1853. No 
children were born to them, but in the future there will be 
children that will rise up and bless their memories. 

ALEXANDER M. PECK. 

Among the active and progressive ycung men of Mad- 
ison caunty I do not wish to forget Mr. Peck, son of the 
late Jesse Peck, of Richland township. Alexander M. was 
born in Tippecanoe county, Ind., September 2, 1855, ^^^ 
when a few months old came with his parents to Madison 
county, where he has since lived. He was first married to 
Ida Blackledge, daughter of James Blackledge. She died 
April 3, 1887, and is buried at Anderson cemetery. His 
first wife's children's names are Chester F., born August 8, 
1880 ; Nellie J., born January 10, 1883; Jesse M., born 
May II, 1885. Mr. Peck was married the second time to 
Mrs. Sarah E. Piper, daughter of Jesse Hall, of Monroe 
township. She was born August 14, 1856. They were 
married August 26, 2888. The names of the children by 



78 THE PIONEERS OF 

this marriage are John A,, born June 6, 1889; Chinde A., 
born June 10, 1891. 

Mr. and Mrs. Peck belong to the M. E. Church, and 
stand high in their locality. 

SHADRACH FURGASON. 

Mr. F. was born in Ross count}-, Ohio, August 9, 
1825, son of Eli F. Furgason. His mother's name before 
marriage was Catharine Gates. Shadrach Furgason was 
married to Mar}- Furgason in 1855. She was born in 
Green county Ohio, January 5, 1825, daughter of Clark 
Furgason. Shadrach Furgason came to Madison county, 
Indiana, in 1855, and settled in Monroe township, two miles 
soutn of Alexandria. Mr. and Mrs. Furgason were mar- 
ried b}- the Rev. Granville Moody. Children's names are 
Albert W., born in Green county Ohio ; died February 11, 
1858. Oliver M., died March 12, 1861. Harry G., born 
April 2, 1863 ; married to Amanda Ross. Sarah E., born 
November 13, 1865. James E., born September 30, 1869 ; 
married to Maud Rhoton. 

Mr. Furgason is a Republican, and stands deservedly 

high in his locality and throughout the county. He owns 

a good farm two miles S"outh of Alexandria, in Monroe 

township, near the railroad running from Anderson to 

Alexandria ; also near the line connecting these places. 

Mr. F. is a well made man, near six feet high, and florid 

complexion. 

PETER HOSIER. 

Mr. Hosier resides on his splendid farm, seven miles 
north-west of Anderson, on the north bank of White river. 
He was born in Rush county, Ind., November 9, 1834, ^^^ 
of Malon Hosier. His mother's name was Nancy Goss- 
nell. He was married to Sarah J. Cunningham November 
19, 1855, daughter of George Cunningham, one of the 
early settlers of Madison county. Mrs. Hosier was born 
in Madison county November 21, 1829. The following 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 79 

are the names of ]Mr. and Mrs. Hosier's children : Nancy, 
born September 12, 1856; married to William Parsons; 
resides in Madison county. Malinda, born January 24, 
1858 : married to Samuel Wise ; resides in Madison count}-. 
Mr. Hosier is a good farmer, and has made it a success, 
and lives at home. He joined the Masonic order at Per- 
kinsville, Ind., October, 1862, and is also a member of the 
Chapter and Council. He is also a member of the I. O. O. 
F. at Perkinsville. Mr. H. is a strong Democrat. His 
father died, October, 1888. Mrs. H. died in 1881, and is 
buried at Perkinsville cemetery. Mrs, H.'s father died, 
August, 1861, and is buried at the Coy cemetery, in Jack- 
son township. Her mother died, January, 1861, and is 
also buried at the Coy, cemetery. 

JOHN W. ETSLER. 

John Ex, as we call him, was born in Indianapolis, 
September 16, 1838. His father's name was Lloyd Etsler. 
His mother's name was Hannah Vessell. John W. was 
married to Rebecca A. Carr, November 4, 1869. She was 
born in Hamilton county, Ind., January 17, 1847. Their 
children's names are Charles P., born September i, 1870 ; 
Laura, born June, 1872 ; Walter C, born May, 1874. 

Mr. Etsler learned the shoemaker's trade in the city of 
his birth, and in 1855 came to Perkinsville, Ind., and 
started a shop, and has ever since carried on there. During 
the late war of 1861-5 he enlisted in Company D, Fifty- 
eighth Indiana volunteers ; was in the battle of Nashville, 
Tenn. He was discharged at Louisville, Ky., in 1865. I 
have known Mr. E. since 1874. A capital, good fellow, 
whose acquaintance I highly prize. A live RepubHcan, 
industrious, and a splendid workman. Don't fail to call 
and see John when in Perkinsville, whose latch string is 
alwa3's out to his many friends. 

JONATHAN DELOUGHTER. 

Mr. D. was born June i, 1845, son of Mr. Jonathan 



So THE PIONEERS OF 

Deloughter, one of the pioneers of Madison county, Ind, 
His mother's name was Elizabeth Whitmore. He was 
married to Elizabeth E. Johnson, daughter of J. J. Johnson, 
December 6, 1868. Mr. Johnson died October 9, 1892 ; is 
buried at Pendleton. Mrs. Jonathan Deloughter was born 
in Rush county, Ind, September 27, 185 1. The following 
are the names of their children: John J., born February 
14, 1871 ; William M., born January 2, 1873; Dessie E., 
born March 19, 1877, Bertha, born September 25, 1881 ; 
James L., born April 21, 1884; Walter A., born May 28, 
1886 : Maggie P., born July 3, 1889. 

Mr. D. owns a fine farm of 132 acres, five miles west 
of Anderson, in Ston^^-Creek township, where he has 
resided since 1870, and erected a fine, substantial brick 
house soon after. Mr. and Mrs. D. belong to the Chris- 
tian Church, and stand high among their fellow-citizens. 
He is a good, practical farmer, and has his farm in good 
order. He is a Democrat, and attends strictly to his own 
business. Mr. D.'s father died in 1886. His mother died 
July 27, 1870. Both buried at the Woodward cemeter}-. 

HON. MANSON U. JOHNSON. 

Mr. Johnson, one of the active young men of Madison 
county, Ind., was born in Randolph count}, Ind., October 
20, 1864, son of Joseph Johnson, of A^anburen township, 
who came to Madison county from Randolph count}- some 
twenty years ago. When young Manson was a mere boy 
here in the district schools he laid the foundation for a more 
extended and useful education. At the age of sixteen 
years he entered the higher schools at Marion, Ind. After- 
wards he attended school under the tutorship of Prof. W. 
M. Croan, also a Madison county boy, but now president 
of a high college at Lincoln, Nebraska. About this time 
Mr. Johnson had decided to make teaching his avocation, 
and at once prepared himself to teach, and passed a suc- 
cessful examination to procin^e a six months' license, and 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 8l 

began his first school. He afterwards taught several 
successful schools in Vanburen and adjoining townships. 
Obtaining a three-year license, he step by step rose higher 
and higher, till he was elected County Superintendent of 
the schools of Madison, September, 1894, and at this 
writing is at the head of the schools of his adopted county. 
He previously attended the college at Bloomington, Ind., 
for a term of years. On the nth day of September, 1880, 
he was married to Miss Alice E. Thone. Two children 
were born to them, Lena C. and Mabel M. Mrs. Johnson, 
a grand, good woman, died of consumption, August 27, 
1891, just entering strong womanhood and usefulness. 

At one time Mr. Johnson had charge of the Acton, 
Ind., schools, having graduated at Bloomington Septem- 
ber II, 1890. He has made social science a special study, 
and is a deep reasoner and writer. During the days of 
college and teaching he found time to publish a book, enti- 
tled "The Tariff,'' ^ valuable work of six hundred pages, 
that reflects credit on him. The book has had an extensive 
sale, and is in the libraries of many of his friends of the 
State and elsewhere. After the death of his wife he made 
his home in Marion county, and was elected as a represen- 
tative of that county to the State Legislature in 1892, and 
served creditably to all concerned. 

Mr. Johnson is a fine speaker on the stump, and his 
eloquence has charmed and profited many who have heard 
him. He is a Democrat of deep convictions of its reliable 
principles, taught by Jeflerson, Jackson and others down 
the line of this grand old party. See his portrait on 
another page of this work. 

JAMES M. ANDERSON, 

Son of Samuel S. Anderson, and grandson of John 
Andeison, one of the pioneers of Hamilton county, Ind. 
Samuel S. Anderson was born in Hamilton county in 1836. 
Mrs. S. S. Anderson was born in Madison county, Ind., 

4 



82 THE PIONEERS OI-" 

daughter of George McClintock. James M. Anderson was 
born in Ston^'-Creek township, June 7, 1862 ; married to 
Viola Woh', daughter of William Wolf. Her mother's 
name was Isabel Gwinn. Viola was born July 23, 1862. 
They were married March 13, 1884. The following are 
the names of their children: Hanson H., born October 
13, 1887 ; Willis S., born April 6, 1889. 

Mr. Anderson was elected Township Trustee in 1888 
over Jasper Hutlman b}' a majority of five votes, and in 
1890 re-elected by a vote of two. He was elected a Dem- 
ocrat, to which he has alwa3'S acted. Both Mr. and Mrs. 
A. belong to the M. E. Church, and are highly esteemed 
all over the county. Their home is in Stony-Creek town- 
ship, six miles west of Anderson. 

GEORGE GILMORE. 

Mr. G. resides five miles west of the city of Anderson, 
in Stony-Creek township, and owns one of the prettiest 
farms in the township, and has erected substantial buildings 
thereon. His brick house is a model of beaut}^, inside and 
outside, with a beautiful lawn on the north side and a 
handsome garden and tmit orchard on the east. In fact, 
the hand of taste has been displa3-ed here in ever}^ direc- 
tion. Mr. and Mrs. G. moved here in the woods some 
thirty years ago, then in the prime of life, and their best 
energies have been put forth to make this grand home. 
They have been successful in their efforts, but it has cost 
toil and mone}^ and at times the surroundings looked dark 
and dreary. Little by little the fields grew larger, the tim- 
ber disappeared, fruit trees were planted, vines trained, 
flowers came, and to-day as I write this poor sketch their 
home is a paradise on earth. 

Mr. Gilmore was born in Adams township, Madison 
county, Ind., on a bright May morning long ago, the 13th, 
1830, son of Morris Gilmore, who came from Virginia in 
1829, settling on the south bank of Fall creek, one mile 
east of New Columbus, and where he died December, 1879. 



MADISON AM) HANCOCK COUNTIES. S3 

He was born in \"irginia January 2, 1804. Mis wife, Eliz- 
abeth Blazier, was born in Gallia county, Ohio. She died 
JMarch, 1881 : both buried at the old Gilmore cemeter}-, 
near their old home, where Grandfather Hugh Gilmore 
and wife are also buried. Hugh Gilmore was killed while 
clearing off the cemeter}', December 27, 1834. Mrs. Hugh 
Gilmore died February 19, 1833. Mrs. Geo. Gilmore was 
born in Pennsylvania October 28, 183 1, daughter of Jacob 
Fesler, who came to Madison count}^ in 1843, and died 
March 3, 1882. His wife, formerly Margaret Gulp, died 
February, 1869. Both are buried at the old Baptist ceme- 
tery, west of New Columbus. 

Mr. and Mrs. George Gilmore were married in Madi- 
son count}', Ind., July 16, 1853, by Saul Reger. The 
following are the names of their children : Jacob, born 
INIa}' 7, 1854 '■> married to Mary A. Smith. Elizabeth, born 
February 16, 1859 ' m^ii'^ed to George McClintock. Nor- 
ris, born January 10, 1868 ; married to Mary L. x\bbott. 
Mary, born September 30, 1871. Mr. and Mrs. G. belong 
to the M. E. Church, and are held in the highest esteem 
whereyer known. Mr. G. is a Republican, and lost a 
brother (Morris) in the army. The tbllowing are the names 
of his brothers and sisters: Hugh, Phillip, Roman, Van, 
John and Morris (twins), Elizabeth, Reve, Mary M. and 
Eveline L. The following are the names of Mrs. Gilmore's 
brothers and sisters : George, Elizabeth, Sarah A., Mary, 
Rebecca, John H. and Hiram. Of the former family the 
following are deceased : Hugh, Morris and Pliillip. Of 
the latter, George, Rebecca and John H. Roman Gilmore 
married Miss Hess, daughter of Michael Hess. Van mar- 
ried Miss Wagoner. John first married Miss Vanwinkle ; 
second time a daughter of Mr. Gwinn. Mary M. mrrried 
Harvey Hollenbeck. Evaline L., single. George Fesler 
married Mary Davis. Rebecca married James Slaughter. 
David married Mrs. Dr. Bare. Sarah A. married W. 
H. Rumler, and one married Samuel Gra^". 




HON. CHARLES L. HENRY. 

Member Fifty-fourth Congress, Elected November 6, 1894. 

Resides at Anderson. Ind. 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTI?:S. 85 

JACOB KOEHLER. 

Mr. Koehler was born in Butler count}', Ohio, May 12, 
1834, ^0^^ of Adam Koehler; mother's name was Margaret 
Fenter : came from Germany in 1839. Jacob was married 
to Martha J. Teple, April 10, 1872, in Ohio. Her father's 
name was William Teple. Mrs. Margaret M. Koehler 
died at her home, five miles north-west of the city of 
Anderson, October 20, 1889, and is buried at the Anderson 
cemetery. The following are the names of their children : 
Maggie M., born November 18, 1872, in Butler county, 
Ohio; died in infancy. Charles, born 1873. Minnie B., 
born December 15, 1874. Florence M., born December 
30, 1875. Myrtle A., born March, 1872. Mary A., born 
Juh' 21, 1878. Chester C, born Februar}-, 1881 ; died 
October, 188 1 ; buried at the Moss cemetery. Grace E., 
born Jul}' 4, 1883. Mrs. Koehler was born January 9, 
1852, in Ohio. 

Mr. Koehler enlisted in the One Hundred and Sixty- 
seventh Ohio Regiment, Company K, in 1864, at Hamilton, 
Ohio, Capt. D. K. Zeller, Col. Thomas Moore, and was 
discharged September 8, 1864. He is a staunch Republi- 
can, and was nominated on the ticket for Sheriff in 1878, 
and ran many votes ahead of the ticket, but was defeated. 
He joined the Masonic order in 1868 at Hamilton, Ohio, 
and loves its teachings. 

NATHAN F. YOUNG. 

Mr. Young resides in Perkinsville, Ind., where he has 
lived for several years. He was born in Huntington, N. 
J., July 9, 1833, son of Peter Young. His mother's name 
before marriage was Ollie Conover. Nathan came to Mad- 
ison county Ind., in 1842. He was married to Elizabeth 
Anderson, daughter of William Anderson. She was born 
in Hamilton county, Ind., in 1843, died May 8, 1868, and 
is buried at Perkinsville. Four children w^ere born to Mr. 
and Mrs. Young by this marriage, Josephine, married to 



86 THE PIONEERS OF 

O. N. Tranbarger ; Ansell, married to Miss Baughman ; 
resides in Kansas; Cynthia A., single; Thomas, single. 
Mr. Young was the second time married to Louisa Ander- 
son, in April, 1869. Two children were born to them 
(twins), George E. and Edwin E. The}' reside in Indian- 
apolis. 

Mr. Young enlisted in Company E, Eleventh Indiana 
regiment, earl}^ in 1865, and was discharged July 26^ 
1865, at Indianapolis. Mr. Y. is a carpenter by trade, 
and politically a Republican. In the army he was on duty 
at Baltimore,' Md. His Colonel, Daniel McCauley, Cap- 
tain, John McCauley. 

WILLIAM MILTON KING. 

Among the live, progressive men of Madison county I 
do not wish to forget Mr. King, who resides three miles 
south of Alexandria and four miles west of Gilman, in 
Monroe township. He came to this place in 1874, ^^^ ^^^ 
1892 erected a tine dwelHng house on his well cultivated 
farm, where he has things all in good shape. He is the 
son of Daniel King. His mother's name before marriage 
was Mariah McAllister. The family lived in Rush county, 
Ird., where Milton was born, August 10, 1830. On Janu- 
ary 13, 1867, he was married to Cynthia Norris, daughter 
of the late Stephen Norris, one of the pioneers of Madison 
county. Her mother's name was Lienor Noble. Mrs. 
King was born June 29, 183 1. Their children's names are 
Willard P., Daniel S. and Mariah and Lienor, twins. 

Mr. King is a Democrat, an active citizen, and alive 
to the best interests of his county. I trust this famil}- may 
live long to enjoy their bright, sunn}- home. 

DAVID WINDSOR. 

Mr. Windsor resides midway between Alexandria and 
Gilman, and near the Lake Erie railroad, in Monroe town- 
ship. He was born in the old tar State, North Carolina, 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 87 

July 12, 1840. His father's name was W. W. Windsor. 
His mother's name before marriage was Sarah Dav. Mr. 
and Mrs. David Windsor were married February 6, 1886. 
She was born in Madison county, Ind., December 27, 1846, 
daughter of John G. Wilson. Her mother's name was 
Susan Busby, daughter of Isaac Busb}', an early settler of 
Madison county. 

David Windsor and wife have no children, and are 
highly respected members of society, and also of the 
Baptist Church at Mt. Pisgah. Mr. Windsor enlisted in 
Company D, Thirty-fourth Indiana volunteers, October, 
1864 ; \yas in the battle of Palmetto Ranch, but mosth' on 
post duty ; was discharged at Brownsville, Texas, October 
14, 1865. His captain's name was Joshua Fussell, Col. 
Jones. They have a pleasant home, where they welcome 
their many friends. 

IRA F. MILLER. 

Mr. Miller resides in Oilman, Monroe township, Mad- 
ison county, near the Delaware county line. He came 
here in 1875, where he and his father, Jacob Miller, 
operated a general store for several years. His mother's 
name before marriage was Harriet Worley. Ira F. was 
married to Josie Heagy, October 13, 1886. She was born 
June 20, 1857, daughter of Weams Heagy, ex-Treasurer 
of Madison county, and one of the foremost men in the 
county, w^here he has resided so long. 

Mr. Miller is a staunch Democrat, an active man, and 
is identified with Oilman's best interest, where he ow^ns a 
tine farm. Mrs. Miller is a fine conversationalist, and is 
very popular among her man}- friends. No children have 
been born to them. 

THOMAS WHITEHEAD. 

Tom lives in Perkinsville, near where he was born, on 
the 26th day of March, 1848, son of William Whitehead, 



<5» THE PIONEERS OF 

who was born in Pennsylvania in 1814; died March 25, 
1881, near Perkinsville. Thomas' mother is yet Hving in 
Perkinsville. Her tbrmer name was Sarah Miller, born in 
Columbus, Ohio. Thomas was raised on a farm, but he 
has been deprived of the use of his limbs, and has nearl}' 
all his life been a cripple. He has given his attention to 
the study of the horse and his diseases, and is a successful 
surgeon in that line. Tom is a fine fellow, and has noth- 
ing too good for his many friends. Though afflicted, he 
looks on bright side of things, and believes. in the end all 
matters will be righted up. A Democrat of the strictest 
kind. Call and see Tom when in Perkinsville. 
WILLIAM L. JONES. 

Mr. Jones w'as born on Lick creek, Green township, 
Madison county, Ind., Jul}- 13, 1841, son of Wesle}- Jones, 
one of the early settlers of that locality. William L. Jones 
was married to Lavina Guy, daughter of Vansant Guy, in 
1850. They had one child, Charles B., born September, 
1874; died in 1880 ; is buried at the Menden cemetery, in 
Madison count}^ Mrs. Jones died January 5, 1876, and is 
also buried at Menden. Mr. Jones was the second time 
married to Mrs. Margaret J. Cripe, daughter of Thomas 
Wilson, of Lafayette township, Madison county, March 
10, 1887. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jones now reside seven miles north of 
Anderson, near the railroad. Mr. Jones enlisted in the 
Second Indiana Cavalry, Company D, Capt. Conwell, 
December, 1863, and served till the close of the war; was 
mostly in the wagon and transportation department in the 
South-west. Is a Republican, and belongs to the G. A. 
R. at Anderson. Mrs. Jones was born in 1848, in Madi- 
son, Ind. Mr. and Mrs. Jones stand deservedly high 
wherever known. 

REUBEN NEESE. 

Mr. Neese resides in Perkinsville, Ind., and is engaged 
in keeping a general store there, and is postmaster there, 



MAUISON AND HAXCOCK COUNTIES. 89 

jsince 1889, when he was appointed as a Republican, lie 
is a son of Jacob Neese, who was an earl}^ citizen of Mad- 
ison county, Ind. His mother's name was Sarah Moore. 
Reuben Neese was born in Madison count}^ January 24, 
1847, and was brought up on a farm, with a practical edu- 
cation ; was married to Clara Neese, April 12, 1866. They 
had one child, John S., born July 26, 1868 ; died February 
18, 1891 ; buried at the Neese cemeter}^, in Jackson town- 
ship. Mr. Neese commenced business in Perkinsville in 
1889 in the old stand of, Thomas Beckwith. In 1882 he 
associated with him Oscar Henn. Mr. Neese is a member 
of the order of Red Men, No. 134, at Perkinsville. Mrs. 
Neese was born September 30, 1843. 

WILLIAM BALL. 

Mr. Ball was born in Fayette county, Ind., April 22, 
1822, son of Dr. D; B, Ball ; mother's name was Rachel 
Denman. She was raised in Georgia ; Dr. B. in Pennsyl- 
vania ; buried at Lick Creek cemetery, in Rush county, 
Ind. William Ball was married to Mary McCreary Janu- 
ary 21, 1847, daughter of Robert McCreary; mother's 
name was Selina Saxon ; married by Richard Nash, in 
Rush county, Ind. Children's names : Caroline, born 
January 9, 1848 ; married to Solomon Call. Prudence A., 
born February 18, 185 1 ; married to Andrew Greenlee. 
Robert E., born April i , 1859 ' married to Edith Runion. 

Mr. William Ball came to Boone township, Madison 
county, October, 1854, ^vhere he now resides and owns a 
line farm and good buildings, and is highly esteemed 
wherever known. He and his wife are members of the 
Baptist Church at New Harmony, near their home, and 
have been for many years. Thanks to this family for 
kindness at their hospitable home. Mr. Ball resides about 
three miles south-east of Rigdon and two miles south of 
the Grant county line, and eighteen miles north of Ander- 
son, Ind. 



90 THE PIONEERS OF 

ELI FURGASON. 

Mr. Furgason was born in Highland county, Ohio, 
July 24, 1840, son of David Furgason and Annie Gates, 
and was maried to Sophia Lyons January 26, i87i,by 
George Jenkins. She was born October 20, 1852. Her 
mother's name before marriage was Rachel Woods ; fath- 
er's name William Lyons. Mr. Furgason enlisted in 
Company A, Second Ohio Heavy Artillery, June, 1863 ; 
was in many hard fought battles, such as Strawberry 
Plains, Cleveland and others ; was discharged at Nashville, 
Tenn., August, 1865. He came to Madison county in 
1865, and resides three miles south-east of Alexandria. 
He is a Republican. Children's names: John E., born 
November 10, 1871 ; Mary A., born December 3, 1873 ; 
Emma B., born August 20, 1878; Albert P., born March 
7, 1880; George, born Februar}^ 27, 1883. 

REV. ITHAMER V. McCARTY. 

Mr. McCarty was born in Hancock county, Ind., on 
the 25th day of October, 1853, son of B. F. McCarty, Sr., 
who came to Hancock county from Tennessee about the 
year 1840. His mother's name before marriage was Ange- 
line Cook, daughter of Joel Cook, Sr., who came from 
Virginia in 1830, and settled on upper Sugar creek. Brown 
township, where he lived and died in 1870. He was born 
in Virginia in 1795. Joel Cook's first wife's name was 
Nancy Farley. She died in 1835, soon after they came to 
the State. Rev. McCarty was married to Etta Whitinger, 
January 3r, 1883. She was born February 16, 1866. Her 
mother, formerly Sarah G. Willis, died at Anderson, Ind., 
February 9, 1893, and is buried at the Anderson cemetery. 
Etta's father, Jerry Whitinger, was born in Wayne county, 
Ind., March 8, 1821 , They were married in Laporte, Ind., 
August I, 1854, and soon after came to Madison county, 
where they have resided ever since. 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUXTIKS. 9 1 

B. F. IVrcCarty, Sr., was for many years a prominent 
man in Hancock county, where he served twelve years as 
Justice of the Peace, to the entire satisfaction of the people 
there. He has been a resident of North Anderson since 
1878. Was born in Tennessee May 20, 1820. 

Rev. Ithamer McCarty attended school and received a 
good common education, and early in life joined the U. I^. 
Church. In 1889 he was dul}" licensed to preach, and has 
been thus engaged since that time. He is a good speaker 
and quite well informed on the scriptures ; has had good 
success, and is gladl}' received wherever sent to labor. 
Mr. McCarty in person is about live feet seven inches high, 
of line appearance, and a splendid tire-side talker, as well as 
able in the pulpit. He has preached successfully at Marion, 
Wabash, Pendleton, and Anderson. I have known him 
from boyhood, -and can attest his worthiness as a citizen 
and minister of the gospel. He is a brother of John, Joel, 
Benjamin F., Jasper N., Sarah J. and Nancy Wisehart. 

ADAM GISSE. 

This old veteran first saw the light of day in the grand 
State of Pennsylvania on the 15th day of Februar}^ 1824. 
Came to the State of Indiana in 1852, where he has since 
resided. He first came to Connersville, where he resided 
till 1857, when he became a citizen of Madison county, 
where he now (1893) resides, at Mudsack, a town on the 
Lake Erie and Western railroad, four miles west of Alex- 
andria. Mr. Gisse was first married in Pennsylvania in 
December, 1849, to Sarah Morgan. She was born in 
Pennsylvania in 1826, and died there in 185 1. He was 
again married to Ruth McKinnan in 1858. She was born 
in Kentucky in 1840, and died August 28, 187 1 ; is buried 
at Pendleton. The following are his children's names: 
Emma Alice, born 1859; died 1862 ; buried at Pendleton. 
Ida E. L., born August 26, 1891 ; married to Henry Ger- 
land ; he was born in Cincinnati, O., resides in Kentucky. 





GEORGE M. BALLARD, 
Attorney. Anderson, Ind. 



DAVID W. WOOD. 
Attorney, Anderson, Ind. 




ESTA A. MAKEPIECE, 
Augusta. Kansas. 




■. 


- 






i 





EX- J UDGE M. A. CHIPMAN, 
Anderson, Ind. 



WILLIAM A. KITTINGER, 
Attorney, Anderson, Ind. 



.AIADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 93 

Elizabeth K., born September 26, 1S79. J*-^^"*"? born Julv 
15, 1865, in Pendleton. 

Mr. Gisse enlisted in Company A, Nineteenth Indiana 
Volunteers, "Iron Brigade," July 5, 1861, Captain A. I. 
i\Iakepeace, Colonel Sol Meredith, and was in the follow- 
ing battles : Gainesville, Gettysburg, Fredericksburg, Bull 
Run, Pittsbiu^g Landing, Laurel Mill, Panamaka, Ciiicka- 
mauga and Mine Run. He was discharged at Petersburg, 
Va., September 12, 1864. On the 26th da}^ of Jul}-, 1873, 
he was married to Mary Cox. Mr. G. is a well posted 
man, a great reader, well informed on all subjects, and a 
carpenter b}' trade. He served four years as Justice of the 
Peace, and is a Democrat of the Jacksonian school. In 
person he is rather under medium size, active for a man ot* 
his age, and has good features. He is full of life and 
enjo3s good company. Call and see the old comrade. 

URIAH C. VERMILLION, 

Son of Jesse and Catharine (Justice) Vermillion, was 
born in Indiana on August 2, 1841. He received a good 
common education at the schools of his day, and has 
devoted his time and talents to farming, his chosen occupa- 
tion, and in which he has been successful. He has a large 
tract of land, on which he has erected good buildings. He 
has all the improved machinery with which to operate his 
broad fields. He is also identified in the banking business 
at Alexandria and Anderson ; is a devoted Mason, and 
strongly attached to this ancient order, and a Democrat of 
the first water. Mr. V. was married October i, 1862, to 
Mary Morrow, who was born April 30, 1845, in Ohio. She 
died May 26, 1877, just in the prime of life. She is buried 
at the Holston cemetery. 

The following are the names of their children : Jesse 
L., married to Cary Swank, daughter of D. W. Swank, 
of Anderson. Jesse is largely interested in the bank at 
Anderson, and has been book-keeper many years, where 



94 'JTHE PIONEERS OF 

he has the confidence of all. He was born August 7, 
1864. Rozetta, born July 26, 1869; died October 6, 1869. 
Alonzo, born March 14, 1869; died September 13, 1871. 
Vesper A., born February 26, 187 1. Eddie F., born 
December 30, 1874. The deceased members are buried at 
the Holston cemetery, Richland township. 

Uriah C. Vermillion is a Democrat and was made a 
Mason at Alexandria in 1874. ^^ resides ten miles north- 
east of the city of Anderson and five miles south-east of 
Alexandria. He is a brother of Chaney and Samuel Ver- 
million and half brother of Mrs. Daniel Tinker, of Lapel, 
Ind. I am indebted to U. C. for man\' acts of kindness. 

JOSEPH DOWNHAM. 

In writing the pioneers I must not forget Mr. Down- 
ham, one of the sturdy farmers of Jackson township, 
Madison county, Ind., who resides about one and a half 
miles north-east of Perkinsville, on the north bank of White 
river. Here he owns a fine farm, a part of which is bottom 
land and a portion high ground, overlooking the river. 
Here Mr. D. has been living some thirt3'-five 3'ears, or the 
best days of his life, being just in his prime when he settled 
here in 1858. He was born in the State of Delaware, 
December 17, 1829, in Kent county. On March 2, 1859, 
he was married to Sarah L3^kins. She died August 11, 
1859, '^^^'^ '^^ buried at the Perkinsville cemetery. He was 
the second time married to Charlotte Holloway, February 
2, i860. She was born July i, 1844. Her father's name 
was E. Holloway ; her mother's name before marriage was 
Nanc}^ Justice. Children's names : Mary A., born March 
10, 1861 ; married to John Carty ; resides in Hamilton 
county, Ind. Joseph, born September 19, 1862 ; died April 
28, 1864 ; buried at Perkinsville cemeter}-. Charles, born 
July 5, 1864; married to Delia Thomas; he died April 6, 
1893. Lizzie, born October 30, 1866 ; married to Sherman 
Carey. John and James, twins, born April 28, 1869. James 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 95 

died December, 187 1. Mr. Downham's father died in 
1891. Mrs. Dovvnham died in the State of Delaware in 
1884. 

Joseph Downham, the subject of this sketch, is a hi^h 
minded, honorable gentleman ; does his own thinking and 
reading, and is a fine fire-side talker. He is liberal in his 
dealings with the people, and a fine thinker on all subjects. 

MRS. NANCY ECKHART. 

Among the comparative!}' few women I will write of 
in this work I can not forget Mrs. Eckhart, who I knew in 
life and, with man}' others, lament in death. She is sleep- 
ing in the beautiful cemetery at Anderson, where her hus- 
band erected a suitable monument to her memory. She 
possessed many of the noble traits of a true christian 
woman, which she was. Her funeral was one of the larofest 
ever seen in Anderson. She left an influence behind that 
will not soon be lost, but, like the perfume of the choicest 
flowers, come to remind us that her life was not spent in 
vain. 

Nancy Swit't was born in Henry county, Indiana, 
August 28, 1857, daughter of the late Ham Swift. When 
quite young she came with her parents to Anderson, where 
she lived up to the time of her death, July 29, 1893. She 
w^as married to John Eckhart October 14, 1883, with whom 
she lived happilv during their wedded life. They had one 
child, Mabel L., born in 1884. Mrs. E.'s funeral was 
preached at the Christian Church in Anderson by Elder 
Shoemaker to a large concourse of people. 

WASHINGTON PETTIGREW, 

Though not strictly speaking a pioneer, came when 
the county was just beginning to develop into what it is 
now. He first settled on Fall creek, about five miles 
south-west of Pendleton, on what was then known as the 
Col. Johnson farm in 1850. Here he lived till his death. 



96 THE PIONEERS OF 

September 29, 1877, and is buried at the Beech Grove 
cemetery, some two miles north-west of the old farm. His 
was known as one of the best farms in Madison count}-, 
and to-day stands second to none, made so by his hard 
work and untiring industr\% Here he erected good build- 
ings and lived at home for many years before his death. 
He was born in Rockford count}^ Va., November 15, 1801 ; 
was married to Mar\' Parson in 1825, who was born Octo- 
ber 20, 1807. Following are the names of their children. 
The four oldest were born in Virginia, the rest in Green 
county Ohio: John, born September 17, 1826; married to 
Sarah Jones April 14, 1853. Samuel, born February 15, 
1828 ; married to Mary J. Coheld ; he died in 1873 ; buried 
at the Jones cemetery'. Hetlie, born in 1830; married to 
Benjamin Folk. George, born in March, 183 1 ; married 
Elizabeth Williams ; he died in 1883, and buried at Beech 
Grove ; she is also dead, and buried at the Crossly ceme- 
tery. Jane, born in 1832 ; married to John H. Cottell ; she 
died in 1878 ; is buried at Beech Grove cemetery. William, 
born in 1833 5 married to Ellen Miller ; she is dead and 
buried at Pendleton. David, born June 11, 1837 5 rnarried 
to Rebecca Parsons in Ohio in 1858 ; she was born in Ohio 
August 26, 1837 '•> I't'side on part of the old farm. Francis 
M., born June 22, 1839; ni'ii"i"ied to Nancy Nicholson. 
Nanc}', born May 6, 1840; married to Harper Parsons. 
Robert, born Ma}" 13, 1843 ; married to Sarah Summers, 
July, 1869 ; she is dead and buried at the Nicholson ceme- 
tery. Robert was again married to Elizabeth McNatt ; 
reside in Anderson. He was in the late war. Company I, 
Forty-third Indiana regiment ; discharged a<- Indianapolis 
September 22, 1865. Elizabeth, born February, 1845; 
married to Joseph Chitwood ; reside in Missouri. Isabel, 
born February, 1848 ; married to Freeman Murry ; reside 
in Fortville. 

Mr. Pettigrew was a strong man, honest as the day 
was long, and raised a large family, who are industrious 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 97 

and hard working people. He was a Democrat of the old 
school. Mrs. P. died February, 1892, and is also buried at 
the Beech Grove cemetery. 

HENRY WAGGY, 

One of ^Madison county's grand old pioneers, was born 
in Pendleton county. West Virginia, March 16, 1814, son 
of Abraham Waggy, who was in the Revolutionar}^ war. 
Henry Waggy came to Madison county, Ind., in 1838, and 
settled four miles south of x'Vnderson, where he died the 
loth of August, 1893. No man ever stood higher than 
Mr..W., and was an industrious, temperate man all his life. 
He made a fine farm out of the green woods, and at the 
time of his death was in fine circumstances, owning several 
hundred acres of land near where is buried, at what is 
known as the Waggy or Wilson cemetery. Mr. W. was 
married to Martha Wilson in 1840. She was the daughter 
of Dempsy Wilson, born in North Carolina September 31, 
1823, and came with her parents to Madison county when 
a girl in her teens. She died August 12, 1859. '^^^^^^ fol- 
lowing are the names of the children born of the first 
marriage: William, born Jul}^ 10, 1841 ; married to Mar- 
garet Brothers ; both dead ; he died July 6, 1892 ; buried at 
the Whetstone cemetery. He was in the war of 1861-5 ; 
in the One Hundred and Thirtieth Regiment Indiana infan- 
try. Ellen, born in 1843 ; died in infancy. Dempsy, born 
in 1845 ; he was also in the late w^ar. Company B, One 
Hundred and Thirtieth Indiana volunteers. Sarah E., 
born in 1847 ; died at the age of sixteen years ; buried at 
the Wilson cemetery. Mary, the youngest child by his 
first wife, born about 1866; single. Milla M,, married to 
O. C. Myers ; reside in Indianapolis. 

In 1861 Henry Waggy was married to Ellen Gustin, 
formerly Ellen Dunbar, by whom he had one daughter, 
Ida, born in 1864 ; married to Newton Cartright. Mr. W. 
was a strong war man, and gave up his two sons to the 



98 THE PIONEERS OF 

army. He lived to see the war closed and many grand 
improvements come to his adopted State ; came poor and 
grew up with the county ; loved freedom, hated slavery, 
and was first, last and all the time one of our best, noble 
men. He was an old Whig and then a Republican. 

WILLIAM JOHNS, 

One of Madison county's best as well as earliest men, 
of Union township, I gladl}- notice in the Pioneer. Mr. 
Johns died October 13, 1888. He was married to Cathe- 
rine Glodfetty. She was born in Summerset county, Pa., 
October 6, 1819; died November 17, 1876. The following 
are the names of their children : Margaret J., born April 
9, 1842 ; married to David B. Sims ; he died February 23, 
1883. William E., born January 17, 1844; married to 
Nancy Dunham, October 14, 1867. Thomas A., born Jul}- 
21, 1853 ; married to Delphine Sims March 26, 1876. She 
was born May 13, 1853, in Shelby county, O. Catherine, 
born August 3, 1855 ; married to John N. McGrift' on the 
4th of July, 1875. 

The following is a notice taken from an Anderson 
paper at the time of Mr. John's death, and also a eulogy 
delivered by Hon. W. R. Myers: 

ANOTHER LANDMARK GONE. 

Last Monday, William Johns, who for more than half 
a century has been a resident of this county, died from the 
effects of a cancer. For the past eighteen months he has 
been suffering from the effects ol it, but only within the last 
ten weeks has he been contined to his room. 

Tlie funeral services were held at the famil}' residence 
in Richland township. A large concourse of friends and 
neighbors, especially of those who struggled and labored 
with Mr. Johns in the early settlement of this county — the 
pioneers — were present to pay their last respects to one of 
their number. Many friends were present from Delaware 
county. 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 99 

The interment was at the old Bronnenberg cemetery, 
near Chesterfield. At the grave Mr. W. R. Myers deliv- 
ered the following eulogy, which we publish by request: 

Mv Friends : We are as-sembled here in the abode of 
the dead to discharge the last sad rites the living can pay 
to the departed. I am here at the earnest and last request of 
the deceased. William Johns was born in Bedford county, 
Pa., September lo, 1814. His ancestors on his father's 
side were Welsh. In 1816 his parents moved to Licking 
county, Ohio. In 1830 the family moved to Madison 
comity, and settled on what has for many years been known 
as the McCltnehan farm, which is within a mile of this 
cemeterv, at which place his father died in 1833. He was 
then apprenticed to the blacksmith trade in Anderson. At 
the end of his apprenticeship he packed all his worldl}' goods 
in a handkerchief and walked to Licking county, O., and 
spent a 3'ear working at his trade. In 1836 he established 
himself in a blacksmith shop of his own in Chesterfield, where 
he conducted the business until 1845, when he abandoned 
the anvil for the plow, and purchased the farm where he 
has since lived, and where by industry and econom}- he 
has accumulated 420 acres of land, and a corresponding 
amount of personal propert}'. When he came to Indiana 
the place we stand was a wilderness, and the Red Men 
were still disputing for the mastery with their pale-faced 
foes. This spot was then on the frontier, far removed from 
the comforts of civilization. There were no churches, no 
schools, no highw^ays. His opportunities for an education 
were meager, and he received but little instruction in the 
elementary branches. In these da3^s wrestling, foot racing 
and log rollings, house and barn raisings, were the sport 
and pastime of the day, and he participated in them all with 
the zeal of a young athlete. He was thrice married. By 
his second wife, whose maiden name was Catherine Glod- 
fetty, he had four children, two girls and two boys, all of 
whom survive him. By his first and third marriages he 



lOO THE PIONEERS OF 

had no issue. He lived to see all his children comfortably 
and happily situated in life, and was the recipient of their 
tender care during his long and painful illness. For more 
than fifty-five years he has lived in this covmty. You all 
know him. Many of 3'ou have been the recipients of his 
kindness. He had his frailties and his foibles, and who of 
us all have them not? If none but those wlio are without 
blemish were permitted to participate in these last ofiices, 
this poor tenement of clay that held his immortal spirit 
until the worms and the fowls of the air had devoured it. 
Therefore let us wrap the mantle of charity over his weak- 
nesses and remember only the good qualities which he 
possessed. He was an obliging neighbor, an indulgent, 
loving father, a good husband, and a generous friend. He 
paid his debts. He respected and obe^^ed the laws of the 
land. A community of such men as William Johns has 
been for thirty 3'ears past would be a poor locality for a 
lawyer. The Sherifi'and Constable would find their voca- 
tion gone. Locks and bolts, window fastenings and watch 
dogs would be a useless expense. Policemen and night 
watchmen could sleep without endangering the lives or 
property of any one. Their services would not be required. 
For man}^ years he was a member of the M. E. Church, 
but for the past twelve yearshe has not been afliliated with 
any charch. He became what the world is pleased to call 
a skeptic. What of it? We are not here to discuss theol- 
ogy or approve or disapprove of any man's religious belief. 
If all men are to be judged by the rule laid down b}' many 
professors of religion, heaven is not yet a very populous 
locality. Though all that walk the earth to-day are but a 
handfull as compared with the innumerable hosts that slum- 
ber in its bosom. 

I have known the deceased from my earliest recollec- 
tions. To me he was always genial, affable and kind, 
always a gentleman, and as such I shall always remember 
him. He lived to a ripe old age. He witnessed many 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. lOl 

solemn and wondertiil changes in this county, and tlie 
whole country. He is gone. His bright eye is dimmed, 
his tongue is silenced, and his hands are cold in that mys- 
tery of m3'steries which we call death. The warm heart 
that throbbed with love for humanity has ceased its vibra- 
tions. Should not such scenes as this humble human 
pride? Should it not arouse our souls to a keener sense of 
responsibility and our duty to the Creator? Soon, very 
soon, we too shall follow him. His life work is ended. 
Whether for weal or woe is not for frail, erring mortals 
like us to judge. We leave his immortal soul to the God 
•ot the universe, to Him who notes the sparrow's fall and 
tempers the wind to the shorn lamb, believing it to be 
impossible for Him to err, and commit his body back to 
JNIother Earth from whence it sprang. Whatever may be 
our individual beliefs, such scenes as this must of necessity 
impress us of the uncertainty of the tenure of life and the 
certaint}' of death. The poet sings in a rhapsody of words, 
^' It is not all of life to live nor all death to die." This we 
believe is true, and our own judgment and conscience teach 
us that it is safest and best to live well. It is more pleas- 
ant to live from day to day with the smiling approval of our 
own conscience than to be constantly haunted by misgiv- 
ings and remorse. Let us all strive to live within the 
■compass of the golden rule, doing from day to others as we 
would have others do unto us. Let us so live that when 
our summons comes to join the innumerable caravan that 
moves to the pale realms of shade, where each shall take 
his chamber in the silent halls of death. We go not like 
the quarry slave scourged to his dungeon, but, sustained 
and soothed by an unfaltering trust, approach our grave 
like one who wraps the drapery of his couch about him and 
lies down to pleasant dreams. 

JAMES HUDSON 
Was born in Trimble county, Ohio, March 29, rSii ; 
was married to Eloner Colgon July 3, 1833, i^ Henry 




MRS. MARY E. WESTERFIELD, Anderson, Ind. 



^ ^»0sh 




lOHN W. WESTERFIELD, M. D., Anderson, Ind. 



I04 THE PIONEERS OF 

county, Ind. She was born in Kentucky, April 23, 1813. 
James Hudson died January 20, 1883 ; buried at Mt. Pisgah 
cemetery. The family came to Monroe township, Madison 
county, in 1835, and were among the first settlers, and the 
first to organize a Christian church in their new home. 
Mrs. Hudson at this writing is eighty-two years old, and 
makes her home with her son, Thomas, near Mt. Pisgah 
Baptist church, five miles north-east of Alexandria, near 
where she has lived so long. 

The following are the names of James and Eloner Hud- 
son's children: John, born May 5, 1834; deceased, and 
buried at the Cassell cemetery. Thomas J., born October 
15, 1857 ; married to Elizabeth Vinson, daughter of Elisha 
Vinson. She was born in Wayne county, Ind., May 3, 
1838 ; married July 30, 1863. His children's names are as 
follows : Eliza E., born April 30, 1864 ; died May 5, 1884 ; 
buried at Mt. Pisgah cemeter}-. Sylvester, born May 8, 
1865 ; died October 31, 1865. Chester W., born Novem- 
ber 24, 1866; died November 24, 1872. Arthur, born 
December 29, 1873 ; at home. The fourth child of James 
and Eloner Hudson was Christopher C, born June 9, 1840 ; 
deceased. Wilson, born May 2, 1842 ; resides in Iowa. 
Mary A., born March 8, 1844; died August 15, 1883; 
buried at Vinson cemetery. Sarah U., born May 18, 1846 ; 
died January 2, 1877 ; buried at Mt. Pisgah cemetery. 
Joseph P., born June 26, 1850; died July 2, 1851. 

Thomas J. Hudson, who gave the above, resides near 
the Mt. Pisgah Baptist church. He and his wife are mem- 
bers of the Christian church, and are held in high esteem 
by all their friends. The family stands high, and is well 
known throughout the county. He is a Democrat of the 
olden time. Mrs. Eloner Hudson died. May, 1895, aged 
eighty-two years. 

LEMUEL K. JONES, 

Son of Henry Jones, was born in North Carolina, Sep- 
tember 20, 1826; married to Sarah Kenyon, Januar}" 6, 



MADISON' AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 1 05 

1S53. She was also born in North Carolina, Ma}', 1833. 
Came to Madison county, Ind., in 1847 ; commenced life 
poor in the woods in Vanburen township, two miles west 
of Summitville, where the family now reside. By hard 
work and economy Mr. and Mrs. Jones have succeeded 
beyond expectation, and have a fine farm and splendid 
house in which to end their da3S in peace and quiet. The}^ 
belong to the Baptist Church, and their home is always 
open to the ever welcome minister. Mr. J. is an old-time 
Democrat, and honest all through life. The tbllowing are 
the names of the children born to them : Sarah H., born 
December 13, 1853; died December, i860: buried at the 
A'inson cemetery. Ellen, born in 1855 ; died November, 
1S58. Rhoda T., born in 1857 ; died September, i860. 
All buried at the Vinson cemetery. Joel A., born October 
22, 1869. Minta E., born Januar}-, 1875. Eftie E., born 
September 10, 1877. 

I first met Mr. Jones in 1874, ^'^'^^en canvassing for my 
first book, History of Madison County, He bought one, 
and I have known him since. I am glad to remember the 
family in the Pioneer. 

JOHN McAllister. 

Mr. McAllister was born in the State of Virginia in 
the 3'ear 1819; came with his parents, William and Belena 
(Frazier) McAllister, in 1830, at the age of about ten years, 
and was raised on a farm, which was his delight. He was 
a splendid man, honest and strict in business matters as 
you will find one in ten thousand. His wife's name before 
marriage, in 1842, was Miss L. Galbreth. She was born 
in Tennessee in 1821, and was a grand, good woman. She 
was widely known and unusually liked by all who knew 
her. The family went to Nebraska in 1884, where they 
died, Mrs. M., July 4, 1888, and Mr. M., August, 1892. 
Both are buried there. 

Mr. and Mrs. McAllister had a host of friends in Mad- 
ison county, where they lived so long and were known so 



I06 THE PIONEERS OF 

well, and where Mr. M. served his fellow-citizens in many 
responsible places, serving as County Commissioner for 
several years. He was all through life a Mason and prac- 
ticed its teachings. He was liberal in his views, and was 
a Universalist in fath. No man ever lived in Madison 
county whose word was better than his, and a true friend 
to all. I am glad to notice this worth}^ couple in the 
Pioneer, who are sleeping in the far awa}' West. 

Following are the names of their children : Koreen, 
born September lo, 1843 ; married to Wilson Cory in 1862 ; 
died in 1886; buried at the Anderson cemetery. Emily, 
born January 18, 1845 ; married to James C. Poindexter in 
1864. He died January 25, 1878; was born in Virginia, 
April II, 1836; was in the late war. Company K, Eighth 
Indiana volunteers, serving as Sergeant, Lieutenant and 
Captain ; children's names, Cora, Charles, Nettie and 
Maud. Carshena, born March, 1847 ; married to Jane 
Booram ; reside in Markleville. She is a daughter of the 
late John Booram. Balema, born in 1849; myn'ied to 
Cassady Manning ; he is deceased. Decatur, born in 1851 ; 
died in 1872; is buried at Pendleton. Mary E., born in 
1853 ; married to Wilson Cory ; reside in Adams township. 
John J., born in 1858 ; married to Miss Roth. She is dead. 
Walter, born in 1865 ; died at the age of two years ; buried 
at the McAllister cemetery. John McAllister was a brother 
of Garrett, James and lliomas, the first two dead. The 
latter lives in Harris, Mo. 

WILLIAM S. GALE, SR. 

This old pioneer of Adams township, who came to the 
Fall Creek settlement in 1833, was born in Pasapatak 
county, N. C, October 14, 1798, and died in the same 
locality January 2, 1881 ; is buried at Mechanicsburg, Ind,, 
two miles east of where he lived sixty years. Mr. Gale 
was married in 1820 in Richmond, Ind., to Panina Small, 
who was born there in 1792. She died about the year 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. IO7 

1873, and is also buried at Mechanicsburg. When Mr. 
and Mrs. Gale came to Madison county the country was 
new, and they had a real struggle to make a start. They 
succeeded, however, and plenty came to their door many 
3'ears before the death of either, for the'}' lived together 
fifty-three years. The following are the names of their 
children: John, born in 1821 ; lived to be three years old. 
Mar\^, born in 1823 ; married to Larkin Judd ; she died in 
1856: buried at the Mechanicsburg cemetery. Elizabeth, 
born in 1825 : married to Samuel Mogal. She died in 
1892 ; buried at Mechanicsburg. Eliza, born in 1827 ; 
married to Washington Morgan ; married the second time 
to Benjamin Mogal ; reside in Missouri. William S., born 
October 9, 1829 ; marriad to Mary Brown. She died 
March 11, 1892; buried at Wilson cemeter}^ three miles 
south of Anderson. Eight children were born to this fam- 
il}' . Nancy, born in 1832 ; married to Andrew Mogal. 
Sarah, born in 1835 ; married to Benjamin Mogal. She 
died in 1859; Juried at Mechanicsburg cemetery. 

William S. Gale was an old-time Whig, afterwards a 
staunch Republican, and for many years a member of the 
M. E. Church. He was an industrious man, and cleared 
up and made a farm out of the green woods, assisted by 
his devoted wife. Their home was about three miles west 
of Mechanicsburg, in Henry county, and their larm near 
the county line of Madison county. 

I am indebted to William S. Gale, Jr., for the above his- 
tory, who was only three years of age when his parents 
came to the county. He has resided here ever since. He 
is a member of the Baptist Church, and held in high 
esteem wdierever known. I am glad to give this famih^ a 
notice among the early settlers of Madison county. 

JOHN FATTIC. 

Mr. Fattic, though not strictly a citizen of Madison 
county, is so closely allied to it by many circumstances 



I08 THE PIONEERS OF 

that I almost feel like he ought to be. However, as he has 
lived most of his life in sight of the count}', and obtained 
his good wife in it, he is at least a "brother-in-law" to us. 
He was born in Showendon county, Va., October 29, 1830. 
He was married to Malinda Davis August 27, 185 1. She 
was born September 7, 1828. She is the eldest daughter 
of the late John Davis, of Adams township, one of the 
grand old men, whose memory we all revere. He was born 
in North Carolina, April 13, 1800, and came to the county 
of Madison about the year 1826. He was married to Mary 
Jackson in 1825 ; also born in Virginia in 1805. Mrs. John 
Fattic is a sister of Maxey, Henry, Tana, Clarinda, James 
H., William, Laurana, Mary A., John and Betty. Clarinda, 
Laurana and William are deceased. John Davis died in 
1881 ; buried at the McAllister cemetery. Mrs. Davis died 
June 27, 1847 ; buried at the McAllister cemetery. Mr. D. 
was again married to Mar}' Creason. She died February 
II, 1884; also buried at the McAllister cemetery. Both 
members of the Baptist Church. 

The following are the names of the children of John 
Fattic, all born, I think, in Henry county, near Mechan- 
icsburg : Mar}- A., married to C. B. Swain; Henry A., 
married to Jennie Keesling ; William B., married to Sarah 
Keesling ; Dr. John B., married to Florence Victor, of 
Cincinnati, Ohio, an accomplished lady. 

Dr. Fattic is a graduate of the highest medical schools 
of the countr}', and stands high among all medical men 
throughout Eastern Indiana. He located in Anderson in 
1890, soon after graduating, and at once entered into a 
^ood practice. He was appointed in 1894 on the United 
States Pension Board of Examiners at Anderson. 

Mr. John Fattic, whose name heads this sketch, I first 
met in i860, and whose acquaintance I highly prize. He 
is upright, honest, and counts his friends by the hundred. 
He owns a farm near Mechanicsburg, Henry county, where 
he has lived all his married life. 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. IO9 

JOSEPH HANCOCK. 

It is with plsasiire I write of Mr. Joseph Hancock and 
famil}^ who have lived so long in INIadison county, and of 
his ancestry, so long and interesting. He lived many 
3'ears in Richland township, nine miles north-east of An- 
derson, where he owns a tine farm and "sunny home," 
and where his best days were spent in hard work, and 
where his children were born. He is one of our best 
farmers and stock raisers, or was during his more active 
days. For the past seven 3'ears he has lived in Anderson, 
where he owns several pieces of property and parcels of 
land. He and his worthy wife are living alone on Nichol 
avenue. The children are all married and have homes of 
their own. Mr. Hancock was born in Wayne county, 
Ind., on the 5th day of January 183 1, son of John Hancock, 
who was born in Ohio, March 8, 1804. His mother, Eliz- 
abeth Pollard, was born in Kentucky in 1807, and married 
in 1826 in Wayne county, Ind. She died October 30, 
1857, and is buried at the Heagy cemetery. Mr. John 
Hancock died March 13, 1886, and is buried at the Heagy 
cemetery, in Richland township. Mrs. Joseph Hancock, 
formerly Esther A. Fountain, was born in Maryland, June 
13, 1830. Her father's name was George Fountain. Her 
mother's name before marriage was Mary Dodd. They 
came to Madison county in 1830. Mr. Fountain died 
November 3, 1854. She died in 1877. 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Hancock were married August 
7, 1851. Children's names: Sarah A., born Februar}' 7, 
1853 ; married to Judge Alfred Ellison, and reside in the 
city of Anderson. John L., born December 3, 1854 ' ni^r- 
ried to Mary E. Lawler in 1876. Mary E., born May 27, 
1857 ; married to F. M. Jones in 1881. William W., born 
March 10, i860; married to Hulda Bronenburg in 1882. 
Joseph C, born February 22, 1863 ; died December 25, 
1865 ; is buried at the Heagy cemetery. James L., born 
April 14, 1866; married to Jane Bronenburg in 1887. 




MR. AND MRS. ALLEN SIMMONDS. 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. Ill 

Martha R., born September 17, 1868; married to Thomas 
Bronenbiirg in 1885. The following are the names of Mr. 
Joseph Hancock's brothers and sisters: Nancy D., mar- 
ried to Daniel Badgely ; reside in Blackford count}', Ind, 
Ruth, married to Martin D. Pence ; reside in Kansas. 
Pollard S., married to Sarah J. Jones. He died, and is 
buried at the Heag}^ cemetery. George W., married to 
Rebecca Vermillion. Fanny and Rebecca, twins. Fanny 
mairied John Vermillion; both deceased. Rebecca died 
in infancy. The following are the names of Mrs. Esther 
A. Hancock's brothers and sisters: William, Elizabeth, 
Edward, James, Nathan, John and Washington. Eliza- 
beth, Edward, John and Washington are dead. John was 
killed at the siege of Vicksburg in 1864. He was a 
member of Company H., Sixty-ninth Indiana Volunteers, 
and a gallant soldier. 

Followincf will be found a sketch of Mr. Hancock's 
ancestry, written by a lady in her eighty-tourth year: 

Elwood, Ind., April 21, 1891. 
^fr. yosc^h Hancock: 

Sir — I will give you a sketch of our foreparents, be- 
ginning with my grandmother. Her maiden name was 
Mary Bush. She married a man by the name of Wallace. 
Four children was the increase, two boys and two girls. 
Their father was killed by the Indians. She then married 
Hancock, the fruits of which was one son, Joseph Hancock. 
His father was also killed by the Indians. Her third hus- 
band was Lewis Castleman. He died, and grandma died 
a widow at the age of one hundred and six years. My 
father, Joseph Hancock, was born in 1758. He enlisted 
and served seven years in the Revolutionary war. He 
married Catharine Baltimore. She was the mother of 
twelve children. They all lived to be married but three. 
Mother died in 1816 ; father died in 1834. Sister Elizabeth 
married Levi Bain ; Nancy married Benjamin Warren : 
Joseph married Susan Milman ; they both died in 1820 ; 



112 THE PIONEERS OF 

one of their sons, Ephraim M., lived to marry and went 
West ; Mary married Samuel Taylor ; Catherine married 
Abraham Covault ; Sophia married Vergil Gilvir ; Naoma 
married William Martindale : John married Elizabeth Pol- 
lard ; Cynthia married Jonathan Reeder. The result of 
this marriage was eleven children. Ten lived to marry, 
and the offspring is forty-two grandchilden, between 
seventy and eighty great grandchildren, and two off the 
fourth generation. 

Now I will go back to the Wallace children. One, a 
young man, was taken prisoner by the Indians. He ran 
away and got back to his people at Fort Bedford. Two 
weeks from the time he got back he was captured again, 
and it w^as supposed he was burned at the stake. The 
other brother was also a prisoner for some time, but got his 
freedom. Of the girls, Barbara married Henry Simmons. 
I don't know much about their family. Mary married 
Mike Watson. They had two sons and six daughters. 
Rebecca married Jeremiah Allen ; Nancy married John 
Strode ; Mary married Mike Conway ; Barbara married 
Charles Row^e ; Sallie married Mattox ; Ruth married 
Samuel Pollard. You see your father's grandmother is 
your mother's great grandmother, Wallace and Grandma 
Hancock. 

I have run the line on Grandma Hancock and father's 
side, and this is on mother's side. Grandma Baltimore's 
first husband's name was Stotts. They had six children. 
The Indians came upon them and killed her husband and 
took her and her six children prisoners, and drove them off 
to their towns, where her children were scattered, and she 
never knew what became of them. She was finally sold 
to the French, when she and nine others ran away. They 
had to hide during the day and travel at night. There 
were but two ever got through to the fort, grandma and a 
comrade. After this she married Baltimore. The fruits 
of this union were a son and daughter, Catherine Baltimore* 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. II3 

my mother, and Phillip, my uncle. After Grandpa Balti- 
more's death, her third husband was father's half brother, 
one of the Wallace bovs. Grandma Hancock's tirst hus- 
band's son. 

I close at this, and if you want any more light on the 
subject of your kind just let me know, or if you can tell 
who all are 3'our kind let me know. 

Cynthia Reeder. 

AHASUEL RAINS, 

One of the grand old pioneers of Lafayette township, 
Madison county, I do not wish to forget. I first met him 
at his home there in 1874. ^^ ^'^'^^ for years a very prom- 
inent man there and wealthy citizen. He was born . in 
Fayette county, Ind., June 15, 1817, son of Jacob Rains. 
Zail RainSy as he was called, was married to Mary Elliott 
in 1837 ; came to Madison county in 1840. He died Janu- 
ary 16, 1879. Mrs. Rains died September 17, 1869 ; buried 
at the Hartman cemetery, in Richland township. The 
following are the names of their children: Martha J., 
married to Samuel Smith. Jacob F., died November 6, 
1887. He was married to Mary Roadcap. William H., 
died in 1876. He was married Hannah Free. John B., 
married to Elizabeth Foster ; Hiram M., married to Eliza- 
beth Roadcap; Sarilda A., married to Columbus Foster; 
Leonard M., born August 2, 1852 ; married to Sarah E. 
Free, October 25, 1873 ; resides in Anderson. Mrs. L. M. 
Rains was born November 9, 1855. Joseph A. was born 
February 10, 1855 ; died January 15, 1856. 

Mr. Zail Rains was the second time married to Mrs. 
Cynthia A. Clark, August, 1871. He was a member of 
the Newlight Church, and a staunch Democrat. He will 
long be remembered as a grand pioneer of Madison county. 

THOMAS McAllister. 

Judge Thomas McAllister was born in Mason county. 
West Virginia, May 21, 1825. His father, William McAl- 
lister, was born in Kentucky in 1788, but moved to Virginia 

6 



114 



THE PIONEERS OF 



in childhood, where he was reared and married. His wife, 
Bellana Frazier, was a native of Virginia. He held a 
commission in the war of 1812, and held several local 
offices in his county of trust and profit. The family 
removed to Indiana in the fall of 1835, and settled in Mad- 
ison county. There the father died in February, 1864, 
having lived upon the same farm for twenty-nine 3'ears. 
Our subject grew to manhood in Madison county, and 
received a good common school education. He was there 
married, in 1849, to Miss Mary J. Poindexter, a native of 
West Virginia, and daughter of Josephus Poindexter. This 
lady was born Februar}^ 12, 1827, and died May 5, 1882, 
After his marriage, Thomas farmed in Madison county 
until 1856, and then removed to Sullivan county. Mo., 
buying a place slightly improved, upon which he still 
resides. He now owns 350 acres of land, 300 in the home 
place, all fenced and improved, and also fifty acres of timber 
land in another tract. He lives in a good, new house, and 
is one of the successful and prosperous farmer citizens of 
the county. In July, 1861, he enlisted in the Twenty-third 
Missouri Volunteer Infantr}-, and served his country until 
discharged at Atlanta, Ga., September, 1864. He enlisted 
as a private, but, before his discharge, had been promoted 
to Orderly Sergeant. At the battle of Pittsburg Landing- 
he was taken prisoner, and held about six and half months, 
six weeks being spent at Montgomery, Ala., and the rest 
of the time at Macon, Ga. He was paroled from there 
and taken to the hospital at Portsmouth Grove, R. I., 
where he remained until the spring of 1863. The same 
year he joined his regiment at Gasconade, Mo., and served 
in Missouri, chasing " bushwhackers," &c., until the spring 
of 1864, when he joined Sherman on his march to the sea. 
July 17, 1864, he was wounded in the right shoulder, and 
taken to the hospital, where he remained until September, 
when he went to Atlanta. After being mustered out at 
^hat place he returned home. 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. II5 

Previous to the war the Judge was a Democrat, but 
since that time he has been identitied with the Republican 
party. His lirst pubhc office was that of Township Collec- 
tor, which he tilled two terms. The office of Justice of the 
Peace he has also tilled two terms. In the fall of 1878 he 
was nominated and elected County Judge, the duties of 
which office he faithfully discharged one term. In March, 
1885, he was married to Margaret Mairs, a native of Vir- 
ginia, and daughter of Dr. Joseph Mairs, formerly of 
Virginia. He is now holding his second term of Township 
Trustee in a Democratic township. 

The Judge has reared a family of six children. Jose- 
phus, married, now living with his family in Milan, county 
seat of Sullivan, being elected Recorder of Deeds in the 
fall ot 1894. William, who died in 1883, aged twenty-six 
3'ears, leaving a family. Thomas O., married, and living 
in Ida county, Idaho. Madbum, wife of S. S. Millege : 
Lois, wife of J. L. Taylor, of Hermann, Oregon ; Sidnev, 
wife of W. TVI. Reger, living in Sullivan county. Judge 
and wife are members of the M. E. Church. The Judge 
is a member of the Masonic order. 

JOHN M. ZEDAKER. 

This old, sturdy pioneer of Madison county w^as born 
near Dayton, Ohio, in the year 1808, son of John Zedaker. 
His mother's name before marriage was Catharine Noland, 
born near Sidney, Ohio, in 1812. Married in Ohio in 1834 '■> 
came to Madison county in 1841, and settled in Vanburen 
township, west of Summitville, in the woods, with few 
neighbors in that early day. Mr. Zedaker had a hard 
time as well as other early settlers. The ground was 
covered with a dense frrowth of timber, and covered 
with water, but they had come to stay, and, with sleeves 
rolled up, a fight in earnest began. Mr. Zedaker died in 
1875, '^^^ ^s buried at Mt. Pisgali cemetery, with other 
members of the family. 



Il6 THE PIONEERS OF 

The following are the names of Mr. and Mrs. John M. 
Zedaker's children : Martha, John W., William and Dan- 
iel M. Daniel M. was born June 17, 1842; married first 
to Elizabeth Payne. She died September 17, 187 1, and is 
buried in Delaware county, Ind. They were married Jan- 
uary, 1867. He was the second time married to Nancy A. 
Morris on November 30, 1876. She was born September 
30, 1852. Names of D. M. Zedaker's children: Clara 
Belle, born November i, 1881 ; Ora A., born August 16, 
1885. The parents of Mrs, Mary A. Zedaker were born 
in Ohio in 1822. There was born to Mr. and Mrs. Eliza- 
beth Zedaker one son, James A., December 22, 1867. 
Mary J., daughter of John M. Zedaker, married to Charles 
Crouse. Sarah E., married to Dr. W. T. Estus ; reside in 
Muncie, Ind. Druzella died April, 1872 ; is buried at the 
Robe cemetery. James N. resides in Marion. Phillip A., 
married to Amanda Hazlebaker ; reside in Summitville. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Zedaker were members of the 
Christian Church, and will long be remembered as worthy 
pioneers of Madison county, where they lived so long. 
Mr. Z. was County Commissioner from 1852 to 1856. 

ESTA M. MAKEPIECE. 

I wish to remember Mr. Makepiece in the Pioneer, for 
he was born in Anderson, June 30, 1846, on the present 
residence of Major Doxey, then owned by Esta's father, 
Alfred Makepiece, one of the pioneers of Madison county, 
and who will be so remembered by many who read this 
sketch. The Makepiece family came to Chesterheld in 
1820, and has been quite prominent ever since. The 
grandfather, Amasa, a very worthy man, came from Mas- 
sachusetts, His sons are as follows, now all dead, I think : 
Allen, Alfred, George, Ransom, Bradley, Hayden and 
Amasa. Girls are Elizabeth, Julia, Laura and Harriet. 
Thomas Makepice, the father of Amasa, senior, was born 
in England, and settled in Massachusetts in 1666. x\masa. 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. II7 

senior, was born in Massachusetts, November 29, 1777, 
and on May i8, 1800, was married to Elizabeth Babbett. 
He died Febriuuy 18, 1848. She died June 18, 1858 ; both 
buried at Chestertield, Ind., where most of the children are 
buried, as well as grandchildren. Alfred Makepiece, father 
of Esta, was a useful man, active, and owned and con- 
trolled a popular hotel and mill at Anderson. 

The subject of this sketch has been somewhat of a 
rover, but at last it seems he has settled in Augusta, Kan- 
sas, where his fellow-citizens elected him to the office of 
County Clerk of Butler county, November 6, 1894. He 
resided in his native county, Madison, State of Indiana, 
till manhood. In 1862 he enlisted in Company H, Nine- 
teenth Indiana Regiment, and served a term of vears, 
being only fifteen years old at first going out. He after- 
wards enlisted in the One Hundred and Thirtieth Indiana 
Volunteers, and served two years. On returning home he 
engaged in the milling business at divers times and places. 
He learned the printer's trade, and at one time could set 
tvpe with any of them. Mr. Makepiece was in some 
twenty-five battles during the war, and was discharged a 
short time before the war closed on account of disabilit}-. 
He was married to Sophia Goodwin, of Yorktown, Ind., 
in 1875. They have two children. Myrtle, born in 1876, 
a graduate of Augusta schools. Charles, born in 1887, in 
Kansas. 

Mr. Makepiece moved to Augusta, Kansas, in 1876, 
and has served in several public capacities. Marshal, Justice 
of the Peace and Clerk. Glad he has succeeded so well 
in his new home. He is a brother of Allen, Horace B., 
Alvin I., Samuel D., Mrs. William Bennett, Charles, Laura, 
Delila and Lutitia. 

NOAH WAYMIRE. 

I am glad to notice Mr. Waymire, one of the early 
settlers of Madison county, and to this end I wa-ote to his 




TIMOTHY METCALF, Summitville, Ind., 
County Commissioner, Elected November 6, 1S94, 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. II9 

son in Kansas and received a history of the family, as there 
was none left in Madison county to give the desired infor- 
mation. Mr. Waymire and family were among the tirst 
tamilies in the county, and occupied a warm place in the 
hearts of many of the older residents, and consequently in 
writing up the Pioneer I could not afford to forget this 
interesting family, now in the West, that is, those who are 
alive. I recollect Mr. Waymire quite well. The first time 
I ever saw him was at an old settlers' meeeting in Madison 
county, at which time he said " when he and his wife came 
to Madison count}' they were poor, and he concluded to 
raise children," and how well he succeeded you may judge 
from the splendid letter from Judge Waymire. This letter 
I know will be read with interest by many people of Madi- 
ison county and elsewhere. Mr. W. was a large man, 
light complexion, and hair inclined to redness, a man well 
fitted for a pioneer life. 

The following is Judge Waymire's letter: 

Mound City, Kan., Dec. 27, 1894. 
To S. Harden, Anderson, Ind.: 

Dear Sir — Sometime sirce I received a circular letter 
from you, by my son at Pleasanton, Kansas, directed to 
Joseph, or any of the Waymire family, asking for a sketch 
of Noah Waymire. As I am the oldest of the children of 
Noah Waj^mire, the circular letter was mailed to me. 

Noah Waymire, deceased, was born January 23, 1810, 
in Montgomery county, Ohio, eight miles north of Dayton. 
In the spring of 181 1 his father, with family, moved and 
settled in the eastern part of the Territory of Indiana, in 
Wayne county, where he grew up to manhood. He was 
married to Mary Howard, who was born in Wayne county, 
Ind., January i, 1815, she being a daughter of John How- 
ard, of said county. After their marriage they lived in 
Wayne county for about one year, and then moved to 
Fountain county, Ind., where they lived for five years. 



I20 THE PIONEERS OF 

They then moved to Madison county in the spring (April 
3d) of 1836, where he began making a home for himself 
and family by clearing off a farm in that wilderness coun- 
try, where he lived and raised a family of fourteen children, 
all living to be men and women, and marrying and having 
families of their own. Eleven of their children are still 
living. Five of his sons served their country in the late 
war. The names of his children are as follows : Jacob, 
John, James, Martin, Sarah Ann, David, Joseph, Rachel, 
Washington, Hiram, Margaret E., Martha, Emily Jane and 
Winfield Scott Waymire. James, Martin and Rachel are 
dead. 

In 1 88 1 Noah Waymire moved with the remnant of 
his family, consisting of his aged wife and two daughters, 
Margaret and Emily Jane, and located in the city of Pleas- 
anton, in Linn count}', Kansas, having sold his farm in 
Madison county, Ind., where he had resided for about 
forty-five years. Noah Waymire had been a member ot 
the M. E. Church for about forty-fix'e years at the time of 
his death. He died September 4, 1884, '^^ ^^^^ home in the 
city of Pleasanton, aged sevent3^-four 3'ears, seven months 
and twelve days. His wafe, Mary Waymire, had been a 
member of the M. E. Church for about forty-nine years at 
the time of her death, which occurred August 8, 1888, aged 
seventy-three years, seven months and eight da3'S. 

The foregoing sketch is taken principally from record, 
especially the dates, and I think I have given you about all 
that is necessary to be given, all at least that you asked. I 
might perhaps have entered a little more into detail of their 
lives and matters connected therewith, but do not care to 
do anything of that kind, hoping the short sketch I have 
given \^ou will be satisfactory' . I remain 3'ours truly, 

Jacob Waymire. 
AARON WILLIAMS, 

Another of Madison count3^'s grand men, was born in 
Union county, Indiana. Januar3^ 5, 1819, son of Anthon3^ 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 121 

Williams and Eloner Fordice. Aaron was married to 
Matilda Bowers October 19, 1843. She was born Febru- 
ary 8, 182 1, in Darke count}-, Ohio. They were married 
at New Castle, Ind. Mr. W. learned the tanning business, 
which he worked at most of his life at Middletown, Ind. ; 
also at Chesterfield, Alexandria, and last at Summitville. 
He came about the year 1844, and to Vanburen township 
in 1S46, where he died March 20, 1887. About the year 
1879 he commenced the mercantile business, which he fol- 
lowed up to the time of his death. On his first arrival at 
Summitville he started a tanyard, which he operated for 
years. He was elected and served as Justice for several 
A'ears. Mrs. Williams died January- 24, 1892. Children's 
names: Henry, born August 2, 1844; died June 20, 1850. 
Josephine E., born April 5, 1846 ; married Stephen Finna- 
more ; reside in Texas. Leander S., born January 20, 
1848 ; married Hannah J. Johnson ; reside in Summitville. 
Mary J., born September 24, 1849 ; married C. C. Adams ; 
reside in Summitville. Harriet E., born September 4, 
1852 ; died December 16, '1863. John M., born November 
24, 1853 ; married Josie D. Vinson ; reside in Alexandria. 
Lucinda C, born November 15, 1855 ; married Joseph B. 
Thawly ; reside in Summitville. Zerilda M., born June 
20, 1858 ; married John C. Allen ; died July 24, 1884. Lau- 
retta died at the age of fourteen years. 

Mr. Williams was an honest man, and as such I am 
glad to record him as one of the pioneers of Madison 
county. The family will so be remembered. The deceased 
are buried at the Vinson cemetery, one and a half miles 
south-west of Summitville. Mr. W. w^as an old-time Whig, 
and after 1856 a strong Republican. 

AQUILLA MOORE. 

I would not forget Mr. Moore among the pioneers of 
Madison county, for he is one from away back, coming with 
his father, Geo. Moore, as early as 1836, and to-day is one 



122 THE PIONEERS OF 

of the very few men who came here that early. He has 
lived constantly in Vanbiiren township since 1836. He 
was one of the first merchants of Summitville, and long its 
postmaster. He was the first man in Vanburen to vote the 
Free Soil ticket in 1848, for James G. Bm-ny. Mr. Moore 
was born in North Carolina, May 26, 1819. He was mar- 
ried to Amanda H. Robb, who w^as born in Kentucky, 
August, 1821. They were married in Vanburen township, 
June 27, 1839. Mrs. Moore's father's name was Robert 
Robb ; mother's name before marriage was Elizabeth Hil- 
lis. Mr. Moore's mother's name before marriage was 
Sarah Burk. All are buried at the Music cemetery, near 
the north line of Madison county. 

The following are the names of Aquilla Moore's chil- 
dren : Columbas W., born October 9, 1840; died in 1870. 
May D., born December 7, 1842 ; married to Druzilla 
Zedaker. George W., born March 13, 1845 ; married to 
Louiza McMahan ; reside in Summitville. Mary A., born 
August, 1848; died August, 186^. Elizabeth H., born in 
1850; died in i860. James B., born November 16, 1858: 
married to Jane Parker. 

I am glad to notice this worthy pioneer family, which 
was among the first to come to this part of the county. 
Mr. and Mrs. Moore stand deservedly high among all the 
people of Vanburen township. They have lived to see 
Summitville grow to the fourth town in the county, and 
Vanburen from the green woods to one of the best town- 
ships in our now grand Madison count}^ 

ISAAC U. COX 

Came early to Madison count}^, and from first to last 
was identified with its best interests. He was born in 
Decatur county, Ind., December 20, 1821, son of Isaac Cox 
and Wellty Austin, that being her name before marriage. 
Isaac M. Cox was married to Mary C. Smith, August 7, 
1845, in Madison county, daughter of Joseph Smith, who 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 1 23 

was an early settler near Pendleton, Ind. She was born 
January 12, 1829, in Decatur county, Ind., and was quite 
voung when she came to Madison county. She resides at 
Summitville, is a well preserved woman and well informed. 
iNIr, Cox died, July 15, 1881, and is buried at Mt. Pisgah 
cemeter}', near where the family lived, in Vanburen town- 
ship, since 1850. He was elected and served several years 
as Count}' Commissioner, to the entire satisfaction of all. 
He was a devoted Mason and loved its noble teachings, 
and practiced the same. He was a strong Democrat. The 
township was new when he settled there, and out of the 
green woods he made a fine farm by hard labor and indus- 
try. He died a little past the noon of life, respected by all. 

The following are the names of Mr. and Mrs. Cox's 
children: James M., born January 12, 1847; resides in 
Frankton, Ind. Sarah F., born April 17, 1851 ; married 
to L. B. Bear; reside in Summitville. Rebecca J., born 
September 29, 1854 5 married to Nathan Call ; also reside 
in Summitville. Mr. C. has served as Treasurer of Madi- 
son county. William A., born November 25, 1858 ; married 
to Amanda Lee; reside in Alexandria. Joseph P., born 
February 6, 1862; died January 17, 1878; buried at Mt. 
Pisgah cemetery. George A., born July 9, 1865 ; married 
to Annie Huston ; second time to Mary Cramer ; seside in 
Hoopstown, 111. Mr. Isaac M. Cox was reared a Quaker. 
SAMUEL F. WILLIAMS, 

One of the grand men of Madison county, was born 
in the State of New York, July 10, 1808, son of Henry 
Williams. His mother's name was Electa Waterberr}-. 
He w'as married to Miss Price, who was born in Virginia, 
November 28, 1814. Her father's name was Abijah Price. 
Her mother's name before marriage was Rachel Gilbreth. 
Mr. S. F. Williams was married in Wayne count}', Ind., 
March 10, 1840 ; came to Madison county in 1833 or 1834, 
first settling at Huntsville, and then at the Falls at Pendle- 
ton, where he worked at Irish & Co.'s flouring mill for 



124 "^"^ PIONEERS OF 

.sometime. In 185 1 the family moved to New Columbus, 
five miles east of Pendleton, where Mr. W. died, Novem- 
ber 18, 1864. During his stay at New Columbus he studied 
law, and was admitted to the bar at Anderson. He was 
Justice of the Peace for several years in Adams township, 
and was appointed by Governor Morton Notary Public. 
He was a well informed man, a staunch Republican, and 
loved the Union and the boys who went to defend it in 
1861. 

The following are the names of Mr. Williams' chil- 
dren : Franklin, born August 30, 1842 ; killed in the army 
at Rolla, Mo., and is buried there. Henry, born October 
16, 1843 ; died in infancy ; is buried at Huntsville, Ind. 
Henrietta, born September 20, 1846; died in 1852 ; buried 
at Columbus, Ind. Emmon, born June i, 1848; married 
to Mary L. Myers. She was born in Pennsylvania, June 
27, 1837 ; married in Pennsylvania, June 20, 187 1. Names 
of children: Hannah A., born in Pennsylvania, January 
10, 1873 ; died October 31, 1894 ; is buried at New Coknn- 
bus. Martha, born November 16, 1875 ; died in infancy. 
Mary C, born in Pennsylvania, June 25, 1877. George, 
son of S. F. Williams, was born January 25, 1850; died 
December 18, 1853. Mark, born June 2, 1852, died June 
18, 1873. Edwin, born March 30, 1853 ; died in infancy. 
Mary E., born January 7, 1855 ; died September 23, 1863. 

Mrs. Samuel F. Williams resides in Anderson, return- 
ing to Madison county some few 3'ears since, after an 
absence of several years in Missouri. She is a well pre- 
served lady of eighty-two years, and well informed about 
the early history of Madison county, where she lived her 
best days, and where she desires to sleep at last beside her 
husband at New Columbus, their home for years, where 
they were highly respected 3^ears gone by. Mr. and Mrs. 
W. have been members of the Christian Church. 
ABRAHAM COTTRELL 

Was another of the grand old men that found his way to 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. I 25 

the new counly of Madison in the year 1823, and settled 
on botii Fall and Lick creek, near the junction, and opened 
and operated a farm up to his death, April 29, 1889. He 
was born in Virginia, June 11, 1803. Married to Susan 
Hilderbrand, October 12, 1823, in Union county, Ind. She 
was born in Virginia, June 29, 1803. I am glad to write 
of this grand old pioneer and his tamily. He was indeed 
a grand man, a tipical pioneer, strong, hardy and honest. 
With sleeves rolled up he went to work to make a farm 
between the two creeks. He erected a cabin, whetted his 
ax, and soon the maul sounded up and down these streams,, 
until the light of the sun was let in. Soon a better house 
was built, and neighbors came, and plenty soon followed,, 
as a reward for frugality and hosesty. Mrs. Cottrell died 
November 22, 1862, and is buried at the Chapman ceme- 
ter}^ near the old home. He was an old-time Whig and 
then a Republican. No man ever lived in Madison county 
that loved his country better than Mr. Cottrell. He was a 
great reader, and well posted in the affairs of the Govern- 
ment. 

The following are the names of Mr. Cottrell's children : 
Mary A., born May 14, 1824 ; married to Abram Gardner ; 
he died March, 1894 ; buried at the Hiday cemetery. Eliz- 
abeth, born July 13, 1826 ; married to Jesse Pilkenton : he 
died in 1890 ; buried at the Fort cemetery. John H., born 
October 10, 1829; resides near the county line, in Green 
township. He was first married to Jane Pettigrew. She 
died in 1880, and is buried at the Beech Grove cemetery. 
He was the second time married to Margaret Anderson, 
September 19, 1880. She was born near Pendleton, Julv 
1 7' 1837. (Mr. Cottrell was in the Twelfth Indiana Volun- 
teers, and served three years. He is a member of the I. O. 
O. F. lodge and G. A. R., and a staunch Republican.) 
Hester, born July 12, 1832 ; married first to John Gardner. 
He died in the army in 1861. She was again married to 
James Clark. William, born January 29, 1834; rnarried 




JUDGE HERVEY CRAVEN, Pendleton, Ind., (DecVl.) 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 1 27 

to Margaret Williams. Both deceased, and buried at the 
Chapman cemetery. Lydia, born May 11, 1836; married 
Carlos Savage ; reside in Pendleton. Abram, born March 
17, 1839; ^^^^ ^^ infancy, August 10, 1840. Samuel P., 
born November 24, 1840 ; died in the arm}-, March 7, 1862, 
at Fort Donalson. He was in the Eleventh Indiana Vol- 
unteers. Thomas J., born September 22, 1843; married 
Marry Scott. He died June 15, 1883, and is buried at the 
Chapman cemetery-. His wife died in Missouri. 

DR. WARD COOK. 

It gives me great pleasure to write of this grand old 
man and doctor, one who has been with us so long in our 
infancy. The pioneer life of Madison county would not be 
complete without a sketch of his life and work during a 
period of fifty years. As a citizen he tilled his place 
well. He was in his make up of a retired nature, but his 
counsel was alvva^-s in demand. A Democrat of the old 
school, never failing in the belief that pure Democracy 
was good for the people. He was for ^^ears a member of 
the M. E. Church, and, as in other walks of life, he was 
counselled and advised with when matters of importance 
came up. As a physician I will hardly be able to tell of 
his great work during his long residence in Madison county. 
He has traveled day and night over the little roads here in 
an early day, when there w^as no way to go but on horse- 
back. His practice extended over a portion of Madison, 
Hancock and Hamilton counties, Pendleton, of course, 
being the center. No man or doctor has ever lived in the 
county who has left such a record as Dr. Ward Cook. His 
going in and out before the people here has only taught us 
to love him in life and lament him in death. 

Following will be found a sketch of his life, taken from 
a medical journal, published after his death, which gives 
more at length his life and character. His last appearance 
in public was at the old settlers' meeting, held in August, 



128 THE PIONEERS OF 

1894, and in that vast assemblage no one was more gladly 
listened to than he. With a falling voice he held the peo- 
ple still-bound for thirty minutes, alter which he had read 
by a friend a paper, the closing paragraph of which will be 
found in the piece taken from the medical journal, referred 
to above, and the closing what I wish to say about him. 

I am indebted to his son. Dr. John W. Cook, of Pendle- 
ton, for the piece referred to above, a son devoted to his 
father seldom if ever equalled : 

DEATH OF DR. WARD COOK, OF PENDLETON. 

Dr. Ward Cook was born in Monroe county. West 
Virginia, October 9, 1808, and died of pneumonia at his 
home in Pendleton, Ind., December 24, 1894, aged eighty- 
six years. He was the sixth of six living children of the 
Rev. Jacob and Isabella Cook, his father being a Methodist 
minister, ordained by Bishop Asburj-, May 20, 1793. After 
attending the country school of his native State until 
seventeen years of age, he spent two years at Maxwell 
Academ}', East Tennessee, an institution under the patron- 
age of the Presbyterian Church, where he said he learned 
hie, haec, hoc and other things. In 1829 he farmed and 
taught school, and in 1830 studied latin and geometr}' with 
his old preceptor, John H. Vawter. In 183 1-2 he studied 
Greek, and in the summer of 1832 gave private literary 
instruction to a class of 3'oung men in Bedford county, 
Virginia, near Liberty, in sight of the far-famed Peaks of 
Otter. In the fall of 1832 he came to Indiana on horse- 
back, traveling a distance of about 500 miles in thirteen 
days. The Thirteenth District Medical Society had a 
meeting-that fall at Pendleton, and as he had read medicine 
some in connection with his other studies, he made appli- 
cation, was exaniined, and granted a license, which was 
dated October 20, 1832. In the spring and summer of 
1833 he practiced medicine at Anderson, Madison county^ 
Ind., and in the spring of 1834 took a trip to Virginia and 
back on horseback, practicing during the summer and fall 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. I29 

of that yedv at Pendleton. In the spring of 1835 ^'^^ again 
returned to his native mountains, and continued to practice 
there until the winter of 1838-9, which he spent in Cincin- 
nati attending- the medical department of the Cincinnati 
College, and graduated in the spring of 1839, ^^^^ diploma 
bearing such imperishable names in the annals of medicine 
and surgery as Gross, Drake, Parker, Harrison, McDowell, 
etc., all long since gone to their account. 

Returning to Virginia, he continued to practice at Red 
Sulphur Springs, when in the summer of 1842 he was 
united in marriage with Mary J. Harvey, daughter of James 
Harvey, of Red Sulphur Springs, West Virginia. On the 
night of September 13, 1848, his house caught tire and was 
destroyed, together wnth its contents, he himself sustaining 
such injuries in trying to extinguish the flames as to nearly 
cost him his life. This event determined his course again 
to the West, and arriving at Pendleton, March 24, 1849, he 
formed a partnership with Dr. Madison G. Walker, and 
immediately entered into practice. 

In June, 185 1, he lost his oldest son, James Harvey ; 
April, 1857, his second daughter, Virginia, and in March, 
1868, his oldest daughter, Ellen. In 1866, April 4th, he 
suffered the greatest loss of his life in the death of his 
beloved wite, Mary J. Cook, leaving him the care of four 
little boys, John, William, Oliver and Ossian, the eldest 
thirteen and the youngest two. He never remarried, and 
continued the practice of his profession until a few years 
ago, when on account of the infirmities of age he gave it 
up. He loved the labor of his calling, ministering to the 
sick and afflicted, and at all times working diligently for 
the up-building of his profession and the elevation of the 
medical standard. He had many times been elected pres- 
dent of the Madison County Medical Society, and was a 
member of both State and county organizations at the time 
of his death. His professional life covered a period of 
flfty-seven years. 

7 



130 THE PIONEERS OF 

Dr. Cook had been a member of the Methodist Epis- 
copal Church for almost fifty years, and in a paper which 
he read at a meeting of the old settlers of Madison county 
at Anderson last August are found following closing 

words : 

I trust, through the infinite mercy of God in Christ Jesus, 
I have a well-grounded hope of a blessed immortalit}-, and 
when I think of the many near and dear friends that have 
crossed tlie flood before me and waiting on the better shore to 
welcome me, it detracts very much from the reluctance and 
undesirability of dying. No need of practicing the healing 

art there — 

'' No chilling winds or poisonous breath 

Can reach that healthful shore — 
Sickness and sorrow, pain and death, 

Are felt and feared no more I" 

CURTIS LANGLEY 

Was born February 6, 1806, in Randolph county, N. 
C, son of Jonathan and Ruth Langley, former!}- Ruth 
Hale. The family first came to Madison county in 1828, 
settling on Kilbuck, near the Henry county line. Curtis 
Langley was married to Naoma Gustin, August 22, 1838, 
in Chesterfield, Ind., by the late Armasa Makepiece, daugh- 
ter of John and Jane (Howe) Gustin. She was born 
November 22, 1819. Mr. and Mrs. Curtis Langley's chil- 
dren's names are as follows : John, born October 9, 1839 5 
married to Susan Tabor : the second time to Neal Russell ; 
reside in Barrett, Wisconsin. Hannah J., born September 
I, 1842 ; died in infancy ; buried at Chesterfield. Mary A., 
born February 20, 1845 ; married to Isaac Tappen ; reside 
in Anderson. James C, born Februarj- 20, 1847 ; married 
to Nancy B. Mockamore ; reside in Galesburg, Wisconsin. 
Thomas C, born December 11, 1850; married to Mary E. 
Credge, daughter of the late Samuel Credge. She was 
born in Fayette count}^ Indiana, in 1855. Mr. and Mrs. 
Thomas C. Langley reside three miles south of Anderson. 
They were married May 16, 1879. Sarah J., born March 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. I3I 

28, 1853; married to John Hull; reside six miles south of 
Anderson. Perry R., born August 30, 1855 ; married to 
Florence Coopman ; reside in Franklin, Ind. Bethen}' M., 
born February 26, 1858 ; died at the age of six years ; is 
buried at the Chesterfield cemeter}-. Catharine S., born 
November i, i860; married to John Maddron, December 
21, 1879. ^^^ ^'^ deceased, and buried at the Whetstone 
cemetery, four miles south of Anderson. Curtis A., born 
February 6, 1863 ; died in infancy ; buried at the Whetstone 
cemetery. Mr. Curtis Langley died August 22, 1875, and 
is buried at the Whetstone cemeter}^ Mrs. Langley was 
married to Jonas Whetstone in 1880. He died in 1891, 
and is also buried at the Whetstone cemetery. 

I am glad to give this pioneer family a sketch in this 
work. Mr. Langley was a well posted man, well informed, 
and a minister of more than local note. He w^as formerlv 
a Dunkard, but the last years of his lite belonged to the 
Christian, or Newlight, Church, as well as his wife, who 
survives him, and at this time resides in Anderson. Mr. 
L. was in person about five feet eight inches high, stoutl}^ 
built, with light hair and complexion. He will long be 
remembered as one of Madison county's best as well as 
earliest citizens, and all the time a Jacksonian Democrat. 
JOSEPHUS POINDEXTER 

Was born in Virginia, Febi'uary 19, 1798, son of James 
and Mary Poindexter. He was married to Sidney Connor 
in Virginia, February 7, 1824. She was born in Virginia, 
September 3, 1807. Came to Madison county in 1836, 
settling in Adams township, where all the children were 
born except five. The familv, wiiich is a very large one, 
was among the best that came to Madison county and 
early became identified with its best interest. Mr. P. served 
many years as Justice of the Peace in Adams township, 
where he died. May 30, 1858, and is buried at the Busby 
cemetery, in Fall-Creek township. Mrs. Poindexter died 
near Alexandria, November 5, 1892, and is buried at the 



132 THE PIONEERS OF 

Walker cemetery. Mr. and Mrs. Poindexter were in faith 
Universalists and Jacksonian Democrats. 

The following are the names of their children : Rob- 
ert E,, born in Virginia, September 18, 1825 ; resides in 
Indianapolis; thrice married. Mary J. , born in Virginia, 
February 12, 1827 ; married to Thomas McAllister; reside 
in Missouri. Lewis T., born June 2, 1828 ; died at the age 
of twenty-years ; buried in Virginia. Joseph, born April 
29, 1830 ; married to Mary M. Giles ; reside in Muncie, 111. 
Virginia, born July 31, 1832; married to William Busby. 
She died in Illinois. Margaret, bcrn April 29, 1834 ? "tar- 
ried to John M. Sloan ; reside in Madison county ; born in 
Virginia, as well as all the above. James C, born April 
II, 1836; married to Emily McAllister, daughter of John 
McAllister. James C. died Janary 25, 1878; was married 
April 24, 1864 ; born in Virginia. Harriet, born in Indiana, 
December 28, 1840 ; married to John C. McAllister. He 
died in Illinois. She was the second time married to W. 
W. Hilton. Nancy E., born May 16, 1843 ; died Novem- 
ber 15, 1851. Charles J., born November 27, 1845; died 
in infancy. Eli, born in Indiana, May 4, 1838 ; married to 
Mary E. Boughman. She was born January 8, 1845. 
Their children's names are : Wallace, married to Allie 
Potts ; reside in Madison county ; William and Calvin. 
Eli Poindexter resides in Delaware county, Ind., six miles 
north-east of Alexandria. Thomas B., born November 8, 
1846; married Sidna Elmore. She was born March 11, 
1852 ; married July 17, 1870 ; reside hve miles north-east of 
Alexandria. One child, Odiska, born October 16, 187 1 : 
married to William Wisehart. Edwin, the 3'oungest of 
the Poindexter family, was born November 15, 1851. He 
married Mar}'^ McQiiary. He died in Missouri, Decem- 
ber, 1893. 

The father of Josephus Poindexter was born Novem- 
ber 6, 1765 ; his mother, Mary Thompson, May 21, 1764. 
Married, 1704; died in 1833. 



MADISON AM) HANCOCK COUNTIES. I33 

DANIEL STANLEY 

Was l:>orn in North Carolina in 1799, '^"^^ ^^''^'^ married 
to Elizabeth Perkins, Februar}- 15, 1820, in Ohio. She 
was born in Ohio in 1804. They came to Madison county, 
and settled four miles south-east of Anderson, where all 
the family were born except John and George, who were 
born in Ohio. Daniel Stanley died December 11, 1877. 
Mrs. Stanley died March 14, 1885. Both are buried at the 
Whetstone cemetery-. He was seventy-seven years, eleven 
months and two days old. She was seventy-five years, 
eight months and twenty-six days old. 

The following are the names of their children : John, 
born December 5, 182 1 ; resides in Anderson. George, 
born June 5, 1824 ; died in Missouri. Annie, born Febru- 
ary 23, 1826 ; married George Elsworth : reside at Mulberry 
Grove, 111. Elizabeth, born Ma}^ 4, 1828 ; married first to 
John Harmason ; second time to John Wilson; reside four 
miles south-east of Anderson. Milton, born December 
27, 1830 ; went to Missouri. Rebecca, born December 8, 
1832; married to Caleb Vandevender ; died in Missouri. 
Eli, born December 10, 1833 ; resides in Missouri. Alfred, 
born February i, 1836; married to Sarah Rector.in 1858; 
reside in Anderson. Mary, born March 11, 1838 ; married 
to William Makemore. Nancy, born May 24, 1842 ; mar- 
ried to Moses Brothers; reside in Anderson. Malinda J., 
born February 22, 1845 ; married to James Childs. He is 
deceased. 

The family was quite well known in Madison county, 
and was among the early families to come here. The old 
folks lived to see vast changes in their new home in the 
woods. 

BIRKETT EADS. 

This old pioneer first looked out on this beautiful world 
on the hills of old Virginia, August 23, 1798, and remained 
there till he was married to Eliza Collins, May 27, 1819. 




MOSES D. HARMON, Anderson, Ind. 
Recorder of Madison County, Elected November 6, 1894. 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. I35 

She was born in Virginia, August 6, 1800. Soon after 
this event Mr. and Mrs. Eads bid farewell to the land of 
their birth and came to Kentucky. Here they remained 
for several years, where three or four of the older children 
were born. About the year 1830 they removed to Henry 
county, Ind., and there lived till 1835, when they came to 
Madison county, where they lived till death. Mr. Eads 
died August 11, 1866, and is buried at the Anderson cem- 
etery, near where he settled. Mrs. Eads is also buried 
there. 

Mr. Eads on first coming to Madison county worked 
on the canal between Anderson and Alexandria, in 1836-7. 
He was a strong, uncompromising Dem.ocrat, and took an 
active part all his life. He was elected Sheriff' in 1856 and 
County Recorder in i860, serving in all eight years, to the 
entire satisfaction of all. He will long be remembered as an 
active man in the history of Madison county. He was at 
the time of his death the best known of any man in the 
county, except perhaps William Roach and Nin Berry. 

The following are the names of Mr. and Mrs. Eads' 
children, all dead at this time (1894) except John and Wil- 
liam H. John resides in Anderson and William H. in Mt. 
^E^tna, Ind. The first born was Amanda, March 15, 1820 ; 
married to Samuel Smith. She died April 1 1 , 1847 ; buried 
at the Nelson cemetery, in Richland township. Edward 
C, born November 24, 1821 ; died March 7, 1940; buried 
in Henry county at the Mt. Pleasant cemetery. Oscar, 
born February 3, 1824; married to Ann Johnson. She 
died June 28, 1859; buried at Anderson. Aletha, born 
December 17, 1825 ; married to Reuben Rederthford. She 
died January 13, 1874; buriod at the Nelson ' cemeter}'. 
Lewis, born July 9, 1830, in the State of Kentucky ; mar- 
ried to Elizabeth J. Gitt. She was born June 18, 183 1, 
and died March 9, 1874. ^^^ died January 18, 1880, and 
is buried in Cass county, Ind. ; she at Peru, Ind. John, 
born in Henry county, Ind., February 10, 1833 ; married to 



136 THE PIONEERS OF 

Mary Anderson, November, 1856. She was born August 
22, 1832 ; reside in Anderson. William B., born March 
30, 1828 ; married to Rachel \Vamsle3' ; reside in Hunting- 
ton county, Ind. 

Mrs. Birkett Eads lived several 3'ears after Mr. Eads' 
death. Perhaps she died in 1878. The exact time I failed 
to get. She was a large woman, and was well known by all 
the older people of Anderson. Mr. Eads was for years an 
active Mason, and served in all the chairs of Mt. Moriah 
Lodge, No. 77, Anderson. Both Mr. and Mrs. Eads were 
members of the Christian Church. Three or four children 
died in intancy, and are buried at the Nelson cemetery. 

I am indebted to John Eads for the above history of 

this pioneer famiK'. 

JOHN DAVIS, 

One of the grand old men of Adams township, Madi- 
son county, was born in Pasapatack county, N. C, April 
13, 1800, Married to Mary Jackson (also born in North 
Carolina) in 1825. She was born in 1805. The}^ came to 
Madison county in 1827. Following are their children's 
names : Maxe}^ born in North Carolina in 1828 ; married 
to Loustay Gilmore ; reside in Adams township. Mary 
M., born in Indiana about the year 1829 ; married to John 
Fatic ; reside near Middletown, Ind., father and mother of 
Dr. Fatic, of Anderson. Henry, born about 1832 ; married 
to Susan C. Justice, daughter of Archibald Justice ; reside 
in the State of Washington. Tana, born about 1834; 
single ; resides on the old home, one mile north of Markle- 
ville. Clarinda, born in 1836; died April, 1870; is buried 
at the McAllister cemetery. James, born March 13, 1838 ; 
married to Susan Eppard. She was born June 17, 1847; 
married April 29, 1869 ; reside near Markleville. William, 
born May 25, 1840; married to Eliza Collins (formerly 
Eliza Walker.) William died in Kansas, October 16, 
1894 ; buried at Valley Falls. Lurana, born in 1842 ; mar- 
ried to Solon Walker. She died ; buried at the McAllister 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 1 37 

cemeteiy. Mary A., born in 1846; married to Archibald 
Bray ; reside in Adams township. 

Mrs. Davis died June 27, 1847, and is buried at the 
McAllister cemeter}-. Mr. Davis \\as again married to 
]\L"uy Creason. Two children were born to this marriage. 
Elizabeth, married first to J. R. Cole. He died. The 
second time to Eli Hartzell ; reside in Adams township. 
John, born in Adams township; married first to Emma 
Hardy ; the second time to Alice Guard ; reside one mile 
north of Markleville. Mr. John Davis died in 1881. Mrs. 
Da\-is died February 11, 1884. Both are buried at the 
McAllister cemeter\'. Both were Baptists, and among the 
first people of that localit}-. Long ma}^ their memory live. 

JOSEPH H. RIDER, 

One of the rising young men of Madison count}', who 
lives tour miles south of Anderson, was born in Wayne 
county, Ind., November 2, 1852, son of Dr. D. M. Rider, 
of near Ovid, Ind., where he practiced medicine many 
years. Joseph's mother's name before marriage to Dr. D. 
M. Rider was Miss Howard. She died, April, 1884. 
Joseph was married to Sarah E. Cooper, August 29, 187 1, 
daughter of the late Isaac Cooper, one of the pioneers of 
Adams township, born in Virginia in 1795, and came to 
Madison county in 1830. Her mother's name before mar- 
riage to Isaac Cooper was C3nthia Blake. Isaac Cooper 
was in the war of 181 2. Mrs. Cooper is yet living (1895.) 

The following are the names of the children of Joseph 
H. and Sarah E. Rider: Lineas L., born June 18, 1873 ; 
died September 10, 1874; buried at Mechanicsburg, Ind. 
Gertrude, L., born March 6, 1876. 

Mr. Rider is a Democrat, and served as deputy Sherifi' 
under the late Randall Biddle. He is a progressive farmer 
and pushes his work ; is a free thinker, and not a member 
of any church. 



138 THE PIONEERS OF 

Brothers and sisters of Mrs. Sarah E. Rider : Wil- 
liam, Hannah, Mahala, Hiram, Isaac, George and Retta. 
Retta is deceased, aged twenty-two years. Mrs. Rider 
was born on the farm where the Indians were killed in 
1824. 

DAVID PITTSFORD 

Came with William Pittsford, his father, to Madison 
county in 1827, and settled en what is known as the French 
farm, one mile west of the "Mounds," where the family 
resided many years. William Pittsford went to Missouri, 
and died there in i860. Mrs. William Pittsford died in 
Madison, Ind., in 1870; is buried at Anderson cemetery. 
He.r name before marriage was Betsy Bodle. The family 
came from Licking county, Ohio, to Clark county, Ohio, 
and from there to Madison county, Ind. The following 
are the names of William and Betsy Pittsford's children : 
David, born in Clark county, Ohio, March 24, 1824; 
Nancy, Polly, Isaac, Isabel and Sallie. Polly died in 
1874 ■' Isaac died in 1889. 

David Pittsford, the one whose name heads this sketch, 
was a mere boy when he came to Madison county, and 
lived here till February 7, 1889 ; is buried at the Anderson 
cemeter}^ He was married to Phebe Stanley, July 22, 
1855. She was born in Madison county, September 4, 
1833, daughter of William Stanley. Her mother's name 
before marriage was Sarah Miller. The following are the 
names of their children: William, born May 3, 1856; 
resides in Anderson. Amelia, born December 12, 1857; 
married to John Stanley. She died in Kansas in 1888. 
She was a teacher, and a grand, good woman. She is 
buried at Anderson. Frank, born April 2, 1862 ; married 
to Ollie Bennett. She was born in Delaware county, Ind. ; 
reside on the old farm, two miles south-east of Anderson. 
Three children died in infancy. 

Mrs. David Pittsford was married to Erasmus Fifer, 
November 14, 1893. He was born in Virginia, March 6, 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 1 39 

1818, and they reside on Pitt street, Anderson. He is a 
Christian minister. 

David Pittsford, like all the Pittsford family, was a 
large man, strong, and well fitted for a pioneer life. He 
was among the first to help organize a county fair in Mad- 
ison county. A Republican of the strongest kind, and 
belonged to the Christian Church. He will be remembered 
as one of Madison county's best as well as oldest citizens. 
Glad to give him a notice in the Pioneer. 

HENRY SMITH 

Was born in Maryland in 1819, and married to Isabel 
Pittsford, December 6, 1849. ^^^^ ^^ ^ daughter of the late 
Willian Pittsford. She was born June 28, 1831. The fol- 
lowing are the names of their children : Elizabeth, born 
December 19, 1850; married to Robert Stanley; reside in 
Danverse, 111. James, died in 1887, aged twenty-seven 
years ; buried at Anderson. Barbara, born in 1852 ; mar- 
ried to Jesse Null ; reside in New Paris, Ohio. Nora, born 
in 1854; married to N. M. Connor; reside at Rosewood, 
Ohio. Sylvester, born in 1859 ' married to Elizabeth 
Spaulding ; reside on the home farm. John J., born in 
1862 ; married to Jennie Null ; reside in Anderson ; a tip 
top man, a hard worker, and enjoys life in the fullest. 
Henr}^ born in 1864 ; died at the age of twenty-four years ; 
buried at Chesterfield. 

Mr. Henr}^ Smith died May 3, 1864. Mrs. Smith was 
married to William Vandrender, June 29, 1875. He was a 
son of Phillip Vandrender, one of the pioneers of Madison 
county. William Vandrender was a prominent man and 
Democrat. He died at his home, four miles south of 
Anderson, December 16, 189J, aged sixty-eight years; is 
buried at the Wilson cemetery. His first wife was a daugh- 
ter of Dempsy Wilson. She died, May 26, 1873 ; also 
buried at the Wilson cemetery. Mrs. Isabel Vandrender, 
like all the Pittsfords, is large, and has underwent many 



140 THE PIONEERS OF 

hardships. A sister of David, Isaac, Poll}- Allen, Nancy 
and Sallie. 

PROB^ESSOR JOSEPH SWAIN 

Is a son of Wolson Swain, of near Pendleton, an earl}- 
settler there, who came from Pennsylvania back in the 
forties, and settled in what is known as the Qiiaker Settle- 
ment. Here Joseph was born and raised on a farm. He 
went to the common, schools of that locality up to the age 
of eighteen years, vs^hen, not satisfied with such advantages 
afforded at such schools, he attended college, and gradu- 
ated in the highest honors, and at once became one of our 
best educators in Indiana, and to-day (1895J is president of 
the college at Bloomington, Ind., where he enjoys the 
highest confidence of all as a citizen and educator. He is 
broad in his views. His training and reading has alwa3-s 
tended to make him such. In person he is dignified, full 
six feet tall, and at once is pointed out as a man of mark. 
He is retired in his make up, and at once commands the 
highest respect wherever he goes. Below will be found a 
letter from him, which will be read with great interest 
by all : 

A STUDENT. 

The ideal student is not a snob in any sense of the 
word. He is not dependent upon his good or bad looks, 
on the part of his hair, the style of his eye-glasses, the cut 
of his coat, the size of the head of his cane, or the shape 
of his boot. Neither is he dependent upon the size of his 
muscle, the distance he can jump, his speed in running, the 
•curve of his ball, or his agility and strength in foot-ball. 
He does not take pride in the number of 3'oung ladies who 
have fallen victims to his wiles, nor in the number of par- 
ties and receptions which he attends, and in his general 
popularity. Nor does he become a book-vi'orm, spending 
all his time and energy trying to make excellent grades, 
thereby becoming a mere machine and a drudge. He is 
not quick to point out the faults of his fellow-students, nor 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. I4I 

decry their work in order to exalt his own. He does not 
flaunt in tlie face of others his new rehgious discoveries. 
Nor does he propose to reform the world at a single stroke. 
He is not dyspeptic physically or mentally. He does not 
allow any habit to become his master, or any one to own 
iiis conscience. He is not a flirt, a shirk or a dude. The 
best thing about genuine youth, says Hall, is that it can not 
and will not interest itself in what it feels to be formal, 
trifling, dry, insincere, or of less than the highest worth. 
These, and man}^ more things which might be mentioned, 
he is not, but he is not wholly a negative creature. There 
are many positive points in his character. 

He is neat in dress and easy in manner. He enjovs 
the best society and the best entertainments. He knows 
enough music and art to be able to appreciate the best 
music and the finest pictures. He loves nature and knows 
the best books. He is interested in everything. He has 
the power to master any subject to which he may turn his 
attention, and early selects some one narrow field in which 
he proposes to make himself an authority. 

He is fond of out door sports, but looks upon them 
only as a means of recreation, in order to put himself in 
condition for the more serious duties of life. He is system- 
atic in his work, having regular hours for stud}', pleasure 
and recreation, and allows nothing to interfere with his 
work. He has high ideals of morals, and does everything 
., in his power to make the moral standard of the university 
higher than it has ever been before. • 

He has high standards of work — alwa3's a higher 
standard than he has been able to reach, and becomes 
higher each day and year. He is independent in thought 
and in action, without being dogmatic and self-centered. 
He is a severe critic of himself and charitable toward 
others. He is always seeking favors for others, and pre- 
fers to honor a friend rather than to receive honor. He is 
interested in church affairs and in the study of the Bible. 




H. C. RYAN, 
Attorney. Anderson. Ind. 




HOWELL D. THOMPSON. 
Attorney, Anderson, Ind. 




JUDGE ALFRED ELLISON, 
Anderson, Ind.. Elected in 1892. 





JOHN L. FORKNER, 
Ex-County Auditor. Anderson, Ind. 



GEORGE W. WHELOCK. 
Anderson, Ind. 



MADISON AND HA-NCOCK COUNTIES. 1^3 

In a word, he uses every means at his command to culti- 
vate to its highest capacity every good and precious gift 
with whicli he has been endow^ed. " Every heaUhy, youthful 
soul has a strong and eager curiosity which bad pedagogy 
alone can kill." It circumventates like a vine to find some 
Jacob's ladder up which it can climb. 

Joseph Swain. 
Indiana University, 1895. 

EDWARD VERNON, 

M}' old-time friend, must not be overlooked in the 
Pioneer. He was born in Chester count}-, Pa., November 

16, 1816, (just the age of his adopted State, Indiana), son 
of Abram Vernon and Mary Bailey, born respectively. 
May 30, 1774, and May, 1794. Edward Vernon w^as mar- 
ried to Hannah Rodgers, October 15, 1840, daughter of 
Benjamin Rodgers, one of the pioneers of Madison count}'. 
jNIrs. Ed Vernon was born in Pennsylvania, November 

17, 1822. Mr. Vernon settled about two miles east of 
Pendleton, where he has resided the past fifty years, and 
where he began life almost in the woods, and by hard work 
has made a fine, productive farm, where to-day (1895) he 
enjoys life to perfection in his declining years. On the 
24th of October, 185 1, he lost his wife, a noble woman, 
who came to the front and helped make their home. She 
was a Qiiaker, and held in high esteem by all who knew 
her in life. She is sleeping in the Qiiaker cemetery, near 
her home, where her last days were spent. The following 
are the names of the children born to Mr. and Mrs. Ver- 
non : Elizabeth E., died in infancy. Abner R., born 
December 28, 1843 ; married to Jemima Harris ; reside 
near Menden, Ind. Mar}- E., born December 31, 1847; 
married to Noah Haines ; reside on the pike midway 
between Pendleton and Markleville. Sarah A., married 
to Cassius Jacobs ; reside in Fall-Creek township. She 
was born January 21, 1850. Mr. Vernon was the second 
time married to Ruth A. Davis, daughter of Thomas and 



144 ^^^ PIONEERS OF 

Rachel Davis, born in Henry county, Ind., July 27, 1829; 

married January 18, 1855. To this marriage the following 

are the children's names: Abram, born February 11, 

1856; died in infancy. Hannah E., born November 13, 

1857; died in infanc}'. Thomas D., born May 25, 1859: 

died in infancy. Esther P., born April 8, 1862 ; married 

to Isaac Woolman. Rachel D., born December 19, 1864 ; 

married to Herry Foust. Charles E., born July 21, 1866 : 

married to Nancy Miller. Anna R., born January 20, 

1868; single. Fanny S., born December 4, 1871. Ruth 

A., born March 17, 1877 ; both died in infancy. 

Mr. Vernon's wives and children are buried at the 

Quaker cemeter}^ Mr. V. has always been a friend to 

humanity ; was an old-time Whig, and since 1856 a strong 

Republican. He is a liberal man, both as regards politics 

and religion : a free thinker, enjoys life to the utmost, and 

looks on the bright side of things generally. About forty 

3'ears ago I first met Ed, and will remember him as an 

honest man and true friend. Mr. V.'s second wife died 

March 17, 1877. 

JOHN HALL, 

Son of Joseph Hall and Octaine Hook, was born in 
Ohio, Februar}' 6, 1825, and came with his parents to 
Monroe township, Madison county, in 1841. On May 4, 
1848, he w'as married to Miss Davis, daughter of Baxter 
Davis, one of the early settlers of that locality. She died 
December 11, 1872, near Alexandria. Mr. Hall was the 
second time married to Mattie M. Miller, who was born in 
Perry county, Ohio, October 28, 1845 ; married November 
26, 173. Children's names: Alice, born December i2» 
1874; J. W., born September i, 1876; Mattie, born May 
4, 1878; Joseph IL, born September 20, 1880; Charles 
J., born March 2, 1884 ; died March 7, 1887 ; buried at Mt. 
Pisgah cemetery. Carrie G., born April 21, 1890. 

Joseph Hall, father John Hall, died March 28, 1869. 
Mrs. Joseph Hall died in 1874. Mrs. John Hall's parents 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 1 45 

died in Ohio in 1893 ; buried at the Bethel cemetery, Perry 
county, Ohio. 

John Hall commenced lite on a larm, and was at one 
time one of the largest land holders in the county. He 
engaged in the milling business at Anderson, and built up 
a fine trade at what is known as the Killbuck Mill, and for 
several years operated it, and improved it to one of the 
best mills in the county, and is to-day so considered. 
About the year 1880 he sold out and bought a part of the 
old Pettigrew farm, in Green township, where he now 
resides, one of the first farms in that locality. Mr. Hall is 
a progressive man and farmer ; raises one hundred bushels 
of corn to the acre (in 1894). He is a Republican, and I 
think a free thinker ; does his own reading and votes 
accordingly. His father, Joseph Hall, was one of the 
prominent men of near Alexandria, and the family stands 
high. His brother, Jesse Hall, of Monroe township, is 
one of the best farmers in the county. I am glad to notice 
this family in my work. Perhaps no man in the county is 
better known than John Hall. 

THORNTON RECTOR, 

A grand old pioneer of Madison county, was born in 
North Carolina, December 25, 1804. He was married in 
Wayne count}^ Ind., in 1825, to Nancy Little. She was 
born there April 18, 1810. Soon after marriage they came 
to Adams township, two miles north of New Columbus, on 
Sugar Fork, and there the family resided for many years, 
and made one of the best farms in that locality. Mr. 
Rector entered his land and died on it. He was a very 
strong man, and did as much hard work as any man that 
ever lived in the county. The Rector family will long be 
remembered as one of the first on Sugar Fork. He was a 
Jeftersonian Democrat of the olden time. 

The following are the names of the children of Mr. 
and Mrs. Rector: Elizabeth, born September 10, 1826; 



146 THE PIONEERS OF 

married to Meredith Stanley. She is deceased ; buried at 
the Gilmore cemetery. Jacob, born October 14, 1827 ; 
married to EHzabeth Hoppis. He was in the army ; died 
in 1886. Mary A.,, born June 28, 1829; married to John 
Stinson. Peter, born October 13, 1832 ; married to Mary 
E. Howard ; reside on Fall creek, Adams township. Isaac, 
born March 21, 1835 '■> died at the age of ten j^ears ; buried 
at the Gilmore cemetery. Henry, born June 27, 1837 '■> <^ied 
at the age of thirty-four years ; buried at the Gilmore cem- 
eter}^ ; died in 1874; single. Sarah, born December 25, 
1840 ; married to Allen Stanley in 1858 ; reside in Ander- 
son. Charity, born June 28, 1842 ; married to John Stoler. 
Nancy J., born May 6, 1844; married to John Harmason ; 
near Anderson. Alcy R., born December i, 1846; mar- 
ried to George Poor ; she is dead. Jessie L., born January 
15, 1855 ; single. Mr. Rector died December, 1877. Mrs. 
R. died in 1885. Most of the family are buried at the 
Gilmore cemetery. All the children were born in Madi- 
son county. 

JOHN HARMASON, SR. 

This old veteran came to Madison county in 1836. He 
was married in Belmont county, Ohio, in 1823, to Parlia 
Minor. The four oldest children were born in Ohio. The 
Harmason family settled about two miles south of Anderson, 
where Mr. H. entered eighty acres of his land. Here he 
and his good wife began life, with four small children, in 
the woods, and by strict economy and industry they suc- 
ceeded in making a grand farm, where the rest of the 
children were born. Mr. Harmason died September 5, 
1877. She died June 19, 1869. ^^ ^^'"^^ seventy-four 
3'ears, eleven months and six days old. She was sixty-five 
years, three months and eighteen days old. Both buried 
on the old farm. 

The following are the names of Mr. Harmason's fam- 
ily : David, died in 187 1, at the age of forty-eight years ; 
lived on the home farm. William, born February 15, 1824 ; 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. I47 

married three times ; first to Miss Vandevender, second 
to Mag Merrick, and third to Emily J. Felty ; all dead. 
Clark, married to Emma Caswell ; reside in Colusa, Cal. 
Emily, married to Meredith Stanley. She died ; buried on 
the home farm. Thomas J., married to Maria Whetstone ; 
reside two miles south-west of Anderson. Allen, married 
first to Elizabeth Evans ; second time to Mrs. Sparks, in 
1880, daughter of Hayward Scott ; reside three miles south 
of Anderson. She was born January 4, 1855. Mirror J., 
married to Mary Butler ; resides in Colusa, Cal. She is 
deceased ; buried at the Wilson cemetery, four miles south 
of Anderson. John, born May 4, 1840; married to Nancy 
J. Rector ; reside one and a half miles south of Anderson, 
on part of the old home farm. Mrs. John Harmason, Jr, 
was born May 6, 1842 ; married September 11, 1863. 

John Harmason, Sr., was, a few years after the death 
of his wife, married to Mrs. Benjamin Wilson, who sur- 
vived him. Mr. Harmason was one of the hard working 
men of Madison county, and lived to see it much developed. 
A Democrat of the old school, and a grand old-timer of 
Madison county. Glad to give the family a sketch in the 
Pioneer. 

CONRAD CROSSLY, 

One of the grand old pioneers of Madison county, was 
born in the State of Virginia, Januar}^ i, 1799. He was 
married to Elvira Lain. She was born in 1807. Soon 
after marriage they came to Indiana, and settled near 
Pendleton in 1820, where they made out of the green woods 
one of the finest farms in the county, and where the family 
was born. He died, March 12, 1869. She died, August, 
1891. Both buried on the old farm, three miles south-west 
of Pendleton, No family or house was better known than 
the Crossly. Here the old and first settlers gathered in 
the early twenties. Nothing too good to give or lend a 
neighbor was their motto, and in sickness, their kindness 
was unbounded. Mr. and Mrs. Crossly will live in the 



148 THE PIONEERS OF 

memory of the coming generation as noble hearted pio- 
neers. Some of their children died young, and are buried 
on the old farm. 

The following are the names of their children : Sarah, 
married to James Brown ; both dead ; buried at the Mendon 
cemetery. Virginia, married to James Manifold ; reside 
near Mendon. Corydon W. ; resides in Ingalls. Mar- 
garet, born July 22, 1843 ; married to Daniel Propps, 
December 3, 1866. Warren F., born February, 1846; 
married to Sarah Guy ; reside near the old farm. Lou C, 
married to Samuel Propps. She is deceased ; buried on 
the old farm. Daniel W., born April 4, 1850 ; married to 
Martha P. Parsons ; reside in Pendleton. She was born 
in North Carolina, July 13, 1852 ; married, January 5, 1871. 
One child, William H., born in 1872 ; single. 

I am glad to give this interesting family a notice in the 
Pioneer, as few came as early as they among the advance 
guard of a grand army that came to our county. Mr. C. 
was an old-lime Whig, a free thinker, and did not belong 
to any church or order. He was present and a guard at 
the hanging of the Indian murderers near Pendleton in 
1824. Mrs. C. was for many years a consistent member 
• of the Methodist Church. In person Mr. C. was of light 
complexion, some six feet high, and would weigh perhaps 
two hundred pounds at his best. A pleasant talker, and 
full of early time reminiscences, which he delighted to 
relate. Long may the memory of this family live. Mr. 
James Manifold died October, 1895. 

DAVID CATTRON. 

Mr. Cattron was born in Chester county, in the State 
of Pennsylvania, Februar}^ 10, 1808. He was married to 
Rebecca Vernon, January 12, 1832, in Pennsylvania. She 
was born, July 22, 1808. Moved to Wayne county, Ind., 
in 1837, "^^^ to Madison county in 1839, settling about four 
miles east of Pendleton, where their home was till broken 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 



149 



up by the death of Mr. Cattron, November 10, 1895. He 
is buried at the Qiiaker cemetery, two miles west of where 
he resided so long. Mr. Cattron was a grand, good man, 
and loved and respected wherever known. He was one of 
the best farmers in Madison county. His delight was to 
make his calling honorable and profitable, in both of which, 
as far as he was concerned, he succeeded. He was indus- 
trious, honest, and his word was good, and in his death 
Madison county lost one of its best citizens. 

The following are the names of Mr. Cattron's children : 
Margaret, born in Pennsylvania ; married Abner Thomas ; 
died in Kosiusko county, Ind. William, born in Indiana, 
February 27, 1841 ; married Mrs. Josie Hamlin, who was 
born in Ripley count}^ Ind., in 1847 ; reside on the old 
home farm. Jane, born in 1843 ; married W. H. Lumis ; 
reside adjoining the old farm. Sarah, married Isaac 
Brown; reside in Pendleton. Lucinda E., married Wil- 
liam Pyle, reside in Indianapolis. Eliza A., married John 
Turner; reside near Clarksville, Ind. Three of their 
children died when quite young. 

Mrs. Rebecca Cattron, the widow of David, is yet 
living (1894), at the advanced age of eighty-six years. 
She, like Mr. C, is worthy of notice as being a true pio- 
neer of Indiana, coming soon after marrj'ing to Wayne 
county, and for the past forty-five years a resident of the 
Quaker Settlement. Her life has been consistent of a true 
christian woman. She, with her husband, came with 
strong hands to the then new county of Madison, settled 
almost in the woods, and commenced the battle of life in 
earnest. They succeeded and plenty come to bless them 
in their old age. I am glad to give this wortliy famil}' a 
notice in the Pioneer, and to rejoice that David and 
Rebecca came and lived among us so long, and to leave 
behind them lessons of industry and frugality that marked 
their long lives. 




HON. M. U. JOHNSON, 
Superintendent County Schools, Madison County, Indiana, 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. I5I 

JOSEPH DRAPER, 

One of the substantial men of Monroe township, Mad- 
ison county, was born in Virginia, December 17, 1828, son 
of Thomas and Mary (Turner) Draper. Joseph Draper 
was married to Nancy Ewing, March, 1855, daughter of 
James Ewing, born in Kentucky, August 29, 1829. She 
died September 19, 1855, and is buried at the Barrett 
cemetery, near Knightstown, Ind. Mr. Draper was the 
second time married to EHzabeth Stephens. She was born 
in Rush county, Ind., September 3, 1841 ; married Novem- 
ber 21, 1858. She died September 21, 1859, "^^^ ^^ buried 
at Alexandria. One son was born to this marriage, Isaac 
S., born September 10, 1859; ^^^^^ March i, 1874; buried 
at Alexandria. Mr. Draper was the third time married to 
Anna Siler, June 15, 1863. She was born in Rush count}-, 
Ind., March 29, 1839. ^^^" father's name was Jacob Siler. 
Children born of this marriage are : May E, , born in 
Madison county, July 20, 1864 ' married to Grant Steph- 
enson ; Martha J., born December 19, 1865; married to 
Wm. Blake, August 12, 1894; Peter T., born August 8, 
1867; married to Elizabeth Thurston, October 12, 1891 ; 
reside in Monroe township; John W., born June 18, 1869, 
single (i8g^). Mr. Joseph Draper resides five miles east 
of Alexandria, where he owns a fine farm, well cultivated. 
He owned at one time five hundred acres of choice land in 
Monroe township. He and his wife are industrious and 
have the confidence of the people where they have so long 
resided, since 1862, w^hen they came from Rush county, 
Indiana, and settled in the then new county. Mr. Draper 
has alwa3's been a stanch Republican and he and his wife 
belong to the Christian church. Their home is one of 
plenty and they delight to entertain their many friends. 
Peter T., their son, who is a teacher of long experience, 
lives near the old folks. Thanks to the family for kind- 
nesses received. Mr. Draper's parents came to Rush 
county, Indiana, in 1833. He died December, 1873. She 



152 THE PIONEERS OF 

died June, 1875. Buried at the Walnut Grove Cemetery 
in that county. 

ALEXANDER INGLIS, 

One of Madison counties best men, was born in Davis 
county. North Carolina, September 20, 1819. On August 
31, 1843, he was married to Mary C. Baker. They moved 
to VanBuren township about the year 1838, where they 
resided up to the time of their respective deaths. Mrs. 
Inglis died July 19, 1889;. Mr. Inglis, September 20, 1891. 
Buried at Mt. Pisgah cemetery, about i mile southwest of 
of their old home. The family was one of the best as 
w^ell as the earliest of that part of the county. Mr. Inglis 
was for years elected trustee of VanBuren township, and 
filled other places of trust among his early neighbors. 
The following are the names ot their children : Hannah 
E., born October I, 1845; married Thomas H. Vinson; 
Phillip M., born July 30, 1847, died May 8, 1852 ; Thomas 
N., born March 24, 1849; married to Susan Powers, 
daughter of David Powers. She was born in Madison 
county, Indiana, May 13, 1854; married August 16, 1874. 
Childrens' names: Ida C, born July i, 1875, ^^ ^ ^^^ 
musician and teacher ; Orlan B., born November 10, 1877 ; 
Ora T., born October 5, 1855. The family reside two 
miles west of Summitville, Indiana, on the line dividing 
VanBuren and Boone townships. Mr. Inglis is a good 
farmer, well posted on general subjects, takes time to read, 
does his own thinking, is a Republican, and a member of 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 

Mary J., fourth child of Alexander Inglis, was born 
April 29, 1851, died June 19, 1852; Samantha C, born 
April 26, 1853, married to William Webster and reside in 
VanBuren township. John A., born November 4, 1855 ; 
married to Sarah Hannan, daughter of James Hannan. 
She was born in Franklin county, Indiana, November 22, 
1862; married Nov. 26, 1887 — one child, Mar}^ E., born 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 1 53 

December 12, 1888. Syntha E., born August 15, 1858; 
married George Allen. She died December 14, 1878. 
William J., born November 7, 1861, married to Ida 
Thurston, daughter of Samuel Thurston, born May 28, 
1865; married December 3, 1885. Childrens' names: 
Raymond, born July 13, 1890 ; Edna L., born December 
12, 1891 ; John S., born April 22, 1887, died August 8, 
1889. Glad to notice this famil}^ who were one of the 
most^'prominent in the county. 

ISAAC W. JONES, 

One of the early pioneers of Green township, I wish 
to remember in this volume. He was the son of James 
Jones, w^ho came to the Lick Creek settlement quite early, 
about the year 1830, when the subject of thi^s sketch was 
about four years old, having been born in Greenbriar 
county, Virginia, September 19, 1827. Isaac lived in 
Green township for many years, where he stood high 
among" all the older people of Green. He was elected 
County Commissioner in 1864 and served a term of years 
to the entire satisfaction of the people who elected him to 
that responsible place. In 1858 he was married to Susan 
Boone, daughter of Ovid Boone, another early settler of 
Madison county. Susan was born in 1831, Her mother's 
name, before marriage to Mr. Boone,, was Ruth Baltrice. 
Isaac Jones' father died in 1864, and is buried near Alfont, 
Indiana, near the old home. The following are the names 
of Mr. and Mrs. Isaac W, Jones' children: Mary R., 
born in 1859, married to Richard Hidy ; the second time 
to Samuel Baker. Florence M. and Willie, both single, 
at home (1894). Mr. Jones was elected to the above office 
as a Democrat. In 1890 the family moved to the city of 
Anderson, Indiana, where they now (1894) reside. 

STEPHEN NORRIS. 

Mr. Norris was born in Ohio in 1804, and died in 
1878. He came with his parents to near Connersville, 



154 '^^^ PIONEERS OF 

Indiana, when quite young and the family resided there 
for several 3'ears. Mr. Stephen Norris was married to 
Eleanor Noble, who was born in Tennessee in 1806, and 
died March 3, 1888. They were married about the year 
1825 and ten years later (1835) came to Madison county, 
Indiana, settling in Monroe township, three miles south- 
east of Alexandria, where Mr. Norris lived many years, 
loved and respected by all who knew him. He was a useful 
man and clever gentleman, and did not belong to any 
church. He is buried at Alexandria, Indiana. The 
following are the names of Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Norris' 
children : Sarah, married to James Meredith. She is 
dead and is buried in Alexandria cemetery. Cyntha A., 
married to Milton King, who resides three miles southeast 
of Alexandria. Mary E., married to Joel Jones. He was 
born in North Carolina about the year 1830 ; died January 
8, 1892, and is buried at the Mt. Pisgah cemetery. He 
was a grand, good man, a member of the Baptist church, 
as well as his wife, who survives him and resides one and 
one-half miles south of Alexandria. Mr. Jones first mar- 
ried Rhoda Cree, a daughter of the late John Cree and 
sister of R. H. Cree, deceased. Lewis Norris, married 
to Miss Nottingham ; Elvessa L., married to Alexander 
Painter, reside in Summitville, Indiana. William Huey, 
died at the age of fourteen years, and is buried three miles 
south of Alexandria, Indiana. 

HON. ANDREW J. BEHYMER. 

I first saw Mr. Behymer in the year 1874. He was 
teaching school in the wilds of Duck Creek township, 
Madison county. He was then a young, smooth-faced 
man. Since then I have known him quite well and alwa3^s 
admired him as one of my very best friends in Madison 
county. Sometimes I almost wish he had been born here, 
but where a man is born makes but little difference. As 
the Irishman said : "If a man is born in a stable, it does 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES, 1 55 

not follow that he is a horse." Jack was born in Mt. 
Holly, Ohio, on the first day of March, 1850, just in the 
middle of the Nineteenth Century. What a grand time 
to be born. Should he live to be fifty years old he could 
not have lived in a more interesting period. In 185 1, Mr. 
William Behymer, his father, moved to Rush county, 
Indiana, where Jack received his education in the com- 
mon schools of that county. Ten 3ears later, in 1861, the 
family moved to Grant county, Indiana, near Rigdon, 
Here a farm was leased and a fierce struggle began. The 
family was poor but industrious, -,It was on this farm that 
A, J, Behymer toiled long and hard with the other mem- 
bers of the family until better times came. After Jack 
would work in the clearing during the day, he would read 
and study at night, not by the gas-light, but the hickory 
torch furnished him light to study by. Here Mr, B, laid 
the foundation for a better education and afterward attended 
the higher schools, and stopped not until he had fitted him- 
self for teaching. 

While on the farm in Grant county he and his brother 
Perry cut timber and hauled it to market, and this was 
about the first money he could call his own. On this farm 
he underwent' hard work and toil unknown to the young 
men of 1895, and be it said to his credit, he has risen high 
among his friends from poverty almost, if I may be allowed 
the term, for it is no reproach to any one, and certainly 
not to him. In 1862 his father enlisted in the army, and 
thus additional responsibility rested on him and his brother 
in caring for the family for three years. And when their 
father returned home from the army the boys turned over 
the farm in good shape and out of debt. 

About the year 187 1 Mr. B, commenced teaching, 
having obtained a twelve months license and continued 
teaching several years, when he attended Normal School 
at Lebanon, Ohio, with his valued friend, R. J, Hamilton, 
at one time County Superintendent of the schools of Mad- 



156 THE PIONEERS OF 

ison county. After returning from Lebanon, he with his 
brother, Perry, traveled west and visited the principal 
cities in Missouri, Kansas, Iowa, etc. After returning he 
again taught school in Madison county. On the 19th day 
of March, 1874, ^^^ ^^^ married to Mary E. Thrasher, of 
near Rigdon, Indiana. Soon after marriage they moved 
to Kokomo, where he taught thirteen months. In 1877 
they moved to Tipton, Indiana, where he, engaged in the 
real estate business for some time with ex-County Auditor 
Robert W. Wright. His next venture was in the journal- 
istic field at Elwood, Indiana, where he purchased the 
Review and Free Press and consolidated them into one 
paper called the Elwood Free Press, that was a credit to 
him, as he ably edited it for several years and gave it a 
standing it did not have before, and it is to this day one of 
the best papers in the county. In 1890 he sold the Free 
Press and entered the real estate business again, as the 
boom was on, and Mr. B. did his part to make Elwood 
what it is to-day, the second city in the county, a city of 
10,000 souls, and which he delights to call his home. 

In 1892 he was nominated for Joint Representative for 
the counties of Madison, Grant and Tipton, and was tri- 
umphantly elected in November of that year over his 
competitor, Hon. Charles Mahan. During the canvass of 
1892 Mr. B. developed fine qualifications as a speaker and 
debater, fitting him for the session of the Indiana Legisla- 
ture which con^-ened the tbllowing January. In this 
session Jack was placed on several important committees, 
and filled his place with credit to himself and satisfaction 
of the citizens he represented. 

In politics he is a Jackson Democrat and delights in 
the name, and is able to defend that grand old party in 
which he has battled so long and hard. On the 25th day 
of August, 1890, his father died from the effects of a wound 
received in the army. His mother resides in Rigdon, 
Indiana, near the old home. I am glad to write of my old 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 1 57 

friend Jack and say a good word for him, and record the 
fact that it is possible in this hxnd of the free to rise from 
obscurity to prominence by industry and sobriety. Mr. B. 
is a brother of Perry, an attorney of Elwood, and of J. O. 
Behymer, of the Tipton, (Ind.,) Times, both of whom are 
Hke Jack — stalwart Democrats. 

MATHIAS MADDRON. 

Mr. Maddron was one of the pioneers of Adams 
township, coming as early as 1833, and settled in what is 
known as the " Carolina" Settlement, south-west of New 
Columbus. Mr. Maddron was born in Pasapatack county. 
North Carolina, September 22, 1806. He was married to 
Lurena Clark, sister of Barney Clark, another old settler 
of Adams. She was also born in North Carolina on Jan- 
uary 5, 1809, and they were married there in the year 1820. 
Four years later they came west with little of this world's 
goods when they arrived, but by industry and frugality 
obtained quite an estate and lived to enjoy the fruits of 
their earl}^ labor. Mrs. Maddron died in 1863. He died 
November 23, 1887. Both are buried in the old cemetery 
just west of New Columbus and near their old home. Mr. 
Maddron was a strong man and helped much to make this 
county what it is to-day. He as well as his wife endured 
hardships the people of to-day (1895) know but little about, 
and I am glad to notice them in my work, among others, 
who first came to Madison county. Mr. M. was an honest 
man, a hard worker, and a member yf the Christian 
Church. Mrs. M. did not belong to an^^ church. 

The following are the names of the children : Lurana, 
born in Virginia in 1830 ; married to Miles Gray, and both 
are dead. She died in 1863, ^^^^ ^s buried in the old Bap- 
tist cemetery near New Columbus. Rebecca, born in 
Indiana in 1834 ' ^narried to Jeremiah Cullipher, and they 
reside four miles south of Anderson. Miles, born January 
21, 1836; resides in Anderson. He is a member of the 
Masonic Order and is a well informed man. I am indebted 




JOHN J. JUSTICE, 
Born in Ohio in 1826, died near Markleville, Indiana, 

August 14, 1S95. 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 1 59 

to him for the history of the family. Sarah, deceased. 
Mary M., married John Fort ; he is dead. She resides in 
Kansas. Emily, married to Samuel Tibets, resides in 
Indianapolis. Nancy, married to John Vanmeter, resides 
in Anderson, Indiana. William R., died at the age of 
four years, and is buried with the other members of the 
fomily. John A., married to Samantha Langle}^ is 
deceased. Me died in 1882 and is buried at the Whetstone 
cemetery. Joseph, born in 1852. Mathias Maddron was 
an old-time Democrat and will long be remembered as one 
of the Pioneers of Madison county and the "Carolina" 
Settlement. 

WILLIAM BENEFIELD. 

I am glad to give the Benetield family a notice in the 
Pioneer. A family of no ordinary note. A family that 
furnished four sons for the Union army. A glorious record. 
A pioneer family of Jackson township. A family that 
were strong, active men, full of that vim and determina- 
tion that was so much required in the early settlement ot 
the oountry. I was not acquainted with the parents, that 
is Mr. and Mrs. William Benefield, but quite well with the 
boys, and it is with extreme pleasure that a page or two is 
given for a notice of them — two of whom are sleeping in 
Southern soil, baptised with Union blood. One of the 
family has kindly furnished a sketch of the family, which 
I know will be read with great interest by all. Mr. and 
Mrs. William Benefield are buried at the Perkinsville cem- 
etery, near where they lived so Icng. Levi is buried at 
Howe, Nebraska, where the famil}^ moved back in the 
earl}' seventies, and where they now reside. Isham resides 
in Tennessee, where he moved in 1893. 

William Benefield was born August 14, 1806, near 
Mt. Sterling, Kentucky. He was married November 9, 
1826, in Wayne county, Indiana, to Cynthia A. Kidwell, 
a daughter of Rev. Jonathan Kidwell, a Universalist min- 
ister of some renown, who was a great debater, having 



l6o THE PIONEERS OF 

joined in discussion with Parson Brownlow and Benjamin 
Franklin. He was founder of the Cincinnati Star and 
Philotnath Encyclopedia. 

William Benefield moved from Wayne to Madison 
county, during the year 1834, and settled in the woods, 
three miles north of Perkinsville on Pipe Creek, and made 
one of the finest farms in the county. He died at this 
place, November 6, 1870, his wite having died December 
27, 1854. ^^ ^"^^ ^ large, powerful man, and reared a 
large family of strong, healthy children, whose names are 
as follows James M., born May 27, 1827 ; died Septem- 
ber, 1848. Robert S., born October 28, 1828; died April 
10, 1862 ; was in the Union army, and lies buried at New 
Madrid, Missouri. Jonathan, born December 18, 1821 ; 
died in the Union army and lies buried at New Iberia, 
Louisiana. Rebecca A., born December 8, 183 1 ; died 
in Madison county. Indiana. Levi, born October 5, 1833 ; 
died in Noral, Nebraska, 1892. Leander J., born October 
10, 1835 5 died in Madison county Indiana, April 5, 1855. 
Isham Benefield, born September 14, 1837. Enlisted in 
the 34th Indiana Volunteer Infantry and was discharged 
in the spring of 1862 on account of disabilities contracted 
from camp exposure, while at Camp Wisklift', Virginia. 
At present he resides in Harriman, East Tennessee, where 
he is engaged in the real estate business. 

William H. H. Benefield, born September 14, 1842, 
is the youngest son, and enltsted in Company G, 17th 
Indiana Volunteers. April 22, 1861, in the first three 3^ears' 
company raised in the county. He served to the end of 
his term and was discharged June 20, 1864. After the war 
he was engaged with T. T. Beckwith in the mercantile 
business in Perkinsville, Indiana, the firm being known as 
Beckwith, Cole & Co. 

In the spring of 1869 he moved out into the green 
woods on a farm of 240 acres, four miles east of Perkins- 
ville, on the Anderson and Perkinsville Turnpike, just 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. l6l 

south of where Myers postoffice now is. In the course of 
a few years he cleared up and improved one of the finest 
farms in the county, which stands to-day as a monument 
to his industry. But owing to a series of misfortunes, 
over which lie had no control, such as hog cholera, barn 
and saw mill burning, sickness, etc., (his wife having to 
undergo treatment for disease of the eye for over four 
years), all these, together with the panic of 1873, caused 
him to have to give up the model farm he had labored so 
hard to save. 

In August, 1888, he got an appointment under the 
Harrison administration in the United States Indian Ser- 
vice, at the Omaha and Winnebago agencies. After the 
election of Cleveland, he resigned, {note) was not relieved, 
and went to Harriman, Tennessee, and engaged, with 
Isham, in the real estate business, but the panic again 
knocked him out, and he came back to old Madison county 
and settled in the town built upon the rocks — Pendleton. 
In November, 1894, he was elected Justice of the Peace 
of Fall-Creek township, and at present is known by the 
good people of Fall Creek as such. He was married to a 
daughter of Joel Epperly, a pioneer of Jackson township. 

QUINCY VAN WINKLE. 

While we are noticing to a great extent the old 
people of the county, we must not altogether forget the 
deserving. Especially those who have worked their way 
up to places of importance through their industry and 
perseverance. Perhaps there is none more worthy of 
notice than the one whose name heads this sketch. 

It gives me delight to record the progress that this 
young man has made, especially in railroad circles, that 
being his chosen avocation. A Madison county product, 
born on Fall Creek, in Adams township, son of the late 
James Van Winkle, who came quite early to that locality, 
but since 1852 has resided in the city of Anderson, where 
9 



l62 THE PIONEERS OF 

3^oung Van Winkle went to school and laid the foundation 
for future usefulness. He was married to a lady in Indian- 
apolis by the name of Annie Allison, who was born in 
that city, and they have their residence there, though his 
duties call him away much of the time. 

James Van Winkle, the father of Quincy, was born in 
Preble county, Ohio, in 1809, and was married to Casan- 
dra Prigg, daughter of Judge William Prigg, an early 
settler on Fall Creek, and at one time Associate Judge of 
Madison county, Indiana. Mrs. Van Winkle was born 
near Dayton, Ohio, in the year 1813, and soon after mar- 
riage sJie and Mr. Van Winkle came to Madison county, 
about the year 1834. Seven children were born to them, 
four dead and three living ; W. W. Van Winkle, born in 
1837, of Summitville, Indiana ; Mrs. Elizabeth Young, of 
Alexandria, Indiana, and the subject of this sketch. 

Mr. V. died August 29, 1888. Mrs. V. died at Ander- 
son, March 22, 1857. Both are buried at the Anderson 
cemetery. Mr. V. was an old-time Whig and afterwards 
a Republican. A beautiful rustic monument marks the 
graves of Mr. and Mrs. Van Winkle, at the Anderson 
cemetery. The following are the names of the deceased 
children of Mr. and Mrs. Van Winkle : Amanda, born 
October 11, 1844; died February 8, 1859. Berilda, born 
August 24, 1837 ; died in i860. Sarah M. (Britney), born 
January 7. 1842 ; died February 28, 1862. All buried at 
the Anderson cemetery. 

Below will be found a sketch of Mr. Quincy Van 
Winkle, taken from the Anderson papers of May, 1895, 
which will be read with deep interest by those who have 
watched the rise and progress he has made. About the 
year 1876 Mr. James Van Winkle was married again to a 
widow lady of Anderson, who yet survives. Judge Prigg 
was born in Maryland in 1790; died in 1876. Mrs Prigg 
was born in 1794 ; diedini87i. Both are buried at the 
Mechanicsburg cemetery in Henry county, Indiana. They 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 1 63 

came from Dayton, Ohio, in 1834,^ and settled on Fall 
Creek, near the line dividing Henry and Madison coun- 
ties : 

Quincy Van Winkle, Superintendent of the Big Four 
road, is an Anderson boy and began work in the Bee Line 
office in Anderson under direction of John W. Pence, of this 
city, who was then agent at Anderson. 

Mr. Van Winkle has occupied his present position since 
March I, 1S93. He was formerly Superintendent of the St. 
Louis Division, and had occupied a number of places with old 
companies, when he resigned to go to St. Louis as General 
Superintendent of the Terminal Road Association of that city. 
His successful management of this property attracted the 
attention of President Ingalls, of the Big Four, and after the 
retirement of Joseph Ramsey, Jr., as General Manager of the 
Big Four, he was selected as General Superintendent. 

Mr. Van Winkle is forty-four years of age, having been 
born January 16, 1S51, in IVLadison county, Lidiana. He was 
educated in the common schools of Anderson, Indiana, and at 
the age of ten years began his railroad career as messenger boy 
and general ntility lad about the office of the Indianapolis, 
Pittsburg & Cleveland road, now a part of the Cleveland, Col- 
umbus, Cincinnati & St. Louis. It is an odd fact that Mr. Van 
Winkle has practically grown up with the roads which have 
consolidated from time to time into the present Big Four sys- 
tem. He has been away from the fold but a very few years. 
From 1S65 to 1867 he was news agent on the road, and has 
been emplo} ed consecutively as follows: From 1S67 to July 
1S73, a clerk in the station at Anderson; from July, 1S73, to 
December, 1S73, agent at Pendleton; from December, 1S73 to 
1S77, chief clerk in the Superintendent's office; from 1S77 to 
187S, agent at L^nion City; from 187S to 18S1, general yard- 
master at Indianapolis and agent at Mattoon, Illinois; 1S81 to 
December, 1882, trainmaster at Indianapolis; December, 1S53, 
to January, 18S4, agent at East St. Louis; January, 1884, to 
September, 1S8S, agent and division freight agent at Indian- 
apolis; September, 1888, to January, 1893, Superintendent. All 
of these positions were on the C, C, C. & St. L. From Jan- 



164 THE PIONEERS OF 

uary i, 1892, to March i, 1S93, he was General vSuperintendent 
of the Terminal Road Association at St. Louis. 

Mr. Van Winkle is entering upon one of the most pros- 
perous years of his railroad life. The system is showing 
increased earnings over the previous year of excessive depres- 
sion and the property has been handled economically in his 
hands. 

THE PARIS FAMILY. 

This large famih^ of twelve children, ten boys and two 
girls, came from Kentucky to Shelby county, Ind., in 
1825, where they lived several years, and where a part of it is 
buried. The mother and six bo3's came to Madison county 
in 1850. Mrs. William Paris died many years ago, and is 
buried at the Wilson cemetery, four miles south of Ander- 
son. The children were all born in Kentucky. The 
following are the names of their children who came to 
Madison count}' : Dr. William, Dr. Benjamin, Dr. Absa- 
lom, Lorenzo, Llo3^d, Stephen, Allen and John. All the 
family are deceased. Dr. William was a noted man in 
Madison county for years, a fine doctor and a preacher of 
note, as well as Absalom and Benjamin, William died in 
Prosperity in 1865. The following are the names of his 
children : Oliver was in the war of 1861-5. He is dead ; 
married to Amanda Brown. John went to Colorado ; mar- 
ried Miss Conaway. Ellen, married to Jesse Harris ; went 
to Arkansas. She is dead. Mary J., married to Marshall 
Bonner. She is dead. William, resides in the Indian 
Territory. Julia, married David Craig ; reside at Lima, 
Ohio. James, deceased. Francis, married to Dr. Kirby. 
She is dead. Isabel, born in 1849; carried to Thadeus 
Hill ; reside in Anderson. He is a blacksmith. 

Wi'liam Paris was the second time married in 1864 to 
Fanny Campbell. One child was born to them, Ida, who 
resides in Anderson. He was the first time married to 
Elizabeth Kellin. She died in 1863. He and wife and 
most of the deceased children are buried in the old ceme- 



MADISON And Hancock counties. 165 

tery at Anderson. His second wife died about the year 
1866. 

Absalom Paris was born in Kentucky in 181 2 and died 
in 1870. The following are the names of his children: 
William M., married to Mary to Ashby. Samuel, single. 
Mary S., married to Alexander Carson. John, married to 
Mary Poor. The Paris family was a large one and of tine 
talent ; could preach and pray, sing or doctor, as the case 
might require. 

WILLIAM GALE, JR. 

Mr. Gale was born in Richmond, Ind., October 9, 
1829, son of W. S. Gale, who came to Adams township, 
Madison county, back in the thirties, when the subject of 
this sketch was eight or ten years of age. Mr. Gale, Jr., 
was married to Mary J. Brown, September 2, 1855. She 
was a daughter of Robert Brown, and was born in 1838 ; 
died March 1 1 , 1892 ; is buried at the Wilson cemetery, 
four miles south of Anderson. She was a noble w^oman, 
and for many years a member of the Missionary Baptist 
Church at Union church, in Adams township, as well as 
her husband. He has been a member near fifty years ; 
was baptized by the late J. F. Collier. 

The followang are the names of Mr. and Mrs. Gale's 
children : R. Clinton, married to Dora Stanly. Ephraim 
E., married to Nancy Keller; reside in Hancock county, 
Ind. Margaret L., married to Perry Hull ; reside on Fall 
creek, in Adams township. Both belong to the Baptist 
Church. Vicus P., married to Laura Cady. Lorenzo D., 
married to Emma Stohler. Eddie, married to Ida Noland, 
daughter of William Noland. Carrie C, married to Cord 
Hoppes. Loran, single (1895.) 

Glad to notice Brother Gale and family in the Pioneer, 
as he is one of the old-timers in Madison county. 
LISCOM TITUS, 

One of the rising and prosperous 3'oung men of Mad- 
ison county, Indiana, is the one whose name heads this 




JOHN STARR, 

Elected Sheriff' of Madison County, Nov. 6, 1864. 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 1 67 

sketch. He was born in Adams township, January 22, 
1863, when the RebelHon was at its height. His father, 
Samuel Titus, came to the county about the 3'ear 1845. 
He was born in New Jersey in 1814. He was married to 
Eliza Seward, daughter of James Seward. She was born 
in Ohio, April, 1824. They were married in 1842. Mr. 
Titus died June 9, 1886. Mrs. Titus died January 15, 
1870. Both are buried at the Collier cemetery, in Adams 
township. Both were members of the Missionary Baptist 
Church. 

Liscom Titus was married to Martha F. McDaniel, 
daughter of Jacob A. McDaniel, on the i6th day of Feb- 
ruary, 1888. She was born in Hancock county, Indiana, 
August 9, 1870. The following are the names of the 
children born to Mr. and Mrs. Liscom Titus: Oscar O., 
born Januar}' 26, 1889. Zella M., born November 4, 1891. 
Justin E., born December 7, 1893. 

Mr. Titus owns a fine farm two miles south of Mar- 
kleville, where he devotes his time to agricultural pursuits. 
He is a well informed gentleman, and was elected Trustee 
of Adams township in 1894. He is a cultured man, and 
does his own reading and thinking. His wife is a lady in 
all that word means. 

ANDREW T. GREENLEE. 

I am glad to notice Mr. Greenlee in my work. He is 
one of the young, progressive farmers of Boone town- 
ship, three miles north of Orestus, where he owns a fine 
farm in a high state of cultivation ; in fact he is a model 
farmer, and resides in one of the best farming districts in 
the county. Mr. Greenlee was born in Kanawha county. 
West Virginia, September 29, 1847. Came to Madison 
county, Ind., October, 1852. He is a son of William and 
Harriet Greenlee. He was married to Prudence A. Ball 
on the i8th day of January, 1872. The following are the 
names of their children : Carl, Annie, Carrie, Harrv, 



1 68 THE PIONEERS OF 

Donald, Mary and Esther. Mrs. Greenlee is a daughter 
of William Ball. She was born February i8, 185 1. Her 
mother's name before marriage was Mary McCray, born 
in 1837. Mr. Ball was born April 22, 1822. Botli mem- 
bers of the Baptist Church at New Harmony. 

Andrew T. Greenlee is a member of the Christian 
Church and a Republican. Glad to give this worthy fam- 
ily a sketch in the Pioneer, and trust they may live long 
and prosper. 

THE SURBER FAMILY. 

This sturdy pioneer family came to Adams township, 
Madison county, from the Kanawha River, West Virginia, 
about the year 1828, and settled on Lick Creek. The 
older set consisted of five brothers and three sisters, as 
follows: John, Moses, Henry, Joseph and James. Mar- 
garet, married to J. F. Collier; Nancy, married to Carbon 
Jackson ; Anna, married to Edward Adams, all deceased. 
John, the oldest, whose cabin home appears in this work, 
settled on the south bank of Lick Creek, two miles south 
of New Columbus and five miles east of Pendleton. He 
was born about 1800 and died in 1873, and is buried at the 
Busby cemetery. He was, it is said, the strongest man 
that ever lived in Madison county, well fitted for a pio- 
neer, which he was in every sense of the word. He came 
strong and determined to make a home, which he did, by 
hard work and industry. He told the writer he cut and 
split five hundred rails in a day, and walked two miles 
each way. He was as strong as two ordinary men, yet as 
gentle as a child. If he liked you, he could not do enough 
for you. He was kind to the poor newcomer. John Sur- 
ber and family will long be remembered as a pioneer 
family on Lick Creek. 

His first wife died about the year 1846. He was 
again married to Parmelia Wagoner. Three children 
were born to this marriage. The following are the names 
of the children by his first wife : Riley, Andrew, ^Mrs. 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 1 69 

Manley Reger, Mrs. Isabell Riggs, William Harvey, Mrs. 
Melissa Shelton, Mahala, Susan. Andrew, Joseph, Min- 
erva and Maggie, are deceased. William Harvey resides 
in Seattle, Washington. Mrs. Manly Reger, on the 
county line dividing the counties of Madison and Han- 
cock. Mrs. Isabel Riggs resides three miles south of An- 
derson, Indiana. All the children were blessed with a fine 
physique, strong and active. 

Of John Surber's brothers and sisters I might say 
Moses was for many years a Justice of the Peace, away 
back in the Thirties. He died about the year 1876. Mar- 
garet Collier, formerly Margaret Blake, a grand, good 
woman, was born in Virginia, August 29, 1805. She died 
in 1894, and is buried at the Collier cemetery, in Adams 
township. Mrs. Adams died in California. Mrs. Jackson 
died near Logansport, Indiana. To the second marriage 
of John Surber, there was born: Susan, Joseph and Mar- 
garet, all of whom are deceased, as well as their mother, 
who died in Marshall county, Indiana, in 1893. 

HON. ROBERT H. CREE. 

Mr. Cree was born in Ohio in 1820, and came with his 
father, John Cree, to Pipe Creek when a young man, per- 
haps in 1839. At the age of twenty-five he was" married to 
Sarah E. Marshall. The following are the names of their 
children, now mostly dead and buried at the Mt. Pisgah 
cemetery, near their old home : Mary J., died August 21, 
1863. She was about twelve years of age. James M., 
died in 1849. George M., died April 2, 1882. John M., 
died October 22, 1887. He was married to Miss Walker. 
Armitta, married to Calvin Dean ; reside in Fairmount, 
Ind. Lucien A., died April 2, 1884, aged twent3'-seven 
3'ears. He was married to Mar}- A. Norris. She resides in 
Anderson. Florence, married to Robert Polk. She is 
also dead. Cal L., married to Josephine McCown ; reside 
in Alexandria, Ind. Robert H. Cree, the father, died 



170 THE PIONEERS OF 

November 26, 1876, aged fifty-six years. Mrs. Cree died 
August 9, 187 1, aged forty-nine years. 

The Cree family was higiily popular and influential. 
Mr. Cree was elected to the State Senate in 1875 from the 
counties of Madison and Grant. He served his fellow- 
citizens there with fidelity and ability. He died soon after 
his term was ended. He was a Republican and polished 
gentleman, one of Madison county's best citizens. He 
owned a fine farm on Pipe Creek, near the Mt. Pisgah 
Church, where he and his wife died, as above stated. 

Robert H. Cree's father, John Cree, was born in Penn- 
sylvania about the year 1794. He was married in Ohio to 
Elizabeth Smith. She was born in Virginia in 1797. He 
died in Monroe township in 1868. Slie died December, 
1888, aged nirety-five years. Both are buried at the Mt. 
Pisgah cemeter3^. Among their children were Robert H., 
Mrs. Ellen B.iker, Rhoda, Victorine, Elias, John and Mark. 

THE BRUNT FAMILY. 

The pioneer history of Madison county would be very 
incomplete without a notice of the Brunt family. They 
came early to Boone township, and at once became identi- 
fied with its best interests. They were moral, and their 
influence was always on the right side. They became 
identified with the Christian Church, and the parents, 
Thomas and wife, lived and died honored members, and 
their infl*uence went out and lives to-day. Of the family 
of Thomas Brunt the following have been more or less 
active and useful men : J. A. J. Brunt is one of the largest 
land-holders in the county, and connected with the banks 
of the county for years. He is unmarried. William D., 
long a resident of Madison county, was Trustee of Boone 
township for several years, and a preacher of some note. 
John R. resides in Anderson. He is a well informed man 
and a public speaker of note, and a true friend to the 
honest toiler. Mrs. Swindell, an accomplished lady. The 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. I7I 

Other members I know but little about. The following is a 
sketch of the family by John R. : 

Thomas Brunt, one of the pioneers of Boone township, 
was born in Currituck county. North Carolina, September 
22, 1807, and was married to Sarah Rich Lee in Roan 
county. North Carolina, April 23, 1829. Removed to 
Rush county, Indiana, in 1831, and from there to Madison 
county in the spring of 1836, locating in what is now Boone 
township, where he bought from the Government a tract of 
land, which become known as the Brunt homestead. His 
experience was much the same as befalls pioneers. No 
roads, onl}- such as he made, miles to a neighbor, cutting 
out a few acres of the wilderness on which to raise truck 
for his family, and contending with wild animals and birds 
for a portion of the crop. He and his neighbors gave the 
names to the streams and townships that they bear to-day. 
He was known as a thoroughly honest man, and was a 
leader in his neighborhood, and was elected to various 
local offices, with more labor and responsibility than pay. 
He served twelve 3'ears as County Commissioner with 
honor to himself and profit to the county. He was a con- 
sistent member of the Christian Church. He passed to the 
other side December 31, 1879, where his beloved wife had 
preceded him January 18, 1869, both with a firm taith in a 
better life. 

Ten children blessed their union. William D., born 
March 2, 1830; married to Adaline Reynolds; lives in 
Nemaha county, Nebraska. James A. J., born February 
2, 1832 ; single ; resides in Madison county, Ind. Eliza- 
beth Ann, born January 21, 1834; married Jonathan M. 
Noble; died in Kansas March 31, 1893. Nathan Lee, 
born January 5, 1837; ^i^d April i, 1846. Lydia Jane, 
born September 25, 1840 ; married William A. Swindell. 

James Brunt, an early settler of Boone township, was 
born in Currituck county. North Carolina, March 13, i77-' 
where he married Sarah Harris. Their ancestors came 



172 THE PIONEERS OF 

from England in 1663. They left North Carolina, Decem- 
ber, 1829, and settled in Rush county, Indiana, January 
22, 1830, and in Madison county in 1837, where he died 
August 13, 1865, aged ninety-three years and five months. 
His wife died May 31, 1853, aged eighty-two years, eleven 
months and four days. They raised to adult age three 
sons, Thomas, John and William, and three daughters, 
Lydia, Nancy and Polly. Polly married John Moore and 
Lydia Wright Smith, both pioneers of Boone township. 
Nancy, born March 28, 1800, never married, and is now 
living near the centur}-^ mark in age. Lives in Richland 
township. Sarah Ellen, born January 20, 1843 ; married 
E. E. Black, and lives in Summitville. John Rich, born 
July 29, 1845 ; married Lois C. Vanlaningham in Kansas, 
where he resided twenty-five years. Now lives in Ander- 
son. Samuel Ferebee, born January 20, 1849 ; married 
Loucrecia Wilson, and died May 10, 1883. Mary Francis, 
born February 28, 1852 ; married Joseph Hudson, and lives 
near Orestes. Richard Harris, born October 6, 1856 ; 
married Dora Runj-an ; after her death, Ellen Thomas ; 
lives in Boone township. 

The following letter was received from W. D. Brunt, 
w^hich will be read with interest : 

Peru, Nebraska, November 5, 1895. 

S. Hardin — Dear Sir: — Yours received. Will say I sup- 
pose my brothers can give all the dates of our family as well 
as I can. I was born March 2, 1S30, in- Davie county, North 
Carolina. My father emigrated to Rush county, Indiana, in 
1S31, and remained in Rush county until 1S36 or 1837. He 
then removed to Madison county and settled in Monroe town- 
ship, near where the Deadman cemetery now is. Remained 
there one summer and then moved to Boone township, where 
he had purchased 340 acres of land, on which 'he lived until 
the time of his death, which occurred December 31, 1879, 

When we first settled in Boone township our nearest 
neighbor was three miles away. The stock all run in the woods 
and got fat on the wild pea-vine. We moved into a pole hut; 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 173 

we called it a camp. We lived in that until father erected a 
log house. We then lived in that until in time it had served 
its purpose and was replaced hy a better one. In those days 
wild game was plenty, such as wild deer, turkey, wild -cats, 
wolves, panthers, bears, with some Indians and plenty of rat- 
tle-snakes. The first Sunday school I and my brother attended 
we walked three and a half miles. It was taught in a log 
cabin, and David Austin was the Superintendent. Mother 
taught us to spell and read before we ever saw a school house. 
The first school we attended was in a log cabin, and was taught 
by my uncle, W. H. Brunt. We attended district school from 
four to six weeks in a year. Sometimes we walked three miles 
and thought it no hardship. The spring I was of age I was 
elected constable of Boone township and served two or three 
years. 

I was married March 10, 1853, to Miss Adaline Reynolds, 
late of Virginia, and to our union eight children were born. 
All of our children died of consumption. My wife and I 
united with the Church of Christ in August 1S56, and are still 
members of the church. 

Respectfully, W. D. Brunt. 

HON. DAVID E. GROAN, 

One of the grand, good men of Madison county, I do 
not wish to overlook in the " Pioneer." He was born in 
Ohio in 1823, and was a son of John Croan, who was an 
early settler of Madison county. On December 25, 1848, 
he was married to Rebecca A. Vanpelt, who was born in 
Miami count}^ Ohio, September 15, 1830. She is the 
daughter of the late Judge Uriah Vanpelt, who was born 
in Ohio in 1802, and died June 4, 1846. He is buried in 
the Anderson cemetery. Her mother's name was Almira 
Daugherty, who was born in Ohio in 1809, and was mar- 
ried to Uriah Vanpelt in 1829. Afterwards to George 
Smith, in 1854, who was born in Virginia in 1799. He 
died October 13, 1861, and is buried at the Funk cemetery 
in Richland township. Mrs. Smith is yet living (1895J in 



1^4 THE PIONEERS OF 

Anderson. Mr, Uriah Vanpelt served as Associate Judge 
in Madison county from 1842 to 1846. 

Mr. David E. Croan, when married, was comparatively 
a poor man, but through industry and economy became 
quite well oft' at the time of his death — January 31, 1885. 
He is buried at the Anderson cemetery, with the deceased 
members of the family, and where a handsome monument 
is erected on the family lot. Mrs. David E, Croan died 
October 29, 1892, on the farm, three miles north of Ander- 
son, on the Alexandria Pike. Mr. Croan also died here. 
The family resided here for many years, where Mr. and 
Mrs. C. settled in the earl}^ part of their lives, and where 
they had carved out of the woods, one of the handsomest 
farms in the county and erected splendid buildings, the 
admiration of the passers-by. Mr. C. was a progressive 
farmer, fully up to the times in all things, and possessed of 
a fair education. He represented Madison county in the 
State Legislature in 1865-6, as a Democrat, to the satis- 
faction of the people whom he represented. 

Mrs. Croan was a noble woman, and an active mem- 
ber of the Christian Church for years. Her life was surely 
a success. She died at the noon of life, beloved by all. 
The following are the names of their children, of whom 
most of them are deceased and sleeping in the beautiful 
cemetery in Anderson: Telitha, born July 29, 1850 ; 
died May 25, 1853. Emma J., born February 5, 1852; 
died march 13, 1858. William M., born July 23, 1853; 
married to Jesse F. Myers, October 11, 1878. He served 
as County Superintendent of the schools of Madison county 
in 1882-3. Established a college at Shanendow, Iowa, 
and was its president for several 3'ears. Afterwards estab- 
lished a similar institute at Lincoln, Nebraska, until May, 
1895, when he removed to Anderson, amid the friends of 
his youth. Joseph D., born in 1855 ; married to Miss 

Dillon, daughter of the late Joseph Dillon, one of the 

pioneers of Richland township, Madison county. Mr. 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 1 75 

Joseph D. Croan early in life joined the Methodist Epis- 
copal Church, and studied for the ministry, and is a mem- 
ber of the North Indiana conference. Mar3^ married to 
Albert Dillon, is deceased. Nora, married to John No- 
land, resides on the home farm on the Alexandria pike. 
Allia, born August 12, i860; died January 23, 1882. 

Anna, born , married to Henry J. Vanpelt ; resides 

in Thorntown, Boone county, Indiana. Glad to give this 
interesting family a sketch in the Pioneer. 

AQUILLA NORRIS. 

'Squire Norris was a prominent citizen of Monroe 
township, Madison county, Indiana, for many years. He 
was born in Ohio in 1825, and came with other members 
of the Norris famih^ to near Elwood, back in the forties. 
He was married to Martha Starkey, daughter of William 
Starkey, May 24, 185 1, near Elwood, Indiana. She was 
born in Pennsylvania, November 4, 1823. Mr. Norris 
died September 20, 1896, and is buried at the Holston 
cemetery. 

The following are the names of Mr. and Mrs. Aquilla 
Norris' children : Louisa, born in 1852; married to Da- 
vid Milspaw ; reside in Anderson. Jasper, born 1854 ; 
married first to a Miss Cox, and the second time to a Miss 
Richardson, daughter of A. J. Richardson, of near Ches- 
terfield, Indiana. Amanda, born in 1855 ; died in i860. 
Laura A., born in 1857 ; died June 12, 1885, aged twenty- 
eight years. Jennie, married to David Nuding ; reside in 
the city of Anderson, Indiana. May A., born August 28, 
1862 ; married to Lucius A. Cree, son of Hon. R. H. 
Cree. He died April 2, 1884, and is buried at Mt. Pisgah 
cemetery, tour miles north-west of Alexandria, Indiana. 
May A. was married to Mr. Ciee in 188 1. Two children 
were born to them : Harry and Edith, born respectively 
November, 1881, and March, 1883. Mrs. May A. Cree 
resides in Anderson with her mother. Martha L., born 



176 THE PIONEERS OF 

September 5, 1864; married to Lewellen H. Vindege, 
resides in Anderson. 

Aquilla Norris, father of 'Squire Norris, was born 
July 4, 1763, and died February 16, 1854. ^^^ wife, Han- 
nah, was born in 1783, and died November 15, 1866. 
Both are buried at the Holston cemetery. Mrs. Martha 
Norris is a sister of Judge James Starkey. The family 
was quite prominent in and about Elwood, (formerly 
Quincy), Indiana. 'Squire Norris served many years as 
Justice of the Peace in Monroe township. He did not 
belong to any church. Mrs. Martha Norris is a member 
of the regular Baptist Church. 

ALLEN SIMMONDS, 

One of the pioneers of Lafayette township, was born 
in Franklin county, Indiana, November, 181 2. He was 
the son of William and Nancy (Kiger) Simmends, early 
settlers of Franklin, Fayette and Rush counties, Indiana. 
The father of Allen Simmonds was born in Maryland in 
1791, and died in Rush county, Indiana, in 1830. Mrs. 
Nancy Simmonds, mother of Allen, was born in Ohio in 
1793, and died in 1889, at the advanced age of ninety-six 
years, and is buried in Tipton county, Indiana. Miss 
Louisa Lower was born near Eaton, Ohio, March 18, 
181 1. Her father, Jacob Lower, was born in Pennsylva- 
nia, and died at Noblesville, Indiana, June 16, 1853. Her 
mother, Nancy Price, ^yas born in Oiiio, and died in Iowa, 
May 28, 1863. Mr. and Mrs. Allen Simmonds were 
married in Fayette county, Indiana, July 28, 1833, t>y the 
Rev. William Patterson, who died near Indianapolis in 
1850. 

Mr. and Mrs. Simmonds came to Madison county, 
Indiana, in 1839, where he had entered eighty acres of land 
the year 1838. Here in the woods this worthy couple 
began life in earnest, without money, neighbors, or in fact 
anything but plenty of grit and pluck, that has character- 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 1^7 

ized them all their lives. They lived, on their first arrival 
to Lafayette township, in a rail pen till a house could be 
built which was done as soon as possible, with the help 
of a few kind neighbors, and they moved into it, thinking 
they were at home. A little clearing was the next thing. 
Rails were made and a little log stable built, and then hard 
work set in and continued all through their life, or at least 
until they were obliged to quit on the account of old age. 
They saved in their early struggles and at last plenty 
came, and they had obtained, through hard work and 
economy, 446 acres of choice land in the western part of 
Lafayette township, where they now reside, surrounded 
by some of their children, who yet survive, and where 
they enjoy the confidence and respect of all that know 
them. 

Mr. and Mrs. Allen Simmonds have nearly all their 
lives been members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
and at their house, when there was no church building, 
meetings were held in their cabin home. It is now sixty- 
two years since this couple were married, and fifty-seven 
years since they came to Madison county. What a long 
time. Sorrows and joys have come and gone in those 
years. If any one would look upon this couple to-day 
(1895) they would not ask the question : "Is life worth 
living-? " 

The following are the names of Mr. and Mrs. Sim- 
mond's children. Six living and five deceased. The two 
first were born in Fayette county, Indiana ; Margaret J., 
born August i, 1834 5 married to Jacob Ashton, and resides 
in Madison county, Indiana. Nancy A.,' born August 21, 
1837 ; <^^ied October 31, 1838. William E., born May 20, 
1840; married to Margaret Sutton, who is dead. He was 
again married to Almira Lethler. James A., born Feb- 
ruar}^ 11, 1842; married to Sarah Parson, daughter of 
Samuel Parson. She died in 1892. Sarah E., born July 
12, 1844; died January 24, 1863. Rebecca, born May 15, 
10 



178 THE PIONEERS OF 

1846; died January 5, 1859. Jacob E., born April 18, 
1848; married to Malvina Penniston ; reside on the old 
farm. Mary E., born April 8, 1850 ; married to John 
Riley. Martha Isabelle, born October i, 1852; married 
first to Taylor Clevenger, who is deceased ; the second 
time to Milton Parker ; reside on Indian Creek, in Lafay- 
ette township. Elsa L., born December 7, 1855 ; died 
July II, i860. The deceased members of the family are 
buried in Lafayette township, except the two first named. 
William resides near the old home. James A. resides in 
Anderson. I am glad to give this worthy pioneer family 
a notice in this work, and trust that nothing but happiness 
may attend them through life. 

JUDGE ELI HODSON. 

Mr. Hodson was born in North Carolina in 1805 ; came 
to Madison county in 1824. He went back, however, to 
Ohio, where he remained a short time, when he returned to 
Indiana, settling in Henry county, near the line of Madi- 
son county. Here he lived till 1843, when he became a 
citizen of Madison county till his death, 1879. ^^- God- 
son was a son of George Hodson, who came early to Fall 
Creek. He was also born in North Carolina, and married 
Miss Powell there at the close of the last century. This 
worthy couple died many years ago, and are buried at the 
Tucker cemetery, on Sly Fork, near their old home. Mr. 
Eli Hodson was twice married, first about the 3'ear 1826, to 
Lyda Hart, who was born in 1807. She was the mother 
of three children — Polly, John E. and John D. John E. is 
deceased and buried at the Tucker cemetery. After the 
death of Mrs. Hodson Eli was married to Cyutha Alshire 
about the year 1832. She was the daughter of Isaac and 
Elizabeth (Hoppis) Alshire. The}- are both deceased and 
buried at the Tucker cemetery. Mrs. Cynthia Hodson was 
born in Gallia county, Ohio; died in 1890 ; buried at the 
Tucker cemetery. Two children were born of this mar- 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 1 79 

riage, Isaac N. and Eli. I. N., born in 1836, married to 
Martha Seward, daughter of the kite SamuenSeward ; 
born in Rush county, Indiana, as vv^ell as her mother. Mr. 
and Mrs. Isaac N. Hodson reside on Fall Creek, Adams 
township, near the Hodson homestead. Eli Hodson was 
born on Fall Creek, Adams township, December 28, 1838. 
He was married to Lucinda Meeker, ^who was born in 
Henry county, about the year 1838. 

Eli Hodson, Sr., and his sons are Democrats, and he 
was as such elected Associate Judge in 1846, and served 
several years creditably to all concerned. In i860 he was 
elected Commissioner of Madison county, and served two 
terms, to the entire satisfaction of all. Mr. H. was reared 
a Qiiaker, but later joined the Christian Church, and was 
closely connected to the cause. In his death the county 
lost one of its best citizens. In private or public life he was 
honest and sincere, a true friend, jovial and well informed 
on all subjects. I am glad to give this pioneer family a 
notice in this work. The name of Hodson must go along 
with the early history of Madison county. 

SETH SMITH, 

One of the early attorneys of Anderson, was born in 
the State of Massachusetts December 11, 1814. He had 
the advantage of a good common education at the schools 
of his native State, and graduated at Amherst College in 
1836. Soon after he determined to come west and seek a 
location to practice law, and in 1839 came to Anderson, 
and soon obtained a fine practice for those days. There 
were for his associates at the bar Judge Richard Lake, John 
Davis, R. N. Williams and William O'Neal, all able men 
and all dead except Lake. 

In March, 1842, Mr. Smith was married to Sarah D. 
Jones, sister of Enoch and Spicer Jones. She was born in 
Pennsylvania, August 29, 1819. She died in Anderson, 
February i, 1874. ^^' Smith died February 12, 1852. 



l8o THE PIONEERS OF 

Both buried at Anderson cemetery. The following are the 
names of their children : Edward, born September 2, 1843 ; 
died in infancy. Thomas E., born February 13, 1845; 
married to Adaline Martin, April, 1870 ; reside in Ander- 
son, where Mr. S. has been engaged in the grocery business 
all his active life, and has few, if any, equals in the county. 
Gertrude E., born February 23, 1843; married to Capt. 
Ethan Allen, July 7, 1868. He was in the army and served 
three years faithfully. He died near Anderson, August i, 
1879 ' born August 26, 1837 '■> buried, as well as three sons, 
in the Anderson cemetery. He was the son of the late W. 
B. Allen, who died January 8, 1882. Mrs. W. B. Allen 
died December 7, 1879 ' both buried at Anderson cemetery. 
Electa H., daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Seth Smith, was 
born August 24, 185 1 ; married to D. C. Jones. She died 
November 11, 1881 ; buried at the Anderson cemetery. 

Mr. and Mrs. Seth Smith were members of the Bap- 
tist Church. Glad to give this early family a notice in the 
Pioneer. 

C. R. REEVES, 

Son of Hon. B. F. Reeves, of Hancock county, Ind., 
was born near Warrington, that county. May 3, 1864. He 
was raised on a farm, and received a good common educa- 
tion at the schools of Warrington. At the age of eighteen 
he went to Knightstown, Ind., and learned the art of pho- 
tography, and located in the city of Anderson in 1887, 
where he operates one of the best art galleries in Central 
Indiana. He was married to Cecile Turner, October 16, 
1887. She was born in Randolph county, Ind., May 17, 
1870. They reside in Park Place, or Ruddle's Heights, 
where they have a fine residence. Mr. and Mrs. Reeves 
belong to the Christian Church in Anderson. He belongs 
to the Knights of Pythias, and was a charter member of 
the lodge at Knightstown. 

WILLIAM SAUNDERS. 

One of the pioneers of Adams township, Madison 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. lOI 

county, Indiana, was William Saunders. He was born 
in Pennsylvania about the year 1805, and was married to 
Catharine Fesler in Pennsylvania in 1832. She was born 
in 1797. Came to Madison county in 1840, where the}' 
resided until death. Both died in the year 2875. He in 
August, she in July ; buried at the Lutheran cemetery at 
New Columbus. Both were Lutherans. Mr. S. was a 
splendid farmer, an honest man and a sturdy, old-time 
Democrat. The Saunders' were formerly tVotn Germany. 
The following are the names of Mr. and Mrs. Wil- 
liam Saunders' children: John, died in infancy. Jacob, 
married to Mariah Shawver ; both dead. George, mar- 
ried to Lucinda Judd. He died in 1862, and is buried at 
the Lutheran cemetery, at Ovid, or New Columbus. She 
died in 1856, and is buried at the Gilmore cemetery. 
Elizabeth, married to Elsbury Scott. He died 1892. She 
is living (1895); four children were born to them; all 
living. There was born to George Saunders tive children, 
three dead and two living. Their names are as follows: 
John, William, George, Jacob and Hiram. George, mar- 
ried to Elizabeth Stohler, daughter of Michael Stohler. 
They were married June 29, 1875, ^"^ reside near Ovid, 
Indiana. Seven children were born to them — five boys 
and two girls. George, like his father and grand-father, 
is a Democrat. Mrs. William Saunders was a sister to 
Peter, Jacob, and David Fesler. 

AARON WARNER BROWN, 

One of the pioneers of Madison county, I find the one 
whose name heads this sketch. He was born in Mary- 
land in the year 181 2, son of Stephen Brown. He was 
married to Louvina Clark in 1837 i" the State of Ohio, 
where she was born in 1815, daughter of Samuel Clark, an 
early setder of Belmont county, that State. In 1839 Mr. 
and Mrs. Brown decided to come west, and in the fall of 
that year landed in Madison count}', three miles south-east 



l82 THE PIONEERS OF 

of Anderson. In and in the vicinity of Anderson this 
couple resided till Mr. Brown's death in 1863. He died in 
Anderson, and is buried in the old cemetery. Mrs. Brown 
resides in Anderson to-day (1895), hale and hearty for one 
of her age. She is well posted on the early events of the 
county, knows all abovit pioneer life and the trials and 
hardships of a frontier life. 

The following are the names of the children born to 
Mr. and Mrs. Aaron Warner Brown : William, born 
December 17, 1839; m^iiTied to Julia Hardy; reside in 
Delaware county, Ind. Stephen, born July 2, 1842 ; died 
in 1877. George W., born July 4, 1843 ; married to Mattie 
Whitaker. She died in Illinois in 1875. George is a fine 
workman in his line, painting and paper hanging ; resides 
w^ith his mother in Anderson. Samuel, born July 17, 1846 ; 
married to Sarah Hutchison ; reside in Anderson. Sam is 
a fine business man, and a gentleman three hundred and 
sixty-five days in each year. If you want any fresh fish 
call on him.- Eliza, born February 5, 1848; married first 
to William Snell ; the second time to Elias Petty ; reside in 
Anderson. Henry Clay, born January 12, 1852; married 
to Ada Ulin, daaghter of A. M. Ulin, one of the pioneers 
of Madison county. Charles, born May 7, 1857 ; married 
first to Anna Ham ; second time to a lady in Indianapolis, 
where they now reside. Two other children born died in 
infancy. Mr. and Mrs. Aaron Warren Brown were mem- 
bers of the M. E. Church for years. 

WILLIAM STANLEY, 

Son of John H. Stanley, was born three miles south- 
east of the city of Anderson, Madison county, Indiana, in 
1842. He was raised on a farm, which has always been 
his delight. He received only the advantages of the com- 
mon schools of the county, but has made the best possible 
use of his education, and I have often wondered how he 
has so wonderfully succeeded, for he to-day is one of the 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 183 

best posted men and speakers our county has ever pro- 
duced ; an able advocate of the People's party for the past 
ten years, or in fact since its organization. No man is 
better informed on our monetery system than Mr. Stanley, 
and, whether in a private talk or public debate, he is at 
home on his chosen theme. He was chosen in 1894 to 
make the race for County Commissioner by his part}-, and 
received a very flattering vote in November of that year. 
When about twenty-four years of age he was married to 
Miss Tucker, by whom he has had eight children born to 
them. In 1894 he bought four hundred acres of choice 
land in Green township, with a fine brick house on it, and 
has to-day a model farm of the county, six miles south- 
west of Pendleton. During the war of 1861-5 he enlisted 
in Company F, Thirty-fourth Indiana Volunteers, and 
served three years faithfully and well. 

Mr. Stanley is one of our progressive farmers, fully up 
to the times, has all the improved implements on his farm, 
and good crops is the result, if the season is at all favora- 
ble. He is a great reader, takes the papers, and reads 
them, and is a pleasant fire-side talker, as well as public 
speaker. Call and see him when in Green, for the latch- 
string is always out and plenty within. 

ANDREW JACKSON. 

I could not think of writing up the pioneers of Mad- 
ison county, Indiana, without noticing Mr. and Mrs. 
Andrew Jackson, both early and long honored citizens. 
Mr. J. was born in Clermont count}^ Ohio, in 1801, and 
was married to Amelia Blanchard, in Ohio, May, 1820. 
She was born in Pennsylvania in 1801. They came to 
Madison county, Indiana, in 1827. Mr. J. at once became 
prominent in the county, and as early as 1830 he was 
elected Sheriff' of the county. In 1833 he was elected 
Treasurer, and in 1807, Clerk of the Court, and in 1845 
represented the county in the Lower House. In 1857 he 



184 THE PIONEERS OF 

was elected Senator for the counties of Madison and 
Hancock. To all of the above offices he was elected as a 
Democrat, and tilled all of them with credit. Later in 
life he was elected Justice of the Peace. All this time Mr, 
Jackson was extensively engaged in milling and farming, 
and at one time was quite wealthy. No man in the county 
enjoyed the entire confidence of the people more than 
Andrew Jackson. He died April 23, 1878. Mrs. Jackson 
died DecemT^er 15, 1876. Both are buried in the Ander- 
son cemetery. 

The following are the names of the children born to 
Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Jackson : James M., born in Ohio 
about the year 182 1 ; married a Miss McAllister, daughter 
of John McAllister. He resides in Arkansas. Jane, born 
in Ohio in 1823 ; married to Jacob Zeller ; both deceased, 
and buried at Perkinsville, Indiana. David B., born in 
Ohio in 1825 ; married Susan Craycraft. He died June 
26, 1884, and is buried at the Anderson cemetery. Enoch 
M., born in Preble county, Ohio, January 3, 1826 ; married 
to Mary J. Hilman, December 15, 1850. She died Sep- 
tember 23, 1861, and is buried in the Anderson cemetery. 
He was married the second time to Fanny Burns, Decem- 
ber 16, 1874, '^"<^^ ^^^6 third time to Sallie Boone, in 1878. 
He died in Anderson, March 29, 1888. Matilda, born in 
1828 in Indiana; married to Frank Sparks; both died in 
1886 and are buried in Tennessee. Belinda A., born in 
Indiana, and died aged eleven years. Mary A., born in 
Indiana in 1830 ; married to Ralph Clark. He died June 
I, 1874, and is buried at the Anderson cemetery. Eliza, 
born in Indiana, June 25, 1833; married to John Sabin, 
February, 1857. He died December 16, 1883, and is 
buried at Anderson. Charles G., born in Indiana in 1835 5 
married to Mary Shelly. He died in 1859 ^"*^ ^^ buried 
at the Anderson cemetery. Caroline, born in Indiana in 
1837 ; married to E. C. Bliven in 1861, and now reside in 
Anderson. Martha, born in Indiana in 1837 ! married to 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 1 85 

Sanford Raddish ; reside in Richmond, Indiana. Two or 
three children died in infancy. Mrs. John M. Sabin re- 
sides in Anderson. She was married in 1857. Her 
childrens' names are: Margaret A., married to Oliver 
Hayes; Barton W., single, and Martha C, born June 
17, 1855; married to J. H. Finnesay, in April, 1891, and 
reside in Anderson. He was born in Ohio, March 29, 
1867 ; reside in Anderson, Indiana. 

THOMAS MOORE AND FAMILY. 

Mr. Moore is one of the few men that lived and died 
on the land he entered. Besides this, the family is a 
noted one, and has other interesting features. Twelve 
children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Moore. All 
lived to man and womanhood, most of whom have been 
called to till responsible places in their respective localities. 
Joseph A. was for years Clerk of the Tipton County Court, 
elected in 1874 ; Thomas ■^•' Sheriff ot Madison county; 
Matt, deputy Sheriff and detective for the Pan-Handle 
Railroad. One or two others have served as Justice of the 
Peace. Five out of the eight have been or are now mem- 
bers of the Masonic lodges of the county. Three of the 
daughters, after having married well, are widows to-day 

(1895). 

Mr. and Mrs. Moore first settled in Pipe-Creek town- 
ship, Madison county, about the year 1839, °^ ^^^^ county 
line, three miles west of Frankton and four miles south of 
Elwood. Here in the new county a life of toil and hard 
work began, four of the oldest children having been born 
in Virginia before they came to Indiana. Mr. M. was 
born in Virginia in 1799, son of Isaac Moore, the mother's 
name before marriage being Babbitt. She was also born 
in V^irginia in 1809. They were married in Virginia in 
1829, and moved to Wayne county, Ind., in 1838, where 
they stopped a short time before the}" decided to move 
farther west to Madison county. Mr. Moore died on the 



1 86 THE PIONEERS OF 

old home farm, July 30, 1877, in the seventy-eighth year 
of his age. He, as well as other members of the family, 
are buried at the Pleasant Hill cemetery in Tipton county, 
near the old home. Mrs. Moore died August 23, 1883 5 
also in the seventy-eighth 3'ear of her age. Mr. and Mrs. 
Moore were members of the United Brethren Church, and 
were held in high esteem where they lived so long. 

The following are the names of the twelve children : 
John, born in Virginia in 1830 ; resides in Hamilton county, 
Ind. Letha, born in 1832 ; married to Arch Anderson. 
He is deceased. She resides in Elwood. Julia, born in 
1833 ; rnarried to Iradell Wright, who was Commissioner 
of Tipton county for years. He is deceased. She resides 
in Elwood. William J., born in 1834; married to Sophia 
Brown ; reside in Hamilton count}', Ind. Joseph A., born 
in Wa3'ne county, Ind., in 1835 5 married to Angeline Arm- 
field, who was born in Henry county, Ind., October, 1839. 
Joseph belongs to the Masonic order ; his wife to Eastern 
Star degree ; reside in Tipton. Alfred, born in Wayne 
county ; died June 2, 1856, aged twenty-three years, seven 
months and eleven days. James L., died March 6, 1865, 
aged twenty-seven years, ten months and eleven days. He 
was married to Louiza Kidwell ; she died in 1873. Thomas 
R. and Jane (twins), born May 13, 1841, in Madison 
county. He was married first to Sarah J. Gronend3^ke, 
February 12, 1863 ; second time to Lydia A. Pogue. He 
resides in Elwood ; was four years Sheriff' of Madison 
county. His first wife died October, 187 1 ; is buried at 
Elwood. Jane was married to John DeHority. He died 
in 1880; is buried at Elwood. Isaac, born in 1845 ; mar- 
ried to Sarah Polly. He died in 1874, ^S^^ twenty-nine 
years, three months and twenty days. Maranda, born in 
1846; married to John Allman. She died September 25, 
1867, aged twenty-one years and nineteen days. Madi- 
son, born September 4, 1849; married to Eliza Barton, 
September i, 1874. She was born in Middletown, Ind., 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 1 87 

March 24, 1851, daughter of William Barton. They reside 
in Anderson. Mrs. Moore is a christian lady of many 
virtues. 

Mr. Thomas Moore's father, who also came to Madi- 
son county, whose name was Isaac, died in 1853, aged 
ninety-four years. His wife died in 1855, aged ninety-two 
years. Both buried in Frankton cemetery. 

MILTON RUDDEL. 

I do not wish to forget Milton Ruddle and family in 
the "Pioneer." Mr. R. was born in Bourbon countv, 
Kentucky, on the i8th day of August, 1828. He was a 
son of John B. Ruddle, who was an early settler of Madi- 
son county, Indiana. John B. Ruddle's wife's name before 
marriage was Jemima Bell. The family first settled in 
Wayne county, Indiana, until 1833, when they came to 
near Anderson, where Milt, has resided ever since. On 
the 23rd day of December, 1856, he was married to Ellen 
Coburn, a daughter of the late Joseph Coburn, whose 
wife was Margaret Nelson. Mr. Coburn died in 1875. 
Mrs. Coburn died in 1861. John B. Ruddle died in 1834, 
soon after coming to Madison county. He is buried in 
Wayne county, Indiana. Mrs. Ruddle died in 185 1, and 
is buried in the Anderson cemetery. 

The following are the names of Mr. and Mrs. Milton 
Ruddle's children : Margaret, born in February, 1859 » 
she died in 1878, aged about twenty years. William, born 
in 1859; rnarried to Miss A. Moore; resides in Park 
Place. Athaliah, married to William Carroll ; reside in 
Park Place. Benny, married to Samuel Millspaw. Daisy, 
born in 1877, single, at home. 

Mr. Ruddle owns a fine farm just north-east of Ander- 
son, and in 1891 built a fine residence overlooking the 
city and Park Place. The latter was laid out by him in 
1891, and consists of 150 lots. This is a beautiful place, 
and is situated between his house and the river. On the 



lOb THE PIONEERS OF 

heights just west of his residence is the Ruddle Grove, so 
well known by all the people as one of the handsomest 
spots in the county, and where the annual Old Settlers' 
meetings are held, as well as other gatherings. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ruddle are among the highly respected 
people of Madison county, where they have lived so long. 
He is a Mason and delights in its noble teachings. Mrs. 
R. is noted for her charitable and lady-like deportment in 
all the relations of life. Am glad to say a word about 
them in this work. 

JOHN G. RICHARDSON, 

One of the pioneers of Union township, Madison 
covmty, Indiana, was born in North Carolina in 1796. He 
came to Highland county, Ohio, in 1815, where he met 
and married his wife, her name being Retta Burton. In 
1832 they moved to Madison county, Indiana, on " Sly 
Fork," where they settled in the woods and lived to make 
a tine farm. Mr. R. lived until Nov. 9, 1889. Mrs. R. is 
yet living (1895J at an advanced age, she having been 
born at the beginning of the present century — 1801. Mr. 
R. delighted in hunting in his early manhood, and there 
was plenty of game in Madison county when he first came. 
He was a strong, bold pioneer, fond of fun and frolic, and 
died a boy, though near 100 years of age. A Democrat 
of the Jeffersonian school, devoted to his family and 
friends. I am glad to notice this old couple in this work, 
and to know that their names will not be lost in time to 
come. 

The following are their children, seven in number: 
Ransom, married to Miss Little ; both deceased. He died 
November, 1890, she in 2893. A. J. Richardson, born in 
Highland county. Ohio, Sept. 28, 1827; married to Mar- 
garet I. Judd in 1854. He died in November, 1873, and 
is buried at the Tucker cemetery. Mary E., married to 
John M. Jester in 1863. He was born in Clermont county, 
Ohio, October 27, 1838. The}^ reside on the home farm. 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 189 

W. H. Richardson, born in January, 1844; married to 
Miss Catharine Poor, December 18, 1861. She was a 
daughter of the late George Poor, They reside tive miles 
south of Anderson. 

Four members of the famil}^ are deceased : Caroline, 
married to Daniel Bryant; both dead. Lizzie D., mar- 
ried to Jerry Gustin ; both dead, and both are buried in 
Sullivan county, Indiana. Two children died in their 
infancy. 

DR. JOHN W. WESTERFIELD. 

Dr. Westertield was one of the early settlers of 
Anderson, coming when it was a mere village, in 1838, 
and where he lived up to the time of his death, September 
29, 1895. All those long years he was closely allied in all 
its growth until it became a city of 20,000 inhabitants. He 
was born in Preble county, Ohio, June i, 1816, and was 
just as old as his adopted State, which he loved and lived 
in so long. In 1828 he removed to Fayette county, Indi- 
ana, with his parents, and in 1834 to Rush county, Indiana. 
He read medicine in Rushville, Indiana, and prepared 
himself for the practice. In 1838 he came tirst to Ander- 
son, where he practiced for several years and kept a drug 
store in connection. On March 17, 1842, he was married 
to Mary E. Bussell, who was born in Kentucky, October 
14, 1824. One son (John) was born to them, January 31, 
1843. He died July 23, 1852, and is buried at the Ander- 
son cemetery. 

Mr. W. was elected School Commissioner in 1843, 
and in 1846 County Auditor. He was at one time associ- 
ated with the Anderson Foundry and Machine Works, of 
Anderson, Indiana, and was its Secretary and Treasurer 
for several years. When the Anderson Cemetery was 
organized he was made Superintendent and Treasurer, 
and remained so until death. 

Early in life Dr. Westerheld, after years of research 
and deep study, became what is known as a Modern Spir- 



190 



THE PIONEERS OF 



itualist, and at once became the head and front of that 
church, the acknowledged leader and father as well. At 
the organization of the Spiritual Camp Ground, at Ches- 
terfield, Indiana, he was elected President, and was such 
at the time of his death. All along he was a valued mem- 
ber and gave liberally of his means to further the doctrine 
he loved so well. 

He was known far and wide as a liberal, kind-hearted 
man, a deep thinker, loved not only by the Spiritualists, 
but by all, and especially b}^ the people of Anderson. He 
will long be remembered by us all as a pioneer, doctor and 
private citizen. His funeral was preached by Mrs. Colby 
Luther, who paid a handsome tribute to his memory to 
over one thousand persons, who had gathered to pay their 
respects to one who was deserving respect in life and 
honor in death. 

His wife, all through this long journey — fifty-three 
years — was worthy of such a man. She shared hisji^ys 
and sorrows, and stands to-day (1895) as one of the grand 
women of Madison county and the great State of Indiana. 
See the portraits of Mr. and Mrs. Westerfield on another 
page of this work. 

JOSEPH FINNEMORE, SR. 

Mr. F. was born in Ross county, Ohio, February 25, 
1816. He married Sarah A. Griffey in 1836 in Ohio. She 
was born in Ohio August 21, 1822, daughter of David and 
Lydia Grifie3^ Mr. G. was born in North Carolina ; Mrs. 
G. in Virginia. Soon after Mr. and Mrs. Finnemore were 
married they came west, and settled at Alexandria, or 
where Alexandria is now. This was in 1836, when but 
few houses were built there. Mr. F. was the first smith 
there, and laid out a portion of the lots in that now busy 
city. He was among the first in the w^ork to make things 
go in and about their new home. He died February 25, 
1872, on his birthda}^ being fifty-six years old, just in the 




MAJOR SAMUEL HENRY, 

Born near Eden, Indiana, in 1S38, killed in Missouri, 

November i, 1864. 



192 THE PIONEERS OF 

prime of life. His wife died July 5, 1882. Both buried at 
the Alexandria cemetery, he being the first buried -there in 
what is known as the I. O. O, F. cemetery. They were 
both members of the Christian Church. 

The following are the names of their children : John 
A., born May i, 1838; married to Lydia Holland, August 
16, 1858 ; reside at Solome Springs, Ark. Lydia A., born 
April 19, 1841 ; died in infancy ; buried at Alexandria. 
Martha J., born May 12, 1842; married to William G. 
Kelljs February 9, 1862. She died in 1868. Sarah A., 
born December 19, 1844 ; married to Wesley Johnson, June 
10, i860. She died June 3, 1882 ; buried at Alexandria. 
Daniel M., born October 7, 1847; died October 17, 1848. 
Frederick, born October 23, 1849; uiarried to Maggie Jar- 
rett, December 4, 1875 ? reside at Alexandria. William 
W., born March 18, 1852 ; married to Mary A. Thompson, 
October 4, 1873. He was Marshal of the city of Alexan- 
dria from 1892 to 1894; resides in Alexandria. Joseph, 
born February 21, 1856 ; married to Emma Reese, Novem- 
ber 23, 1881. She was born at Richmond, Ind., July 18, 
1859. ^^^^ ^^ ^ ^^^y of fii^e attainments. Mr. F. is con- 
tractor for carrying the mails to and from the post-office to 
the railroads from 1895 to 1899. Her resides in Anderson. 
Alice, born August 14, 1859; married to L. M. Howard, 
Februar}' 25, 1879; reside in Alexandria. Charity, born 
April 3, 1864; married to James O'Donnell. He died 
October 27, 1884 ; is buried at Alexandria. 

Mr. Finnemore, Sr., was a member of the order of I. 
O. O. F., and among the first. He was a brother of Ste- 
phen Finnemore, an early citizen of Madison county. 

JOHN COBURN. 

I want to say a few words about Mr. and Mrs. Coburn, 
early settlers of Madison county, Indiana, for they are 
deserving to be remembered in this or any other pioneer 
work. Mr. Coburn w^as born in Warren county, Ohio, 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. I93 

December 30, 1818. He was married to Charity Ma3'nard, 
January 20, 1838. She was born in Pike county, Ken- 
tucky, August 20, 1829, and is yet (1895) living. Mr. 
Coburn died April 13,' 1870, and is buried at the Anderson 
cemetery. Mr. Coburn was an active man here for over 
tbrty years, having been a large trader in stock, and was 
elected County Commissioner, as a Democrat, in 1866, and 
served eight years. He was a charter member of Ches- 
tertield Masonic Lodge. He was an active. Mason for 
years. No man was better known than Mr. Coburn. 

The followinof are the names of Mr. and Mrs. Co- 
burn's children : Rhoda, born March 17, 1838; married 
to John J. Pence. Died in 1891, and is buried in the An- 
derson cemetery. Alfred, born December 13, 1842 : was 
Marshal of Anderson for several years. He was married 
to Elizabeth Pence, who resides in Anderson. He died in 
1890, and is buried at the Catholic cemetery in Anderson. 
Amos, born July 24, 1843; has been connected with the 
police force of Anderson for twelve years. See his por- 
tr. it and sketch on another page of this work. Francis- 
M., born October 6, 1846 ; married to Elizabeth Clodfelter ; 
reside in Anderson. He has also been connected with 
the police force of Anderson. William, born May 15, 
1848; died at the age of six years. Catharine, born Oc- 
tober 27, 1850; married to Lafayette Pence; reside at 
Paxton, Ills. Joseph W., born May 22, 1853 ; married to 
Mary Wampler. She died in 1895, and is buried at Ches- 
terfield, Indiana. Weams, born November 7, 1855, single. 

Rowley, born February 7, ; died at the age of seven 

years and is buried near Prosperity, Madison county, 
Indiana. Caroline, born October 6, i860; died at the 
Holston cemetery at the age of eighteen years, and is 
buried in the grave of her sister, Sarah, who died the same 
da}-. They died in 1878. This is in brief the story of 
one of the largest as well as the earliest families of the 
county. 



194 



THE PIONEERS OF 



TIMOTHY METCALF. 

Mr. Metcalf was born in Wayne county, Ohio, August, 
1843, son of David Metcalf. His mother's name before 
marriage was Catharine Jewell. Mr. Metcalf came when 
ten or twelve years of age with his parents to Madison 
covmty, where he has resided up to date (1895). He now 
resides in Boone township, near the Grant count}- line, and 
about six miles north-west of Summitville, his post-office, 
where he owns a line farm, which he delights to cultivate. 
In 1864 he was married to Lydia E. McMahan, daughter 
of Enoch and Elizabeth (Smith) McMahan. The following 
are the names of the children : David E., married Megra 
Nelson ; Enoch H., married Eva Runyan ; Albert J., Lizzie 
(deceased) and Kate. 

Mr. Metcalf was elected Count}' Commissioner of the 
northern district of Madison county, October 8, 1894, and 
took his seat (made vacant by Joseph Howard) December, 
1895. He was elected as a Republican, with which party 
he has always acted. It is a compliment to be thus honored 
to a seat on the board of one of the best counties in the 
State. He resides right in the middle of the gas belt, 
where everything is supposed to move, and he is keeping 
up with the procession. He moved on his farm in 1864, 
and has made many improvements, has good buildings 
and the home under a good state of cultivation. Mrs. 
Metcalf comes from a good family. Her parents were 
Methodists of long standing. I was at their home in 1874, 
and was kindly entertained by them. They are both dead. 
Mr. Metcalf is a brother of Stephen Metcalf, of Ander- 
son, well known in Madison and adjoining counties, having 
been editor of the Anderson Herald and postmaster of 
Anderson for four years. In person Timothy Metcalf is 
well made, florid complexion, strong and active. Glad to 
notice him and family in the Pioneer. 

ABRAHAM ADAMS. 
I could not well write the pioneer life of Madison 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 1 95 

county without saying something about the Adams family. 
Abraham Adams came to Madison county in 1823 and 
settled near New Columbus (Ovid), on the hill just south 
of town, now the residence of Mr. Scott. Mr. Adams 
was born in Virginia, October 10, 1767. He was married 
to Catharine Swartzbinder, in North Carolina, in 1791. 
She was born August 21, 1769. 

When Mr. and Mrs. Adams first came to their new 
home in the west their neighbors were few and far be- 
tween, and no roads, school houses, or anything that 
looked like living. But they had come to stay and rolled 
up their sleeves and went to work in the green woods. 
Soon neighbors came, roads were " blazed out," and signs 
of civilization came in time. The township (Adams) was 
named after him. He died January i, 1846, just in the 
prime of life, after seeing considerable progress made in 
his locality. He is buried at the Gilmore cemetery, where 
his wife is also buried. She died September 23, 1853. 
They lived on Fall Creek, where the Indian murders took 
place in 1824, and where Sawyer, Bridge and Hudson 
were hung for it at Pendleton in 1825. How could I for- 
get or neglect to notice such a family that lived in the new 
and stirring times of 1824-5. 

The following are the names of the children of Abra- 
ham Adams and wife : Jemima, born March 11, 1792; 
married to Daniel Adams. She died near Anderson in 
1855. Elizabeth, born August 11, 1793; married to Resin 
Sargent. She died in 1868 and is buried at the Tucker 
cemetery in Adams township. Mr. Sargent is also 
deceased. They were married in 1818. John, born June 
10, 1799; married to Rebecca Hinkle ; died in Oregon. 
They were married in 1820. Nancy C, born November 
17, 1801 ; married to Stephen Noland. She died in Illi- 
nois in 1877 ; he died in 1884. They were married in 
1820. Sarah, born August 23, 1804; married to Jacob 
Little. He died ir« 1862, she in 1888, and both are buried 



1^6 THE PIONEERS OI^" 

at the Tucker cemetery. Jesse, born March 23, 1808; 
married to Sallie Fisher. She died in Illinois in 1875. He 
is living (1895). Catharine, born October 11, 1811 ; mar- 
ried to John H. Williams, Januar3" 2, 1832 ; he died Sep- 
tember 7, 1847 ; born in 1806, and is buried at the Gilmore 
cemetery. She is still living (1895) and the only one. 
She resides with her son near Markleville, Indiana. The 
following are the names of her children : Isabel, mar- 
ried to W. F. Blake. They reside near Alexandria, Indi- 
ana, and were maried in August, 1853. Martha C, mar- 
ried to Washington Fort, and they reside near Fortville, 
Indiana. Francis M., married to Martha Hodson. She 
died in 1894. Amos H., married to Mary Eppard, and 
they reside just west of Markleville, Indiana. Esther, 
died about the year 1866, aged twenty-five years. The 
last one of the children of Abraham Adams was named 
Abraham, who was born July 5, 1814. He was married 
to Elizabeth Lanham, both of whom are dead. 

This is a short sketch of one of the early families of 
our now grand county, four of whom were born in North 
Carolina, and three in Ohio. Francis M. and Amos H. 
Williams, sons of J. H. and Catharine Williams, are both 
prominent men in middle life in Adams township, where 
they have resided all their lives. Marion has served as 
Trustee and Amos H. as Justice of the Peace. Both are 
Democrats and valuable citizens. 

JAMES SHAWVER. 

Mr. Shawver was born on Fall Creek, six miles south 
of Anderson, January, 1839, ^^" °^ George and Charlotte 
(Hinton) Shawver, who were early settlers on Fall Creek, 
away back in the thirties. They came from Pennsylvania, 
and were pioneers. James Shawver learned the shoe- 
maker's trade, and worked at it for several years, but of 
late years has been engaged in the saloon business at 
Alexandria and Anderson. He was married to Isabel 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 1 97 

Bates, April, 1866. She was born in Pendleton in 1850, 
daughter of the late .Hesekiah Bates, who died at the 
advanced age of ninety years. 

Mr. Shawver enlisted in Company K, Eighth Indiana 
Volunteers, September 5, 1861, and was in many hard 
fought battles that the gallant Eighth participated in during 
the war. He was discharged August 28, 1865, his term 
having expired. His Captain was L. D. McAllister and 
Colonels Shunk and Benton, respectivel}'. 

Two children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. James 
Shawver — Charles, born June 9, 1872 ; married to Mary 
Connors, April 24, 1895 ; reside in Anderson, and is asso- 
ciated in business with his father. Grace, born September 
9, 1883. Mrs. S. is a lady of many fine qualities and a 
member of the Christian Church in Anderson, their home. 
Mr. S. is a member of the G. A. R. Charle's wife was 
born in New Castle, February 19, 1873. 
CALEB CANNADAY. 

The above family is one of the interesting as well as 
one of the largest in our county. Members of the family 
came from Scotland to South Carolina at the close of the 
last centur}^ and where Caleb and his father were born. 
Caleb was born in 1804, and came to Union county, Indi- 
ana, where he was married to Martha Dwiggins in 1827. 
She was born in 1807, but came with her parents to Madi- 
son county in 1834. Caleb died in i860, and Mrs. Can- 
naday December 22, 1888. Both are buried at Frankton, 
near where the family settled in 1836, where their nearest 
neighbor lived two miles away. This was on the west 
bank of Pipe Creek, just west of the town of Frankton. 
Mr. and Mrs. Cannaday were industrious and compara- 
tively poor when they came to the new county and settled 
on Pipe Creek, but they had come to stay, and by indus- 
try and frugality plent}^ soon came to them and the new 
settlement soon filled up. School houses of the modest 
kind were built, but they served their day as well as other 



198 THE PIONEERS OF 

pioneer associations. Caleb Cannaday and wife lived to 
see vast improvements come and were foremost in all the 
advancements that came during their life-time. They were 
honored members of the Christian Church and their influ- 
ence for good lives to-day, though they sleep on the banks 
of their Pipe Creek home. 

The following are the names of their children : Mar- 
garet, born in Rush county, Indiana, February 3, 1829; 
married to Joseph Sigler in April, 1847. Mr. S. was 
born in Virginia, December 12, 1820, and w^as for eight 
years Auditor of Madison county. He was a member of 
the Christian Church. He came with his father, David 
Sigler, to Pipe Creek, in 1837. Joseph died in 1892, and 
is buried at Anderson. His widow resides in Anderson. 
Harrison, born in Rush county, Indiana, May 2, 1830; 
'married first to Elizabeth Howard, second time to Victoria 
TenEyke in September, 1867. He is an extensive farmer 
and stock raiser and was also engaged in banking at An- 
derson and Frankton. He and his wife belong to the 
Christian Church in Anderson, their home. Minerva, 
born in 1831 ; married to Jehu Tharp. They reside in 
Frankton, Indiana. David, born February 11, 1833; 
married to Margaret Hizor in 1855; reside in Frankton. 
Josiah, born November 11, 1835 '■> ni'^med to Mary Roach 
in i860, daughter of Lanty Roach. Albert, born in 1837, 
and died in 1861. He was twenty-four years old, single, 
and is buried at Frankton. Mary, born in 1840; married 
to W. R. Stoker, a prominent farmer living near Frank- 
ton. Both belong to the Christian Church. Mr. S. was 
born near Dayton, Ohio, January 23, 1830. He has been 
Trustee of his township and is a prominent Republican. 
William O., born in August, 1845 ; married to Sarah E. 
Townsend in August, 1888. He is a prominent doctor at 
Frankton, and has a fine practice. John E., born March 
22, 1847; married to Amelia Qiiick, September i, 1870. 
She died July 15, 1874. ^^ ^'^^ married the second time 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. I99 

to Alice T. Boys, daughter of Dr. Elias Blount. She, as 
well as J. E., are members and workers in the Christian 
Church at Anderson, their home. Mr. C. served eight 
years as County Auditor and practiced medicine two years 
at Mechanicsburg, Indiana. He is now in the furniture 
business at Anderson. Nathan, born in 1849; i^i^i'i'ied to 
Lizzie Furgason, and the second time to Anna Connor; 
resides on the old farm. 

The family is a remarkable one. Two are doctors, 
one a banker, one served as Auditor, and one son-in-law, 
Joseph Sigler, served as County Auditor eight years. 
David, Nathan and Josiah are successful farmers. W. R. 
Stoker served as Trustee for years of Pipe Creek town- 
ship. Margaret, Harrison, Minerva, David and Josiah 
were born before the family came to Madison county. 
Albert, Mary, William O., John E. and Nathan were born 
in Madison count}'. 

DANIEL WINDSOR. 

Mr. W. resides midway between Alexandria and Gil- 
man and near the Lake Erie Railroad^ in Monroe township. 
He was born in the old tar State, North Carolina, July 12, 
1840. His father's name was W. W. Windsor ; mother's 
name before marriage was Saiah Day. Mr. and Mrs. 
Daniel Windsor were married February 6, 1886. She was 
born in Madison county, December 27, 1846, daughter of 
John G. Wilson. Her mother's name was Susan Busby, 
daughter of Isaac Busby, an early settler of Madison 
county. Daniel Windsor and wife have no children, and 
are highly respected members of society, and also of the 
Baptist Church at Mt. Pisgah. 

Mr. Windsor enlisted in Company D, Thirty-fourth 
Indiana Volunteers, October, 1864, and was in the battle 
of Palmetto Ranch, but mostl}' on post duty. He was 
discharged at Brownsville, Texas, October 14, 1865. His 
Captain's name was Joshua Fussell, Colonel Jones. They 



200 THE PIONEERS OF 

have a pleasant home, where the}- welcome their many 
friends. 

JUDGE WILLIAM H. MERSHON. 

Judge Mershon was born in Middlesex county, New 
Jersey, October 28, 1798. Came to Dayton, Ohio, in 1829, 
and was there married to Mary J. Bourn in 1829. She 
was born in Massachusetts in 181 1. Mr. M. while there 
was engaged in the fur trade with Preston Ewing, visiting 
man}' of the outposts of the then new countr}'. In 1832 
he moved to Pendleton, Indiana, where the family lived 
till 1 85 1, and where all the children were born except 
Harry, who was born in 1856 in Anderson, where the 
famil}^ lived until it was broken up by the death of the 
parents, who died respectively as follows: Mrs. M. in 
1864 and Mr. M. in 1874. Both buried at Anderson. 

In 1842 Mr. Mershon was elected Probate Judge, and 
served seven years. In 1840 he was District Deputy for 
taking the fifth census of the United States for Indiana. 
He was a charter member of Madison lodge of Free and 
Accepted Masons, No. 44, at Pendleton. Elected County 
Auditor in 1852, and served four years. He was elected as 
a Democrat, that he was, and one of the Jeffersonian school, 
to which he was strongly attached. All along his long 
citizenship he was faithful to the trusts confided to him, and 
late in life was elected Justice of the Peace for his adopted 
city of Anderson. 

The following are the names of their children : John 
D., born July 1 1, 1834 ; resides in Anderson. He is a line 
mechanic, and at one time member of the City Council of 
Anderson ; was married to Marv Finnell in 1849. William 
H., born in 1837 ; died at Pendleton in 1886, and is buried 
there. Mary F., born in 1839; married to Hon. W. R. 
Myers. She died, February 2J, 1892; a grand lady and 
loved by all. She is buried at the Anderson cemetery. 
Mr. Myers was born in Ohio, October, 1836. Has served 
in Congress and Secretary- of State three times. Emil}', 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 20I 

born February 7, 1842 ; married to Robert Worth in i860. 
He died, July 8, 1882, and is buried at Anderson. He was 
born in Ohio, June 24, 1836. Cynthia, born in 1846 ; mar- 
ried to Rause Murray. She died in February, 1866, at 
Anderson. Alice, born in 1849 ; married to Henry Kesler. 
She died in 1878 ; is buried at Anderson. Nora, born 
August 3, 1851 ; married to Charles Altbie ; reside in River 
Side, California. Harry, born in 185 1 ; married to Cora 
Fox ; reside in Tipton, Indiana. A large and interesting 
family that will be remembered for time to come. 

Mr. Mershon w^as educated at Princeton, New Jersey, 
and w'as an architect of ability, a polished gentleman, and 
well posted on the early affairs of our Government. He 
was in early life connected with the Episcopalian Church, 
and as such devoted all his life, but of later years was not 
a member in active relation. 

Mrs. John D. Mershon is a minister of the gospel and 
a woman of ability. She preaches over considerable ter- 
ritory, and is well received. She was born in Virginia in 
1849, and was married to Mr. Mershon in 1865. 

LEVI McDANIEL. 

How could I write the pioneer life of Madison county 
without noticing Levi McDaniel and family, that I have 
known so long in Adams township, where I first met Mr. 
McDaniel in 1859. ^^ ^^^ then strong and active, living 
near the Hancock county line, two miles south-west of 
Markleville. He was born in Gallia county, Ohio, in 1823, 
but came with his parents to Adams township when quite a 
young lad, perhaps as early as 1830. In 1843 he was mar- 
ried to Elizabeth Shelton, daughter of Thomas and Mary 
(Carter) Shelton. She was born in Ohio in 1827, and also 
came with her parents to Adams township in an early day. 
Mr. McDaniel was a Mason of long standing ; w^as made a 
Mason at Pendleton in 1850, and a charter member of 
Rural Lodge, No. 324, at Markleville, in 1864. He was 



202 THE PIONEERS OF 

a fine mechanic, industrious, and a good farmer, which 
was his delight. He was a Universalist in faith, and, above 
all, the noblest work of God, " an honest man." He died 
in Markleville, March 15, 1895, from the effects of a fall. 

The following are the names of their children : Mary, 
born in 1845 ; married to Sol Creason. She died in 1873 
buried at the Walker cemetery. Malintha, born in 1847 
married to John Varner. He was in the war of 1861-5 
reside in Markleville. Cyrus, born in 1849; married first 
to Ellen Brewer ; second time to Amanda Jones, daughter 
of Charles Jones, of Wabash county, Indiana. Lusina, 
born in 185 1 ; married to Aaron Seward, son of the late F. 
L. Seward. Aaron was born in 1847 in Madison county ; 
reside in Anderson. Preston, born in 1853 ; died in 1873 ; 
buried at the Walker cemetery. John, born October 4, 
1855 5 married to Malinda L. Hammers. She was born in 
Henry county, June 26, 1855 ? married June 21, 1874. He 
is a carpenter, and resides in Anderson. Luzina, born in 
1857 ; married first to Wilson Younkins ; second time to 
Aaron R. Davis; reside in Muncie. Paul, born in 1859; 
died in 1879 ; buried at the Walker cemetery. Morrison, 
born in 1861 ; married to Rebecca Eppard ; reside in Adams 
township. Eletha, born in 1863 ; married to William Gray, 
son of Samuel Gray. Catharine, born in 1865 ; married to 
Lincoln Huston; died, November, 1894; is buried at the 
Walker cemetery. 

HARRY T. BEVIN. 

It is a pleasure to write of those as deserving as the 
one whose name heads this sketch and his wife. Mr, B. 
was born in Dayton, Ohio, June 12, 1868, and is a son of 
William H. and Lovina (Chrildland) Bevin. On the 7th 
day of March, 1894, he was married to Lizzie Fox, a 
daughter of William C. and Lucinda (Basicker) Fox. 
She was born in Madison county, Indiana, June 20, 1872. 
Anderson, Indiana, is their present home, where Mr. B. is 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 203 

employed by the Jung Brevvintr Company, of Cincinnati, 
Ohio, as their agent here, and has been for the past three 
years. Mr. B. is the right man in the right place. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bevin have a host of friends whom they 
delight to make welcome at their home. On the 6th day 
of June, 1895, their home was made glad by the advent of 
twins, a boy and girl, named Chester and Esther, who are 
the lather's pride and the mother's joy. Mr. B. is a mem- 
ber of the Red Men's order. No. 57, at Anderson, in poli- 
tics, a Republican, and in religion, a free thinker. 

HARRISON ALLEN. 

Among the prominent families of VanBuren township, 
Madison county, Indiana, I must not forget that of Harri- 
son Allen. Mr. Allen was born in North Carolina in 1814, 
and was a son of Richard Allen, also of North Carolina. 
Richard Allen and family came to Wayne county, Indiana, 
in an early day (1826), where they resided until 1845, 
when they came to Madison county, Indiana. Harrison 
Allen was married first to Jane Campbell, in Wayne 
county, Indiana, in 1845. She was the daughter of Abra- 
ham Campbell and was born in Virginia in 1816. She 
died in 1872. Mr. Allen died in December, 1884, and 
both are buried at the Vinson cemetery, near their old 
home. 

Mr. and Mrs. Campbell, parents of Mrs. Harrison 
Allen, came to Wayne county, Indiana, early in life and 
died there. Mrs. C. died in 1872. Originally the Aliens 
were from Wales; the Campbells from Ireland. In 1845, 
when Harrison Allen came to VanBuren township, it was 
a new county and undeveloped. They, however, came to 
stay, and went to work, determined to make a home, which 
they did successfully, and reared a large family. Mr. and 
Mrs. Allen lived to see great improvements come, and 
a thriving village (Summitville) built up almost at their 
door. 



204 '^"^ PIONEERS OF 

The following are the names of their children : Abra- 
ham, deceased. Elizabeth, deceased. Mary J., deceased. 
Sarah L., deceased. Almira, married to George Thomp- 
son. James, deceased. George, married to Cynthia E. 
English ; deceased. John R. Calvin H., born November 
6, 1839 ; married to Ada Weaver in 1879. ^^ served four 
years as Auditor of Madison county ; reside in Anderson. 
Joseph O., deceased ; buried at the Vinson cemeter}^. Mr. 
Harrison Allen was the second time married to Miss Vick- 
ory. She resides in Summitville. 

THE VANDYKE BROTHERS. 

In writing up persons of Madison and Hancock coun- 
ties one could hardly afford to forget the boys whose name 
head this sketch, James F., John, Wallace W. and Robert 
Bruce. The last two are twins. The father, Andrew E. 
Vandyke, was an early citizen of Rush county, Indiana, 
where J. F. and John were born. The twins, W. W. and 
R. B., were born in Huntington county, Indiana. Andrew 
E. Vandyke was married to Sarah Seward, daughter of 
James Seward, about the year 1842. Mr. V. died at 
Markleville, Indiana, April i, 1867; born June 12, 1825. 
Mrs. V. was born February, 1826; died February, 1880 ; 
married in 1842. They are buried at the Collier cemetery 
in Adams township. He was a fine blacksmith, and all 
the bo3's are the same. 

James F. Vandyke was born April 12, 1845. He was 
married to Frances L. Padgett, December 16, 1863. She 
was born near Marklevile, June 19, 1845. James is a fine 
smith, and works on Ohio avenue, Anderson. The chil- 
dren's names are Charles C, died in infancy ; Netta, mar- 
ried to Jehu Griffith ; Elias, William, Arthur H. and Lee. 
Mrs. Frances Vandyke's parents were John and Louiza 
Padgett. He died about 1852. Mrs. P. is yet living (1895), 
aged seventy-six j^ears. 

John Vandyke was born about the year 1847. He 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 205 

was first married to Polly Judd ; the second time to Miss 
Walker, of near Eden, Indiana, daughter of the late Rev. 
Miles Walker. John V. is a smith, and resides in Markle- 
ville, Indiana. His first wife died in 1892, and is buried 
at the Collier cemetery. She was a grand, good woman, 
and a member of the Baptist Church. 

Wall and Bruce, as we call them, were born October 
5, 1854. Wall was married to Miss Troy, daughter of 
Christopher Troy, of Hancock county, Indiana. She died 
in 1888. and is buried in Riciiland township, Madison 
county. He was the second time married to Miss Nibar- 
ger in 1891. Reside in Anderson. Wall was elected 
Sheriff of Madison county in 1892, and served two years. 
He was renominated in 1894, but defeated by John 
Starr a tew votes. Elected a Democrat, as all the Van- 
dykes belong to that party. Children's names by his first 
wife, Christopher and Blanche. 

Bruce, as well as all the rest, is a blacksmith, but the 
last seven years has been janitor of the Madison county 
court-house in Anderson, a place he has filled long and 
well. He was married in Sheldon, Illinois, July, 1874, ^^ 
Elizabeth R. Umensetter, who was born in Jennings county, 
Indiana, in 1859. Their children's names are Sada, Harry 
R., Grover C. and Albert. Reside in Anderson. 
HON. JAMES M. HUNDLEY. 

It gives me great pleasure to write of my esteemed 
friend, Mr. Hundley, of Summitville, Indiana. I first met 
him in the wilds of VanBuren towmship in 1874, when and 
where he was teaching school, and where he taught long 
and well ; a fine educator and teacher. He was born in 
Clinton count}^ Ohio, July 6, 1848. A grand time to be 
born, just at the close of the Mexican war and the discov- 
ery of gold in California. He, with his parents, came 
west and settled in Grant county, Indiana, in 1854 ; worked 
on the tarm till 1863, when he enlisted in the army, and 
served till July, 1865, at the close of the w^ar. 



2o6 THE PIONEERS OF 

Mr. Hundley received a good common education in 
the schools of Grant and Madison counties, and attended 
the higher schools at Anderson and Marion. He taught 
school ten years, then in 1883 commenced reading law, and 
was duly admitted to the Anderson bar March, 1883, since 
which time he has practiced law in Grant and Madison 
counties with good success. He has an office at Summit- 
ville, where he resides. Mr. Hundley's father was born in 
Virginia ; his mother in Ohio. Though poor, there was 
no better family than the Hundley. 

In 1894 James M. Hundley was elected as a Joint 
Representative to the Indiana Legislature from the counties 
of Madison, Grant and Tipton, and served his constituents 
with fidelity and abilit}'. Elected as a Republican, which 
he is, as well as his father. Mr. H. is a prominent mem- 
ber of the G. A. R., and has a warm grasp for the boys in 
blue. In a note from him he speaks of his mother in words 
of the greatest respect and veneration. No better com- 
mendation than this. Glad to say a word of Mr. Hundley. 
He is married, but his wife's name I did not get. 

ROBERT COLLIER, 

One of the active, progressive young men of Madison 
county, I wish to remember in the Pioneer, son of the late 
Phillip and Margaret (Judge) Collier, of Adams township. 
Robert was born in the extreme south-east part of Adams, 
November 6, 1866. He received a good common educa- 
tion, and has devoted his time to agricultural pursuits. He 
was married to Sue Wilkinson, November 28, 1891. She 
is the daughter of Joseph and Rosanna (Clark) Wilkinson. 
She was born in 1870 ; died January 2, 1894. One child, 
Hallam W., was born May 10, 1893 ; died May 17, 1894. 

Robert Collier joined the Missionary Baptist Church 
in 1886, and has been a taithful, active member of Union 
church ever since. An active Republican, and on the right 
side of all questions. His father, Phillip Collier, was born 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 2O7 

« 

in Ohio in 1826; died March 12, 1887. Mrs. PhilHp Col- 
Her was born in Ohio in 1832. They were married, May, 
1855. Mrs. Robert ColHer's father, Joseph Wilkins, was 
born in 1846. His wife was born in 1848 ; married Novem- 
ber 14, 1868. 

JOSEPH SHANNON, 

Another of the pioneers of Madison county, was born 
in Ross county, Ohio, in 1809. Came to Madison county 
with his father back in the thirties, and settled east of the 
now city of Anderson, near the "Mounds." He learned 
and worked at the carpenter and cabinetmaker's trade, and 
for years made the furniture that the settlers used in early 
days, which would not compare with the polished furniture 
of to-day, but would last much longer. In 1834 ^^ was 
married to Matilda Harpool. In 1833 he joined the M. E. 
Church, and all his life was a true and faithful christian. 
He was a fine singer and leader of the early calls in and 
about Anderson. He was fond of the gun, and was at 
home in deep woods and brush of Madison county. Deer, 
wolves and other wild animals trembled when he was in 
pursuit. In 1842 he built and lived in a house where the 
jail now stands. In 1842 he killed a large deer on the 
bank of White river, near the beautiful Park addition. It 
fell in the river, and was fished out and divided among the 
neighbors of that locality, among whom were William 
Sparks, Gary Hoover and others. 

The following are the names of the children born to 
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Shannon : Daniel, who died of milk 
sickness in 1842. Thomas, who resides on Fifth street, 
Anderson. Smith D., who resides in Indianapolis. The 
wives of tlie Shannons were buried in the old cemetery at 
Anderson, on Twelfth street, now built over, and the exact 
spot is not definitely known. 

After the death of Joseph Shannon in 1842 Mrs. Shan- 
non was married to James Johnston, of near Perkinsville, 
where Thomas lived up to 1862, when he enlisted in Com- 



2o8 THE I'lONEERS OF 

pany D, One Hundred and First Indiana Regiment, and 
served till the close of the war. On October 17, 1866, he 
was married to Aletha Shelley, of New Castle, Indiana. 
In 1870 he moved to his farm, three miles west of Ander- 
son. In 1872 he moved back to Anderson, No. 107 Fifth 
street, where he now (1895) resides. 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Shannon have three children, 
as follows: Benjamin, Richard and Thomas. Mr. S. the 
past several years has traveled extensively for a wholesale 
grocery house, and is a tine salesman, extensively known, 
and a fine conversationalist. He is a member of the G. 
A. R. Post at Anderson. He was born where the jail now 
stands, July 29, 1838. A member of the Travelers' Asso- 
ciation. 

JOSHUA CHAPPELL. 

Mr. S. is not, strictly speaking, a pioneer of Madison 
county, Indiana, but came in i860, and settled two miles 
west of Anderson, where he died April 22, 1871. His wife, 
formerly Sarah Carter, died March 23, 1873. Mr. and 
Mrs. Chappell were born in Yadkin county, North Caro- 
lina, about the years 1806 and 1808; married in North 
Carolina, October 17, 1827. Came to Henry county, 
Indiana, in 1850, where thirteen of the children were born, 
one being born in North Carolina before they came to 
Indiana. 

Mr. Chappell was a very popular man in Henry count}^ 
where his best days were spent. He was elected Sherift' 
of the county in 1844, and served four years, to the entire 
satisfaction of all. Elected as a Democrat. There were 
seven boys and seven girls ; all dead but three girls and 
two boys, Charles D. and Clem L. The boys reside in 
Anderson. Clem L. was born in Henry county, Novem- 
ber, 1842 ; married to Julia Hazelbaker, May 28, 1868 ; one 
child (Alice) born to them, August 26, 1869. Of the three 
girls living are Mrs. Dr. Sullivan, of Iowa, Mrs. Cai'ter, 



MADISON AND HAxNCOCK COUNTIES. 2O9 

of Lagrange, Indiana, and Mrs. Goodlander, of Muncie, 
Indiana. 

MOSES D. HARMON. 

In 1874 I ^^^^ ™^^ ^^^'' Harmon, who was then teach- 
ing school in the slashes of Duck-Creek township, Madi- 
son county, Indiana. Mr. H. has taught successfully in 
Madison, Grant and Tipton counties for a score of years. 
He was born in Tipton county, Indiana, just west of the 
city of Elwood, then Qiiincy, on September 5, 1848, a 
grand time, and place, just as gold was discovered in Cali- 
fornia and the epoch of the gas belt of 1887. He is a son 
of the late William P. Harmon and Mary (Leeson) Har- 
mon, early settlers of Tipton county, Indiana, and who 
were born in North Carolina, in 1806. 

Moses D. Harmon was married to Inez Clendenen, 
daughter of Huston and Elizabeth (Thompson) Clen- 
denen formerly of Elwood. Mr. H. attended the common 
schools of the county and attended Butler University at 
Indianapolis, where he further prepared himself for 
teaching. He is a member of Qiiincy Lodge, I. O. O. F., 
No. 200. He has served in all the school offices of 
Elwood, and was elected Trustee of Duck Creek for two 
years. He was elected County Recorder of Madison 
county November 6, 1894. Mr. H. is a splendid gentle- 
man, belongs to the Christian Church, and is a staunch 
Republican. Long may he live to record the interests of 
Madison county, Indiana. He resides in the city of 
Anderson. See his portrait on another page of this work. 

SANFORD M. KELTNER. 

Mr. Keltner I am glad to notice in my work, a prince 
of tip top fellows, who has been identified with the public 
schools of Anderson for the past ten years. He received a 
good education that has well fitted him for the law and 
school matters. He has taught school in many parts of 
Indiana, and was at one time clerk in a general store in 



210 THK PIONEERS OF 

Terre Haute, Indiana. In 1880 he came to Anderson, 
where he now (1895) resides. He studied law in the office 
of Robinson & Lovett, and was at one time associated with 
that firm, previous to Mr. Robinson's death, in 1891. He 
is a member of the K. of P. He was married to Alice 
Cakefair, who was born in Fayette count}-, Indiana. Two 
children were born to them, Ruth and May. Mr. K.'s 
father's name is Joseph C. Keltner, born in Ohio in 1817. 
Mr. Sanford Keltner was brought up under many 
disadvantages, and has all his life relied on his own exer- 
tions, and has succeeded admirably. Is a Republican of 
the first water. He is a safe attorne}^ and has his cases 
well in hand before going into open court. He resides on 
the north-east corner of School and Thirteenth streets, 
Anderson. A polished gentleman at home, at school or at 
the bar. Long may he be thus. 

WILLIAM BARTON. 

Mr. Barton was born in Franklin county, Virginia, 
June 10, 1826. At the age of five years he came with 
his parents to Middletown, Henry county, Indiana. 
Here he went to school and attained a fair business 
education and learned the wagon-maker trade, which he 
carried on in Middletown until 1850, when he moved to 
Qiiincy, now Elwood, Indiana. He was first married to 
Malissa Bristol, who was born near Middletown, Indiana, 
in 1830 ; daughter of Benjamin Bristol. She was the 
mother of three children: Eliza J. Moore, of Anderson ; 
Mary C. Kelly, of Alexandria, and Charles. She died in 
1856 and was buried at the Showalter cemeter3'. William 
Barton was'the second time married to Sinia J. Harmon 
in 1857. She was born in Wayne county, Indiana, in 
1837. She diedin Elwood in 1869. She was the daugh- 
ter of William P. and Mary (Leeson) Harmon. 

The following are the names of the children of this 
family, all born in Elwood, Indiana: James M. Barton, 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 211 

born October 29, 1859; married to Anna R. Ewing, April 
12, 1886. She was born in Ohio December 17, 1858, 
daughter of Ebenezer and EHzabeth (Dennis) Ewing, of 
Anderson. He has a fine business education, and has 
filled many important places in several county offices, as 
well as in banks at Elwood and Alexandria. He is a tip- 
top gentleman and a Democrat, and has resided in 
Anderson for the past ten years. He is a fine penman 
and book-keeper. Emma, a twin of J. M,, was born 
October 29, 1859. She died October 22, 1880 ; buried at 
Elwood, Indiana. Laura A., married to Isaac T, Boyden ; 
reside in Elwood, Indiana. Minnie J., married to John 
R. Grant; reside in Elwood. Bertha M., married to 
George Washburn; reside in Logansport, Indiana. 
Lasina F., married to Emery Orbough ; live in Elwood. 
Maud M., married to Otto Ford. Josephus died in in- 
fancy. 

All through life William Barton was an active, 
industrious man, and for years after moving to Elwood 
was engaged in business and operated the firstware house 
there, now known as the Harting warehouse. He had 
the first safe in Quincy, now Elwood, and at his death had 
$20,000 in cash in it. Mr. B. at one time was one of the 
wealthy men of the count}^, and no man living or dead 
caa say he ever wrongfully took five cents from any one. 
He was a Democrat of the Tacksonian school and in faith 
a Universalist. I first met Mr. Barton in Elwood in 1874, 
when he bought one of my first books, and it is with great 
pleasure that I write of him and his family. I am indebted 
to James M. Barton for many of the above dates. This 
family will long be remembered as one of the highest 
respectability and worth. Long may their memory live. 
Mr. James Barton and Mr. and Mrs. Ewing reside in 
Anderson, Indiana. Mr. E. was for many years one of 
the business men of this city, but of late lives a retired 
life. 



212 THE PIONEERS OF 

THE MAKEPEACE FAMILY. 

The name of Makepeace is identified with the earHest 
histor}' of Madison county. The first Makepeace came to 
this country from England in 1637, ^^^ settled in South 
Boston, Massachusetts. Amasa, Sr., with his family, was 
the first of the family to move to the far west. He came 
to Ohio in 1820, and lived two years with all of his family 
except his two eldest sons, Allen and Alfred. They pushed 
on to Madison county, Indiana, that year, and their father 
and the balance of the family removed to Chesterfield, 
Madison county, (then a dense wilderness) in 1822, and 
lived there till his death, February 28, 1848, aged seventy- 
one years. He was postmaster of the village for over 
twenty-five years. He married Betsy Babbitt, May 18, 
1800, in Norton, Massachusetts. She lived to the age of 
seventy-five, and died, June 18, 1858. Their children 
were Elizabeth, Allen, Alfred, Ransom, Julia, Hayden, 
George, Bradley, Laura, Harriet and Amasa. Elizabeth, 
born June 26, 1801 ; died about 1865. Allen, born Sep- 
tember 28, 1802 ; married Nancy Shimer. Their children 
were Allen, Quincy and Elvira Jane, who married John E. 
Corwin, and lives in Middletown, New York. 

Allen and Alfred were the first in the county. They 
peddled articles suited to the Indians for aw^hile, and then 
started a store at Chesterfield, where Allen died about 
July 10, 1870. At his death he was the wealthiest man in 
the county, worth about $300,000. He was respected by 
all who knew him. His wife died several years later. 

Alfred Makepeace, born in Norton, Massachusetts, 
November 3, 1804, settled in the Indian village (now the 
city of Anderson) in 1823, and lived there until his death, 
1876, except about two years, 1833 and 1834. ^^^ ^^ ^^^^ 
children, except Alonzo and Horace, were born in Ander- 
son, and they were born at Pendleton, near the falls of 
Fall Creek. Alfred married Hannah Irish on a farm, 
about two and a half miles east of Anderson. She was 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 213 

born in 1810 and died in 1857, loved by all who knew her. 
Alfred was a merchant, farmer and miller, and at one time 
was the second wealthiest man in the county. He owned 
quite a number of farms, residences and business in and 
around Anderson, and if gas had been struck at Anderson 
forty 3'ears ago his wealth w^ould have been far ahead of 
any one in the county, for he owned the Hickey farm. 
(The writer picked brush and helped clear the land where 
the first gas was struck, and the farm is now a part of 
Anderson, and Mickey is wealthy from the purchase of 
that farm trom him.) He also owned the seventy-two feet, 
south-east corner of the public square ; also the north-east 
corner, clear down past the Major Doxey residence, in 
1859. ^^ married Mrs. Elizabeth Clawson, near New 
Castle, Indiana. She still lives in Logan, Kansas. With 
the breaking out of the war in 1861 he met some reverses, 
but at his death, in 1875, he still had considerable property 
left, and in 1876 his nine children met in Anderson for the 
first time in sixteen years, and divided the property with- 
out trouble or litigation. Had all held to what they got 
until now they would have done well, for it all increased 
in value after gas was struck in 1887. The children of 
Alfred were Allen L., Alonzo I., Horace B., Laura M., 
Ardelia A., Letitia A., Samuel D., Esta A., Charles M. 
and Carey L. 

Allen L., born in Anderson in 1827 ; died in 1891 ; 
lived in the county all his life ; married twice ; first wife was 
Mary J., daughter of William Sparks, and had by that 
marriage several childfen, living in different places. Two 
of the sons. Will and Charles, live at the present time in 
Chicago. Both are printers. The writer does not know 
the name of his second wife, by whom he also had several 
children. He was an Odd Fellow. 

Alonzo L was born at Pendleton in 1833 : has lived in 
Anderson ever since except while in the army. He is in 
the hardware business at the present time, and is in good 



2 14 THE PIONEERS OF 

financial circumstances. He married Margaret Robinson, 
sister of the late Col. M. S. Robinson, in 1868. The}^ 
have two children, Frank and Hallie. Both married and 
live in Anderson. Hallie married Thomas Stillwell, Jr., 
son of the late lamented Thomas Stillwell, well loved and 
respected by all who knew him. They have one child, a 
little daughter. Alonzo enlisted as Second Lieutenant in 
Company A, Nineteenth Indiana, in 1861, and was in 
several hard fought battles in the Department of the Poto- 
mac. He was promoted to Captain of the company. He 
was captured in the first day's fight at Gettysburg. His 
company, regiment and brigade (Iron Brigade) were almost 
annihilated. His company went into the fight with about 
forty men, and there were but seven for roll call the next 
morning. The rest were killed, wounded or taken prison- 
ers. He was taken to Libby Prison, and helped do the 
tunneling so much spoken of, in which General A. D. 
Streight had charge. He was a prisoner for twenty months 
in Libby, Columbia and Charleston. When captured he 
weighed about one hundred and seventy-five pounds ; when 
exchanged he weighed about one hundred and twenty. 
After coming home he went into the hardware business, 
and is still in it. He was elected Sheriff of Madison county 
in 1886 on the Republican ticket by over three hundred 
and fifty majority. The county was then seven hundred 
to nine hundred Democratic. He is still in good health, 
and expects to live to a good, ripe old age. He belongs 
to the Odd Fellows and G. A. R. 

Horace B. was born in 1834, *near the falls of Fall 
Creek at Pendleton ; went with his father to Anderson in 
1835, '^^''^ spent his boyhood days there. He married Lou 
C. Gregory, of Pendleton, in 1858. They resided in Pen- 
dleton nearly two years, and then moved to Anderson. 
He was in the retail dry goods business at the north-east 
corner of court-house square at the breaking out of the 
rebellion in i86t. He assisted in raising Company A of 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 2l5 

the Nineteenth Indiana, of which his brother Alonzo went 
out as Second Lieutenant, and Major Charles T. Doxey 
was Orderly Sergeant, as well as many other gallant 
Anderson boys. In August and September, 1861, that 
gallant, brave, generous and loyal citizen, Thomas N. 
Still well, sacrificed his banking business to organize the 
Thirty-fourth Indiana (Morton Rifles). It was organized 
in camp at Anderson, and did gallant service during the 
war, and was in the last battle for the Union at Palmetto 
Ranch, Texas, in 1865. Horace enlisted as one of the 
leaders of the band. Second Lieutenant, and was with 
the regiment until mustered out by order from Congress, 
mustering out regimental bands, September, 1862. After 
being home for awhile he re-enlisted as Second Lieutenant 
in Company C, One Hundred and Tenth Indiana, and 
remained with the regiment until it was mustered out. 
H. B., like a great many other young men, made a great 
sacrifice in going into the army ; gave up a good business 
and left a pleasant home for the tented field to help save 
the Union and flag. In 1865 he moved to Indianapolis, 
and was connected with the wholesale trade on Meridian 
street for about twenty-eight years, fifteen of which was as 
a commercial traveler. At the election in November, 1894, 
he was elected Township Trustee for Center township, 
Marion county, Indiana, for four years, on the Republican 
ticket, by 1,923 majority. His predecessor was elected 
four 3'ears before by i ,923 majority on the Democratic 
ticket. Horace belongs to quite a number of secret organ- 
izations, some of which are the C. T. A., G. A. R., K. of 
P., N. U., J. O. A. M. and P. O. S. of A. He cast his 
first vote in 1856 as a Republican, and he is still of the 
same faith. 

Lura M. was born in Anderson in 1835, ^^^^ spent her 
girlhood there. She was married in 1856 to Will H. Mays, 
and now lives in Los Angeles, California. They have 
three children livinof and two dead. Her husband was in 



2l6 THE PIONEERS OF 

the Thirty-fourth and One Hundred and Thirtieth Indiana 
Regiments. 

Ardelia A. was born in Anderson about 1837 oi" 1838. 
She. married William Bennett, and now lives near that 
city. They have three children. 

Lutiiia A. was born in Anderson in 1840. She was 
married to Elder Emery Clifford. Reside in Anderson. 

Samuel D. was born in Anderson about 1843, and lived 
there until he enlisted in the Thirty-fourth Indiana Regi- 
ment in 1861 ; mustered out in 1866. He married a few 
years later, and now lives in Westfield, Illinois, and is 
publishing a Republican newspaper in Ashmore, Illinois. 
They have several children. He is an a i band teacher. 

Esta A. was born in Anderson about 1847 or 1848. 
At the breaking out of the war he went with his brother 
Lou in the Nineteenth Indiana for over a year. When he 
came home he enlisted in the One Hundred and Thirtieth 
Indiana, and served long and faithful. He married a few 
years later to Mrs. Sophia Goodwin. They have lived in 
Butler county, Kansas, several years. He is at present 
Clerk of the courts of Butler county, and lives in Eldorada. 
He was also a Justice of the Peace for a number of years. 
Elected to the offices by the Republicans. They have 
several children. 

Charles M. was also born in Anderson about the year 
185 1 or 1852. For the past twent}^ years he has been in 
almost every State in the West, and is at the present time 
in Kingfisher, Oklahoma. He never married. He had an 
interest in some Colorado gold mines at one time. He is 
now in the real estate business. He is a fine musician, and 
an a I band teacher. He has probably taught more bands in 
the West than any other teacher. He was leader of the 
celebrated Cow-Boy Band of Earned, Kansas, that went 
to Washington City when Harrison was inaugurated as 
President 1888. 

Ransom, the third son of Amasa Makepeace, was 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 21^ 

born in Norton, Massachusetts, in 1806, and emigrated to 
the county in 1822, and died in Delaware county, Indiana, 
in 1843. lie married Sarah McChmahan. She is still 
living in Daleville, Indiana, aged eighty-four years. They 
had three children. Alvin lives in Indianapolis. Lucinda 
lives in Kansas. Oliver died in Iowa, in 1848. 

Julia, the fourth child of Amasa, was born in 1808, 
and died in 1812. 

Hayden, the fifth child of Amasa, was born in 181 1, 
and died in 1843. He left one son, Willard, who died a 
few 3'ears ago, leaving two children, Cora and Sherman. 
Sherman is at present Justice of the Peace at Chesterfield, 
Indiana, and owns the old homestead of his great grand- 
father, Amasa. 

George, the seventh child of Amasa, was born in 18 13. 
He married Margaret McClanahan, and always lived in 
Chesterfield, after coming from the East in 1822. He died 
several years ago, and his wife died in 1894. They had 
six children, most of them now living. He followed mer- 
chandizing with his brother Allen in Chesterfield for a 
great many years. 

Bradley, the eighth child of Amasa, was born in 1815, 
and lived in Chesterfield until 1875, when he moved to 
Anderson, where he died a few years ago. He married 
Rachel Dilts. She is still living in Anderson. The}^ had 
no children. 

Laura, the ninth child of Amasa, was born in 1818, 
and died in 185 1 in Chesterfield. She married Simeon 
Landry. They had several children. Some are living in 
Anderson at the present time. 

Harriet, the tenth child of Amasa, was born in 1824, 
and died in 1827. 

Amasa, Jr., the eleventh child of Amasa, was born in 
1827 in Chesterfield, and always lived on the old home- 
stead. He died in 1877. Never married. 



2l8 THE PIONEERS OF 

The above was written by H. B. Makepeace, of 

Indianapolis. 

JOSEPH JOHNSON. 

Mr. J. was born in Randolph county, Indiana, June 
16, 1842. He was married to Elizabeth Allen, who was 
born in Hancock county, Indiana, in 1832. They married 
in 1862. Mr. J., though not a pioneer of Madison county, 
came to the north part of the county, where he settled in 
VanBuren township, which was new and undeveloped. 
He came there in 1869 and commenced to make a fine 
farm, and if you was to see it to-day (1895) you would not 
wonder when I say he succeeded. He owns nearly two 
hundred and fifty acres of choice land, three miles east of 
Summitville, and in 1892 he built a fine brick dwelling, 
which is among the best in the count3^ He has his large 
farm in a state of fine cultivation. A grand, good farmer, 
and one of the substantial men of Madison county. He 
is a Democrat of the olden times and a member of the 
Baptist Church, as well as his wife, who is a lady and 
worthy to be mistress of so good a home. 

Children's names : Manson U., born September 16, 
1864 ; Superintendent of the schools of Madison county. 
The oldest daughter married Mr. Beeson. Jesse married 
to A. B. Sanders. Daniel M., William, Etta, married to 
Ezra Webster; Amanda, John R. and Delia A. 

JOHN TITUS, 

One. of the young and progressive farmers of Madison 
county, I wish to remember in the Pioneer, son of the 
late Samuel and Eliza (Seward) Titus. John was born 
near Markleviile, Indiana, in a splendid time, about the 
middle of the nineteenth century (1850), and was raised on 
a farm, and that has been and yet is his avocation. He 
resides one-half mile south of Markleviile, on the Knights- 
town pike, where he owns a splendid farm (formerly the 
William Sloan farm), where he has just completed one of 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 219 

the best dwellings in the county ; finely situated and the 
surroundings are good ; in sight of three churches, two 
school-houses and near the railroad, and everything that 
goes to make a desirable home. He was married to Lizzie 
Midkiff. John's father, Samuel Titus, was born in New 
Jersey, 1814, who was married to Eliza Seward in 1842. 
She was born near Cincinnati in 1824. She died January 
15, 1870. Mr. T. died June 9, 1886; both buried at the 
Collier cemetery, near their old home. Brothers and 
sisters of John Titus: Jane Little, Charity Ham, Anna 
Dairow, Ruth McCarty, Adelade Ham, Lizzie Titus, Clara 
Titus, Riley Titus, and Dr. Charles Titus, of Warrington, 
Indiana. 

ALLEN BOORAM. 

My friend Booram I have known from his boyhood 
days. He was born about the year 1850, just south of 
Markleville, Indiana, son of the late John Booram, who 
was born in Virginia in 1817 ; died in 1884; buried at the 
Collier cemetery. He was married to Margaret Hedrick 
in 1839. She is yet (1895) living. Allen received a good 
education and taught school several years. About 1872 he 
was married to Jennie Kirk, who was born about the year 
1852 in Pennsylvania. He was elected County Commis- 
sioner November, 1894, over Eli Hodson. He was the 
first Republican to fill this office for years, and is to-day 
(1895) serving to the entire satisfaction of the people who 
elected him. A man of fine business qualities, that 
eminently fit him for so important a place. He has a fine 
farm south-west of Markleville, and ten acres just south of 
Markleville, where he has a delightful home on the pike 
and near the railroad, which is in sight of three churches, 
two school-houses and many other conveniences that make 
his home desirable. In his make-up he is retired, not 
seeking notoriety, and when elected it was a clear case of 
the office seeking the man. In religious notions he is a 



220 THE PIONEERS OF 

free thinker. A Mason of high standing, as was his father 
before him. 

His grandfather, Jacob Booram, was born in Virginia 
in 1781, and died near Markleville in 1856. Mrs. Jacob 
Booram died near Markleville, aged ninety-five years ; 
both buried in the Collier cemetery. Glad to give Allen a 
notice in the Pioneer. 

THE BRONENBERG FAMILY. 

To write the pioneer life of Madison county, Indiana, 
without mention of the above family would be like 
visiting Massachusetts and not seeing Boston. The elder, 
Frederick Bronenberg, came when a young man from 
Germany to Ohio with his wife, both of whom were born 
there about the year 1784. Mr. and Mrs. B. remained a 
few years in Ohio, where three or four of the older chil- 
dren were born. About the year 1819 or 1820 they started 
to move to Illinois and got as far as Madison county, 
where Chesterfield now is, or in that locality, perhaps near 
the " Mounds." Here one of the children was taken sick 
and died, and they decided to go no farther west. A 
piece of land was entered and the family remained there 
till it has become numerous, both in Madison and 
Delaware counties, and to-day (1895) the family down to 
the fifth generation own thousands of acres of land. The 
family has all those years been among the foremost in the 
county. The elder Bronenberg was a tanner and started 
the first tanyards in the county, which he operated near 
Chesterfield for years, up to perhaps 1840. He died in 
1853. Mrs. B. died a few years previous ; buried on the 
Bronenberg farm in Union township, near the town of 
Chesterfield. This burial place is a private one and is 
known as the Bronenberg cemetery. 

The- following are the names of the children, part of 
whom were born in Madison county, Indiana : Frederick, 
Jr., born in Ohio about the year 1814 ; is living (1895). 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 221 

His wife, Hulda, died in Anderson in 1888 ; is buried in 
the Bronenberg cemetery. The following are the names 
of their children: William, died in the army in 1863. He 
was in the Sixty-ninth Indiana Volunteers. Ransom, 
married Miss Seward, daughter of Joseph I. Seward; re- 
side on the " Mounds " farm, the old home of Frederick, 
Jr. Tude, single, at home in Anderson. Cal., single, at 
home. This family is Republican, and, as the other 
members 'of "the family, are quite well off. John, the 
second child,' settled on the edge of Delaware county, 
Indiana, where he lived till his death about the year 1875. 
He raised a large family, who live in Madison and Dela- 
ware counties. Mrs. Carl Nelson, who lived many years 
in Madison county, was finally killed, it is said, by Manis, 
near Terre Haute about the year 1880. Jacob, lived many 
years in Richland township, four miles north-east of 
Anderson, where he owned four hundred acres of choice 
land. He moved to the city of Anderson about the year 
1882, where he died 'in 1891. His wife died in 1893. 
They are buried in the Anderson cemetery, where a fine 
granite monument marks their resting place. He was a 
Democrat, and served several years as County Commis- 
missioner. Among his children are Henry J., Samuel, 
Mrs. Thomas East, Mrs. Jackson and Sant. Henry 
owns one thousand acres of land just south of Chesterfield, 
and also served as County Commissioner for four years 
and twenty years as Trustee of Union township. He was 
married near Chesterfield to Miss Falkner ; both living 
(1895). He is known as a modern Spiritualist and has 
given liberally to the society. Michael, the first child of 
the family, was born in Madison county in 1821 ; resides 
in Richland township, where he owns a choice farm on 
Killbuck. Carl resides on the old homestead, where he 
lives in peace and plenty. He is also a Spiritualist, and 
has given largely of his means and land to the State 
spiritual camp ground, located on his farm just north of 




HON. CHARLES T. DOXEY, 
Ex-Member of Congress, Anderson, Indiana. 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 223 

Chesterfield. He is a liberal gentleman, tree thinker and 
a Democrat. He has been married twice. Of his chil- 
dren I know but little. One daughter married Mr. 
Cromer, who has a line farm and family and is a teacher 
of note. He was born in Delaware county, Indiana. The 
Bronenberg family was among the first to settle in the 
county and of the highest respectability. Am glad to give 
them this sketch in my book. 

THE IRISH FAMILY. 

James Irish came to Madison county, Indiana, in 1823, 
and first settled between Anderson and the "Mounds," 
on what was at^erwards known as the Kendall farm. The 
family remained here a few years, when they removed to 
Pendleton and located at the Falls. Here James Irish and 
Samuel D. Irish, his son, built and operated a woollen and 
grist mill for years, up to the death of Samuel D., which 
was in 1868. James Irish, after living in the county near 
fifty years, went to Texas, and died there about the year 
1861, aged seventy-six 3'ears. His wife died in Pendleton 
many yaars ago. Among the other children of Mr. and 
Mrs. James Irish were William and James. 

Among the more prominent of this large and early 
famil}^ was Samuel D., a grand, good man, who did so 
much for Pendleton and Madison county, where he lived 
nearly all his life, for he was quite young when his father 
came to the county, perhaps fourteen years of age. It is 
of him and family I wish mainly to write. He was all his 
life connected with mills, and at one time the best known 
of any man perhaps in the county, if we except Nin Berr3\ 
He was twice married. His first wife died many years 
ago. She was a splendid lady, and indeed a pioneer. 

The following are the names of the children born to 
Mr. and Mrs. Samuel D. Irish: Virgil, deceased; Mrs. 
John Snelson, deceased ; Volney B., lives in Anderson; 
James M. ; Oliver, deceased ; William, deceased ; Ira, lives 



224 "^^^ PIONEERS OF 

in Pendleton. Volney, James M., William and Oliver 
were in the war of 1861-5. Samuel D. Irish was married 
to Mrs. Reed about the year 1850. She and Mr. Irish are 
buried at the Pendleton cemetery, as well as other mem- 
bers of the family. 

Samuel D. Irish w- s at one time quite wealthy, and 
stood high among all classes of people. He was good to 
the poor new-comer, and his memory will live for time to 
come. He was an old-time Whig, then a Republican. 
He was all his active life a devoted Mason, and was made 
so at Indianapolis as early as 1840. He was a charter 
member of Madison Lodge, No. 44, at Pendleton, and 
for many years its presiding officer in the east, where the 
writer received the Sublime degree at his hands in 1857. 
He was a free thinker, and I think a Universalist in faith. 
No better family than that of the Irish, a pioneer family 
that is closely associated with the early history of Madison 
county. In person Mr. Irish was five feet eight inches in 
height, square built, dark complexion, and well informed, 
especially on Masonry, his delight. Several of his sons 
were fine musicians, and all well informed men. The 
three older sisters of Samuel D. Irish, daughters of James, 
were married to Alfred Makepeace, Garrett McAllister 
and James McClanahan, all deceased. 

I am sorry to give so poor a sketch of so good a fam- 
ily, but it is the best I can do under the circumstances. 

ULYSSES A. LEWIS. 

Al, or Pete, as we sometimes call him, is the eldest 
son of the late James M. Lewis, and grandson of the ven- 
erable Abisha Lewis, of Markleville, formerly of Rush 
county, Indiana. James M. Lewis was born March 5, 
1846, in Rush county. He was married to Eliza W. Gil- 
more, June 8, 1865. She is the daughter of William 
Gilmore, one of the pioneers of Adams township. She 
was born there November 26, 1845. James died in 1892. 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 225 

He was at his death one of the substantial men and traders 
of the count}'. 

' Al was born near Markleville, Indiana, in 1868. He 

married Miss Ford, daughter of Isaac and Mariah (Wil- 
Hams) Ford, about the year 1869. The}' reside near 
Markieville. Mr. Lewis is engaged in the live stock trade 
and farming, an active, rising young man, that I have 
known all his life. He is a line judge of stock, and a lover 
of fine horses, especially if they can "go." He, like his 
father, is a Republican of the stalwart kind, but not a 
member of any church. Mrs. Allie Lewis was born in 
Markleville about the year 1869 or 1870. Two or three 
children have been born to them, but their names I did not 
get. The following are the names of Mr. Lewis' brothers 
and sisters : Essie, Cora L., Ida M., Ross M., James E., 
Mabel D., George F. and Hazel M. Cora L. and Mabel 
D. are deceased. 

JAMES K. JOHNSON. 

Mr. J, came from Pennsylvania about the time of the 
gas discovery at Anderson, 1887, where he has since lived. 
The first two or three years he was engaged in gas fitting 
and plumbing, but of late has given his time and attention 
to sinking gas wells, and perhaps sunk more wells in Mad- 
ison and adjoining counties than any other man. In 1893 
he built a splendid residence on Walnut street, near Ohio 
avenue, and has one of the handsomest homes in the city. 
He is a clever gentleman, fairly well informed on all sub- 
jects, and can see as far in the ground as any one. Mr. 
J. was born about the year i860, and is just in his prime 
to-day (1895), just in time to engage in his chosen avoca- 
tion. He has an interesting family, but I am unable to give 
any of their names. We lived neighbors to them in 1888, 
on Pearl street, and am glad to give the family a short 
sketch in my work. 

13 



226 THE PIONEERS OF 

SAMUEL D. IRISH. 

Samuel D. Irish was born in Rensselaer county, 
State of New York, near Albany, the State capital, in * 
about the year 1806, living there until eight years of age, 
when, with his parents, he removed to Licking county, 
Ohio. 

In earl}^ manhood he learned the business of woolen 
manufacturing, carding, spinning, dyeing, cloth dressing, 
etc., in the town of Zanesville, Ohio; also flour milling. 
Later, in Licking county, Ohio, about the year 1830 or 
1831, he became interested, with his father, in the milling 
business at the falls of Fall Creek, near Pendleton, Madi- 
son county, Indiana. At this time was erected a large 
flouring mill at the Falls on the south side of the creek. 
This, at that time, was the center of the custom milling of 
the county. Later he built a saw mill and a building in 
which wool carding, dyeing and cloth-dressing was done. 
About this time he married a Miss Phillips, of the Welch 
Hills, near Granville, Licking county, Ohio. Of this wife 
two children were born, Virgil P. and Olive A. Mrs. Irish 
departed this life in 1834. ^^ ^he latter part of the 3/ear 
1836 the subject of this sketch was again married to Miss 
Jemima A. Baker, daughter of Aaron Baker, of Newark, 
Licking county, Ohio. Of this union there were born live 
children, viz: Volney B., Oliver E., William O., James 
M. and Ira A., of which Volney, James and Ira are still 
living. 

In 1839 Samuel D. Irish bought his father's interest in 
the Falls Mills and woolen factory and the mill tract, 
including one hundred and sixty acres of land. Being sole 
owner now, he run the business successfully until 1843, 
when he sold out to his brothers, William and James D. 
Irish, and purchased the mill property of Samuel Ireland, 
known as the Lower Mills, of Pendleton ; later known as 
" Our Mills," which were built in 1847. In 1850 he repur- 
chased the Falls Mills and tract, and built a large woolen 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 227 

factory on the site of the old carding-house, in which any 
and all kinds of woolen goods, including blankets, etc., 
were manufactured. These mills were run by members of 
his own family, some in one department and some in 
another, and managed ver}^ successfully by the father as 
superintendent of all departments. 

In January, 1854, Jemima A. Irish, the second wife, 
departed this life, leaving her husband and five children. 
In the latter part of the year 1854 ^^^ again married to Mrs. 
Eliza Reid, of Anderson, Indiana. There were no chil- 
dren by this union. 

Mr. Irish was ol a ver}' enterprising turn, and did a 
great deal toward developing Madison county, especially 
the southern portion. He was an enthusiastic railroad 
man, and was for all enterprises tending to the devel- 
opment of the whole country. In politics he was identified 
with the Whig party until the birth of the Republican 
party, to which he belonged until the day of his death, 
which occurred April 14, 1864. He was buried under the 
auspices of the Masonic order of Pendleton, of which he 
was Master for many years. He was also a prominent 
member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. Was 
not identified particularly with any church or creed. Gen- 
erous hearted, open handed, as many a poor soldier's 
family can testily. During the war, while husbands or the 
heads of families were at the front, many a barrel of flour 
has found its way to the needy without their knowing 
whose hand bestowed it. 

At the beginning of the war, in 1861, five sons volun- 
teered to assist in putting down the rebellion, leaving none 
at home but the youngest son, Ira A., and John Q; Reid, 
a step-son, to assist in managing the business. 

Death came before the war closed, and thus ended the 
life of one of the most prominent and best known men of 
Madison county. Buried at Pendleton, 



228 THE PIONEERS OF 

PHILLIP Hx\RDIN. 

Mr. H. was born in Pennsylvania about the 3^ear 1810. 
Came when a young man to Huntsville, Indiana, and car- 
ried on wagon-making for several years. He was married 
about the year 1833 to Mary Alfonte. The family resided 
in Huntsville many years. Mr. H. died at the age of 
sixty-nine years. Mrs. H. died twenty years later at the 
age of eighty-one years. Both buried at Huntsville. 

Children's names : Lou, born in 1834 ; married to Dr. 
Slack, of Yorktown, Indiana ; both dead. Kate, born in 
1836 ; married to Grand Clark in 1856 ; reside in Hancock 
county, four miles south of Pendleton. Maggie, married 
to B. F. Aimen ; reside in Pendleton. Ben was born in 
Pennsylvania ; served four years as Commissioner of Mad- 
ison county. Charles V., born in 1838 ; married to Miss 
Marsh ; reside in Fortville. He was in the Twelfth Indi- 
ana Volunteers in 1861-5, and served as postmaster at 
Fortville four years. John, married to Miss Kirk ; reside 
in Missouri. He was in the Second Indiana Battery three 
years in the war of 1861-5 ; born in 1840. Evaline, born 
in 1842 ; married to Mr. Hurst ; reside in Huntsville. A 
good family, and I am glad to give them a sketch in the 
Pioneer. Mr. H. was a brother of the late John Hardin. 

ABIJAH COX, 

Son of William Cox, was born in Ohio, December 4, 
1847, and was quite young when his parents came to Fall 
Creek, four miles west of Pendleton. Abijah was married 
to Ann McCarty, November 12, 1881. She is the daugh- 
ter of the late Patrick McCarty, who was born in Ireland 
about the year 1814. Mr. C. is a farmer, and resides on 
the old William Cox farm, formerly the Samuel Jackson 
farm, in Fall-Creek township. Abijah Cox is a brother of 
Tunis, William P., Martha F., Isaac W. (dead), Jasper N., 
Robert and Wesley T. William Cox, father of Abijah, 
was born in Ohio, October, 1821 ; married to Martha A. 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 229 

Preston in 1845. Mrs. Cox was born in Ohio in 1826. 
Came to Madison county in 1850. 

Glad to notice this family, one of the highest respecta- 
bility and worth. William Cox, Sr., was many years 
Commissioner of the county. Elected as a Democrat, to 
which party all the sons belong. Mrs. McCarty, mother 
of Mrs. Abijah Cox, is yet living (1895) on the old farm, 
three miles north-east of Pendleton. 

GARRETT McALLISTER, SR. 

Mr. M. was born in the State of Virginia in 1815. 
Came with his father, William McAllister, to Adams town- 
ship about the year 1830, south-west of Ovid. He was 
married to Mariah Irish about the year 1845. She is the 
daughter of James Irish, one of our early settlers of near 
Anderson ; afterwards at the falls of Fall Creek. She was 
born about the year 1817 ; died in 1889. Mr. McA. died, 
April, 1864. Both buried at the McAllister cemetery in 
Adams township. 

Mr. McAllister was one of the grand men of Madison 
county, of unsullied honesty and integrity, and a Mason of 
high standing. No man stood higher than Garrett McAl- 
lister. He was a brother of John and Thomas McAllister 
and nephew of John, Thomas and Garrett McAllister. He 
was a Democrat of the olden school. The two sons born 
to Mr. and Mrs. McAllister are : Burt, born in 1845 ; 
resides on Lick Creek, on the old Robert Wylie farm, in 
Adams township. Austin W. resides on the home place, 
formerl}^ the Saul Reger farm ; also on Lick Creek. A. W. 
was elected County Assessor in 1892, and fills his office to 
the entire satisfaction of the people. The father, Garrett, 
was a splendid farmer, and it is said he produced on his 
farm the largest yield of wheat ever raised in Adams 
township. It is with great pleasure I write of this family. 

DRS. JOHN AND WILLIAM A. HUNT. 

The Hunt family came from Wayne count}^, Indiana, 



230 THE PIONEERS OF 

to near Huntsville, Indiana, quite early in our histor}^ 
back, perhaps, in the thirties. The father and mother of 
the doctors were William and Elizabeth Hunt, who are 
buried at Huntsville. They came from North Carolina, 
and were born there. Dr. John Hunt was born, January, 
1817, and read medicine, and his life was mainly devoted 
to the practice. His best years, perhaps, were spent in 
Madison county, in Anderson and Lafayette township, 
where he resided several years. About the year i860 he 
moved to Spiceland, Henrv county, Indiana, and resided 
there several years, when he went to Springdale, Arkan- 
sas, where he died, July 23, 1894. ^^ ^^'^^ ^^'^^ married 
to Miss Bird, who died in 1855, and is buried at the Hunts- 
ville cemetery. One son, Benton, lived to the age of 
twenty-four years. He is also buried at Huntsville. Two 
or three other children were born to this marriage, but died 
young. He was the second time married to Hester McAl- 
lister, daughter of John McAllister, Sr., about the year 
1858. One child was born to them, Henry G., who, with 
his mother, lives in Arkansas. John Hunt was an active 
man, a fine doctor, and at one time Treasurer of Madison 
county ; also in the State Legislature. A polished gentle- 
man, well informed, of fine phj^sical make-up, light hair 
and complexion. He has a host of friends in Madison 
county, who will remember him as long as they live. He 
was a Democrat and a free thinker. 

William A. Hunt was born in 1822. He also studied 
medicine, and his best days and mind were given to it. A 
splendid doctor, of fine make-up and florid complexion ; 
also a Democrat, and perhaps the best posted man that 
ever lived in the county on geology. At his death he had 
a fine library and collection of specimens, now in the 
county collection, hid away in the high school building, a 
shame to his memor3^ His boyhood days were spent at 
Huntsville, and received a good education, and graduated 
in the medical schools of the countr3^ He taught school 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 23I 

in his younger life. At the age of twenty-live he was 
married to Sarah C. Wright, daughter of William Wright, 
who was also an early citizen of Huntsville. This was in 
1847. She was born in Milton, Indiana, August 9, 1827. 
She died in Anderson in 1888, and is buried there. Three 
children were born to them. Dr. M. Volney, married to 
Ada Andrews. She died, July 23, 1877. Dr. John W., 
married to Etta Brickly, daughter of Dr. W. P. Brickly, in 
1873. Both are tine physicians, and reside in Anderson, 
and have a tine practice. The third son, William A., died 
in Anderson, October 7, 1877, at the age of twenty-six 
years, and is buried at Anderson. 

Dr. William A. Hunt was a member and father of the 
Madison County Historical Society, and all his life, after 
its organization, was its honored president; a Democrat, 
and member of the Masonic order. He loved its noble 
teachings. He was a w^ell read man, and had his mind 
stored full of useful knowledge. He died in 1890. Drs. 
John and William A. Hunt will be remembered by the early 
citizens of Madison county, where they lived and practiced 
medicine so long. 

THE MYERS FAMILY. 

Samuel Myers was born in South Carolina on 
November 12, 181 2, but when quite young went with his 
parents to Clinton county, Ohio. Here he was first mar- 
ried to Rebecca Cather in 1835. Miss Cather was born 
February 18, 1816. Two children were born here in 
Ohio: Jasper C. and William R. In 1839 the young 
family came west and settled in Madison county, four 
miles west of the village of Anderson, on White River. 
Soon after coming here Mrs. Myers died, May 10, 1839. 
Jasper C. was born in Ohio in 1836. He now resides in 
California (Bakersfield). He was married late in life to 
Mattie Cather, daughter of Robert Cather, an early 
settler of Madison count}'. William R. was born in 1838. 
He received a good education ; taught school ; served as 



232 THE PIONEERS OF 

County Surveyor ; elected Secretary of State three times ; 
elected to Congress and served two years with ability ; 
elected as a Democrat ; a brilliant speaker, of high social 
standing. He was married to Mary F. Mershon in i860. 
She was born in Pendleton and is the daughter of Judge 
W. H. Mershon, an early and prominent citizen of Madi- 
son county. Second time married to a lady in Indianap- 
olis in 1894. 

Captain William R. Myers was in the late war of 
1861 and 1865, and served long and well in the Eighth 
Indiana Volunteers, Company K, and afterwards in the 
Forty-seventh Indiana Volunteers, Company G, serving 
as Lieutenant and Captain. In 1865 he was discharged 
and returned home. He read law and was admitted to 
the bar at Anderson in 1866. His wife, a grand, good 
woman, died in 1892 ; is buried at the Anderson ceme- 
tery, where a suitable monument marks her resting-place. 
Mr. Myers was elected Secretary of State and to 
Congress as a Democrat, to which party he is fondly 
attached; resides in Indianapolis. 

After the death of Mrs. Samuel Myers in 1839 ^^ 
was, in the year 1840, again married to Elizabeth Cather, 
to whom the following children were born: Theresa C, 
Mary R., Clara S. and George H. He was married to 
Miss Boxley, of Hamilton county, Indiana, about the 
year 1880; reside four miles west of Anderson, Indiana. 
Oliver C. was married to Miss Wagg}-, daughter of 
Henry Waggy, an early citizen of Madison count}^ ; 
reside in North Indianapolis. Martha S., Frank, Endora 
K. and Jesse F., who was married to Professor W. M. 
Croan (son of the Hon. David E. Croan), a fine educator 
and -late professor of Shenandoah College, Iowa. 

The deceased members of Samuel Myers' family are : 
Theresa C, Mary R., Clara S. and Endora K. One of 
the girls married Dr. Adamson, one Captain Hiram Van- 
devender and one Hon. B3a-on H. Dyson. 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 233 

When Samuel Myers first came to Madison county 
he was a poor man, and through his boyhood days, being 
left an orphan, he had a trying time, but success came at 
last through toil and patience. He lived many years on 
his tine farm of two hundred acres just east of the city of 
Anderson, but for the last ten years he has resided in 
Anderson, where he died in 1894 ; is buried at the Ander- 
son cemetery. During his residence in Madison county 
he was called on to fill many places of trust and 
importance, and for nearly fifteen years served as Trustee 
of Anderson township. He was an old-time Whig and 
later a Republican. In all the relations of life Mr. Myers 
was true to the trust confided so long in him. He will be 
remembered as one of Madison county's oldest and best 
men. His second wife preceded him to the life beyond in 
1892 or 1893. 

THE McAllister family. 

This large and influential family came to the Lick 
Creek settlement in Madison county about the year 1828 
or 1830. There were four brothers and three sisters, all of 
whom raised large families and are scattered over a vast 
territory. The paternal grandfather was born in Virginia 
about the year 1765. His name was Garrett McAllister, 
the front part of which has been pretty well kept up. He 
was married in 1787 to Miss Craig. Soon after they 
went to Kentucky to reside, but she soon died and is 
buried there. He went back to Virginia and was the 
second time married to Miss Sprowel, to whom were born 
five children. The first two, James and William, were 
born of the first marriage. James, the first, born in 1789, 
never came to Madison county, but died many years ago 
in Virginia. He was married to Miss Frazier. She is 
also dead and is buried in Virginia. 

William, born 1792, was married to Belena Frazier. 
She died in Madison county about the year 1854, ^^^ 



234 ^^^^ PIONEERS OI^ 

died in 1862 or 1863 ; both buried near New Columbus, 
Following are the names of the children by his first wife. 
His second wife was Mrs. Mary Tibets. Gairett, born in 
1816; married to Mariah Irish. He died in 1864, she in 
1889 ; buried at the McAllister cemetery. John died in 
Nebraska in 1892. Thomas lives in Missouri. Mrs. 
Duke Scott also lives in Missouri. Mr. Scott died in 1894 
in Missouri. John served as County Commissioner for 
several years in Madison county. 

Thomas McAllister, born 1794, third son of Garrett; 
married to Margaret McGrady. She died in 1891. He 
died in 1853 ; both bvn-ied at the McAllister cemetery. 
Children's rames: James G., John W., Annie E., Martin 
v., Mary H., Robert, Clifton and Charles. The last three 
were in the war of 1861 and 1865. John W. was Sheriff 
of Madison county in 1874 at the time of his death. 
Annie E. and Charles are also dead, as well as James G. 
Thomas McAllister was a very prominent man. He served 
in the Indiana Legislature many years and was a member 
of the State Senate at the time of his death. 

John, fourth child, born in 1795 ; was married to 
Hester McGrady. She died in 1885. He died in 1858. 
He served as County Commissioner many years ; both 
buried at Anderson. Children's names: Elizabeth A., 
married to Silas Busby. May M., married to Dr. Joseph 
Pugh. She died about the year 1849, he in 1895. Ma- 
linda, married to James Jackson ; reside in Arkansas. 
Thomas W., lives in California. Francis, married to Jesse 
Read ; both dead ; buried in Henry county, Indiana. 
James M. (the only Jim) was married to Hester Free in 
1856; reside in Anderson, Indiana. His children's names 
are: Robert, Thomas, Cad, Hester and Dal, the last two 
deceased. James was born in 1834 ^^ Lick Creek, Madi- 
son county, Indiana. Hester Foster died in 1894. Dal 
died in 1892, aged twenty; both buried in the Anderson 
cemetery. Hester, married to Dr. John Hunt ; reside in 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 235 

Arkansas. He died there in 1893. John G., deceased. 
Augustus S., died in Memphis, Tennessee. 

Fifth child, Garrett, born 1799; was married to Eliz- 
abeth McGrady. He died in 1854, she in 1856 ; buried near 
New Columbus. Children's names: America, dead; 
James G., Susan, Mary M. , John C, Lorenzo D., Corydon, 
William and Emazetta. Susan, John C. and America are 
deceased. 

The sixth child, Susan, born in 1797 ; married to Mar- 
tin Brown. He died in 1856. She is also dead (time not 
known). Children's names: Mary A., Lorenzo D., 
Susan, Harriet, Emily, Elizabeth, Martin, Louiza and 
Garrett W. 

The seventh child, Anna, born in 1709; married to 
John Jones. He died about the year 1850. She died about 
the year 1870, aged eighty-five years. Children's names : 
Harriet (dead), Jonathan, Morris (dead), Abijah, Davis, 
Ann, Mary and Paul and John, twins. 

The eighth child, Mary, born in 1801 ; married to 
Robert Wylie. Both died in Missouri at an advanced age. 
Children's names, of whom four were in the late war of 
1861-5 : Jane A., Mary, Thomas, Andrew, Rankin, 
Harry and Madison. 

The McAllister family in the main are, or was, Dem- 
ocrats and Universalists. A grand famil}^ of high social 
standing, and I am glad to write of them as one of the 
pioneer families of Madison county. 

Among the more prominent of the McAllister families 
have been Thomas and John, sons of William, the former 
Judge of the court in Missuri, and the latter Commissioner 
of Madison county for years; John W., son of Thomas, 
was Sheriff of Madison county several years; Lorenzo D., 
son of Garrett, was Captain of Company K, Eighth Indi- 
ana Volunteers, daring the war of 1861-5 ; Augustus C, 
son of John, was for several years a successful attorney at 
the Anderson bar. He died just in his prime in Memphis, 



236 THE PIONEERS OF 

Tennessee, about the year 1881. Austin W., son of Gar- 
rett, Jr., has been County Assessor for several 3'ears ; born 
in 1855. Those in the army were Lorenzo D., Robert, 
Clifton and Charles. Dr. Martin Brown, a well-known 
doctor in Madison county, lives in Summitville ; Garrett 
W., formerly a dmggist in Anderson (deceased) ; Ward 
Roach, an attorney at Franklin, Indiana. 



EARLY RECOLLECTIONS OF PENDLETON. 

Mr. Harden — Sir : My father had come to Pendleton 
in 1824, but did not bring his family there until June, 1830. He 
met us, mother and four children, of which I was the eldest. 
We came by public conveyance from our home in old Virginia 
to Boonsboro, West Virginia, where father met us with a tv/o- 
horse carriage. We came from New Castle to old Uncle Billy 
Williams' (father of Mrs. Lucinda Hardin), and there we had 
to stop until father came down to town and had the windows put 
in our house and the door hung, when he came after us. As 
we drove up the hill he said here is Pendleton. 1 looked to see 
the town, and where the Universalist Church stands now was 
a large double log cabin, owned and occupied by Major 
McCartney, son-in-law of old Mr, Pendleton, for whom the 
town was named. On the east side of the street was another 
log cabin, in one end of which a school was taught by Alfred 
Kilgore, brother of Judge David Kilgore. On the west side of 
the street, where George Cole's home is now, was a small log 
house, used and owned by a man named Arch Joyce, in which 
he kept a grocery, with some whisky, which was generally 
well patronized every Saturday afternoon, and generally ended 
in a fight, and the next house was ours. It sit back in the yard, 
as is to-day the house owned b3' Mrs. Mary Lukens, then the 
brick store, which was built and owned by my father, and on 
the east corner, across the street, was a stable, in which father 
kept his horse, the same now where the hotel stands, and on 
the south-east corner, now owned and occupied by Mrs. Lu 
Silver Taylor, was the logs to build a hewn log house for old 
Mr. Pendleton. It was all the church there for three years. 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 237 

We had no drinking water in the place except what was 
brought either from what was called the " Spout Spring," out 
on what is now, I think, owned by the heirs of Joel Clark, and 
occupied by Newt Armstrong, or across the creek, from a 
spring on the farm owned at that time by Aaron Shaul, now 
by Mrs, Josephine Stephenson. There was no church in the 
place, but services were held in the room where school was 
taught, until Grandpa Pendleton's log house was built, and 
after that it was used for that purpose until the first church was 
built, just where the present one now stands, and the first was 
round logs, just a cabin. There was not a fence of any kind 
in the place, and no sidewalks. 

Soon after we had moved there the citizens began to talk 
of a public well, the same that is now there on the corner, and 
a man named Adam Anderson was hired to dig it, and at the 
corner of the brick store of an evening they all sit around, and 
the hat would be passed to collect all that was given to pay the 
well digger the next day, and if there was not enough, Mr, 
Anderson would wait until the next evening, and the well was 
covered up. We had preaching once in four weeks by the 
regular circuit rider, as the same preacher had to preach at 
Anderson once in four weeks, but Uncle Frank Richmond and 
Stephen Masters, two local preachers, who lived on their farms 
a short distance west of town, preached for us, and we had 
Sabbath-school also. On the corner where the brick house of 
Mrs. Dr. Stephenson now is was a cabbage garden, owned by 
Jacob Mingle, who kept tavern in a one-story log cabin where 
David Clark now lives, and where James Smether's house now 
stands was a double log cabin, the home and drug store of Dr. 
Boardwell, son-in-law of Mr. Pendleton. 

The large double cabin where Major McCartney lived, on 
the lot where the Universalist Church is now, was used as the 
court-house, for the county seat was then in Pendleton, until 
1834, when it was moved to Anderson, at which place there 
was at that time no court-house either. Major McCartney's 
family being a large one, they had beds in both rooms, but they 
were taken down while court was in session. The county seat 
was moved to Anderson, as that was said to be more in the 
center of the county. Our home and Robert Leasure's were the 



238 THE PIONEERS OF 

only frame houses in the place. Our house, although but a 
story and a half, had a sleeping room up stairs, which was used 
for the hired girl and the children, but, small as it was, it often 
was used by Mrs. Mingle, the landlady across the street, for 
some of her boarders, as her house was a one-story log cabin. 
There was no house west of Dr. Board well's until we come to 
the Mill place, and there was an old cabin standing there, but 
in the bottom, across the creek, on the farm owned and occu- 
pied bv Elijah Williams, stood three or four log cabins, forming 
a distillery, owned and run by Charley Mitchell, in which 
whisky enough was made to keep Arch Joyce's barrel from 
getting empty. Saturday was the great day of the week. The 
town was full then, and generally ended in a fight between two 
families named Ricks and Ogg, who never met only when they 
came to town on Saturday. 

Our school-house at that time did not look like the present 
school-house of to-day. Our seats were slabs and boards, 
some wide and some narrow, and the children with different 
kinds of books. Generally a class would consist of four ; not 
more than that. Children came from farms adjoining town, as 
there were very few in the place large enough to go. Charley 
Mitchell, who owned and lived on what is now the Williams 
farm, Aaron Shaul, William Bell, Adam Dobson and Ivan P. 
Snider sent their children ; also Uncle Frank Richmond and 
Stephen Masters. Uncle Adam Dobson was at that time on 
the farm now owned and occupied by Ira Irish. Uncle Adam 
afterwards moved to the farm on which he lived so long, near 
the cross roads, which at that time had a log cabin on it, occu- 
pied by Zeke Garrison. It was then thick woods to town from 
there. 

Colonel Abel Johnson bought the corner lot next to Mr. 
Mingle, upon which he had a small hewn log house put up, 
into which he put a small stock of goods, so then there were 
two stores in the town of Pendleton. Old Mr. Pendleton's 
large log house was by this time completed, into which they 
had moved, and from this time was used as a church until the 
regular church was built, where the present one now stands. 
Just before my father moved his family there, or near about 
the same time, Thomas Silver, an older brother of William 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 239 

Silver, had come to Pendleton, and traded for the falls mill and 
other lands near there, some below town, upon which he had 
another mill built. He then proposed going into the dry goods 
business with my father, he owning part of the goods and 
father owning part of the mill property, but the partnership 
did not last long, as he became again owner of the mills and 
father of the store. The Falls mill was run by a man named 
Perkins, I think. Mr. Silver sold the mills to Samuel Irish and 
his father. Ma}' 31st, the next year after we moved there. 

Jesse Boston, his family, and his brother's wife and her 
family, moved to Pendleton. They came by public conveyance 
to Cincinnati, then to Pendleton by wagons, with the exception 
of Mrs. Boston, who drove what was called at that time a carry- 
all, just like the delivery wagons of to-day. Mr. Boston bought 
Mr. Mingle's property, and the tavern changed landlords. Mr. 
Boston then built a large two-story and a hatf hewn log house 
to take the place of the log cabin that stood there. Mr. Boston 
being a shoemaker, brought his apprentice with him, and, as 
he moved the little cabin back, kept it for a shoe shop, and soon 
had plenty to do. 

Colonel Johnson then built the long, low white house on 
the corner where the cabbage garden was, a store room and 
dwelling together, which afterwards burned as the property of 
James L. Bell, father of Mrs. Judge Pierce. Mr. Boston kept 
tavern in the log house until he built the house at present 
owned and occupied by David Clark. 

After Mr. Dobson moved to the cross roads he sold his 
farm to a gentleman by the name of Archibald Cooney. Mr. 
James L. Bell came from West Virginia. It was he who built 
the brick house, owned and occupied by Mrs. Dr. Stephenson, 
then Dr. John H. Cook, his brother-in-law. Mr. Bell built 
himself a house on the lot where Will I. Lukins now has his 
home. Then Harry Pendleton put up the house now owned 
by Mrs. Lu Taylor, which he occupied and kept as a hotel, as 
old Mr. Pendleton had died, and the old lady was making her 
home with her daughter, Mrs. Eliza Richmond, of Indianapo- 
lis. Then came Judge Andrew Jackson, the father of Mrs. 
R. Clark, Bliven and Sabin, and he had a large two-story log 
house built on the same lot where Mrs. MoUie Lukens' white 



240 THE PIONEERS OF 

brick now stands, which he and his family occupied until he 
moved to Anderson. Mr. Cooney sold the Dobson farm to 
Samuel Irish. The farm is now owned and occupied by Ira, 
the youngest son. 

We had hitherto had but one ta\ ern, as they were called 
then, but now Uncle Nat Richmond bought the lot where Mrs. 
Catharine Gibbon's house now stands, and built a one-story 
and a half log house, and put up a sign with " Inn " on it. Of 
course it was a question of what kind of a house it was to be, 
but as Uncle Nat stood very high, anything he did was right. 
He kept his inn for awhile, I forget just how long, and sold out 
to Matthew Jones, father of Dr. T. N. and Jones. 

Judge Jackson still lived across the street from Mr. Jones, 
and as his lot ran back of him some distance he built a double 
log house and filled it with machinery suitable for a carding 
machine, and, asJie was an experienced wool carder, he had 
all that he could do, which was before the carding machine, as 
it was then called, was in operation at the Falls, which was 
not commenced until some time after that. A small building 
was first put up by Mr. Sam Irish, and he, with his cousin, 
Mr. Diball, brought machinery and now started the Falls card- 
ing machine, which they afteward enlarged. 

The court was still held in Major McCartney's double log 
house, and the people were some of them talking of moving 
the court-house to Anderson, but there was no court-house for 
them to occupy if they did move, except a part of a dwelling- 
house. But some of the farmers thought it would be more in 
the center of the county and there was much discussion over 
it. As usual, in small country villages, every evening groups 
of men would be talking over the matter, and, of course, they 
succeeded in getting it moved there. 

Mr. John Gray purchased the lower mill, which brought 
Mr. James Gray, his nephew, out to see to his business. He 
purchased the corner from father, on which his stable stood, 
and built the frame building which is still there, although it 
has been changed considerable from what it was at the time it 
was built. About this time Mr. D. S. Noble and Mr. Mershon 
came there from Dayton, Mr. Noble purchasing the property 
from Mr. Matthew Jones and fitting the building up for a 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 24 1 

store house, in which he and Mr. Mershon sold goods. Judge 
Jackson about this time moved to Anderson, leaving his house 
vacant. The upper part was occupied by the Masons, and the 
lower part as a school-house by Mr. M. G. Walker, of West 
Virginia, and Dr. Ward Cook, a brother of Dr. John H. Cook, 
and Mrs. D. L. Bell. Our cabin on the hill, in which our first 
school was held, was used as a dwelling. My father now 
closed out his stock of goods to collect. He rented the store 
house to Noble & Mershon, and having purchased what is now 
James Silver's farm from Harry Pendleton, we moved out 
there, Mr. and Mrs. Mershon occupying our home in town. 

I was sent to Indianapolis in care of Mr. Calvin Fletcher? 
father of the Messrs. Fletchers, bankers at this time. After 
going to Indianapolis I was sent to Mr. Gregg's seminary, who 
was assisted in his school by Mrs. Eliza Pendleton Richmond, 
widow of Ansel Richmond and brother of Uncle Nat and 
old Dr. John L. Richmond and father of Colonel N. P. 
Richmond, of Kokomo. Mr. Gregg's seminary was largely 
attended by boys at that time, who have become men of 
prominence to-day. Mr. Samuel Merrill, General John Co- 
burn, Laz. Noble and many others, who have distinguished 
themselves in military and State departments. Mrs. Richmond 
was assisted in her department by Miss Marilla Morris, 
daughter of Judge Morris, who, since then, married Mr. 
Gregg. I was at Indianapolis a year, and after my return 
father sold his farm to Mr. Frank Richmond and then he 
purchased the corner from Mr. Harry Pendleton, who had 
been renting it out as a hotel to several different parties. One 
who occupied it for a while as a hotel was Charley Mitchell, 
who had sold his farm to Mr. Jesse Williams, father of Cap- 
tain Elijah and James Williams. After he left it then Mr. 
Samuel Ireland, father of Alex. Ireland, who, in connection 
with the hotel, had the lower mill rented, for Mr. Gray had 
completed his building on the corner and brought on a stock of 
dry goods, when he married Miss Emily Boston, eldest daugh- 
ter of Jesse Boston and sister of Miss A. Taylor and 
Stephenson. He built them a small house at the east side of 
the store, where they resided for some year?, until he sold it to 
Hezekiah Goe, who moved it on the lot where the house now 
H 



242 THE PIONEERS OF 

stands, across the street from where John Johnson's house is 
now. At that time the residence of Dr. M. L. Walker was 
being built there, but was not occupied by him for some time 
afterward. Mr. William Silver then moved to Pendleton, 
bringing a stock of goods, which he moved into the old brick 
corner, and his family occupied the dwelling-house back of 
the store. 

My father now moved his family into the corner, now 
owned by Mrs. Lou Silver Taylor, and had it repaired and the 
store-room enlarged, when he brought on a stock of goods, 
and had hardly begun to engage in the business, until he had 
a letter from his brother, my uncle, Reuben Patrick, who was 
at Cincinnati building a store-boat for the Southern trade, and 
wishing father to engage in the business with him, but my 
mother, not being willing at that time, father thought he would 
take the goods and go and see what he could do. So after 
selling the corner property to Dr. John H. Cook he went down 
there. He made arrangements with Dr. Cook that we were 
to have possession of the property until his return. He had 
not been absent but a short time until Dr. Cook's family got 
impatient about moving into the corner, so mother had Mr. 
Mershon, who was attending to father's business, rent the 
house that was across the street from Mr. Mershon's home, 
and we moved there and let the doctor's family have the 
corner. He did not live there very long until he sold the 
property to Mr. William Silver, who moved his goods and his 
family into it, and it has been in the family since that time. 
I think Mr. James L, Bell, who bought the one-story white 
frame house on the corner from Colonel Johnson, had bad 
luck with it by it having caught fire one night and was burned 
to the ground. That was while we were living across the 
street, and we were dependent on the citizens of the village 
for fighting the fire. Mr. Jesse Boston had by this time built 
the house David Clark lives in, and our house across the street 
were both near the fire, neither caught, as the women and 
children were at the pumps and carried the water until tne fire 
was entirely out. 

Our cabin church was now pulled down and a hewn log 
house put up where the present church now stands, and it 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES, 243 

was generally very nearly filled, as Huntsville had begun to 
improve and several West Virginia farmers had moved out 
west to what was called Foster's Branch, now I think it is 
called Pleasant Valley. Qiiite a number always came to 
church of Sabbath mornings, many spending the remainder of 
the day with friends and going to church at night, for preach- 
ing was not as frequent then as now, and our Methodist 
quarterly meetings were of two or three days duration, 
beginning on Friday afternoon and lasting over Sabbath. We 
also had union meetings, as Uncle Nat Richmond lived there, 
so the Methodists and Baptists often held them together. 

On the road between Anderson and Pendleton, on the 
farm owned by Henry Jones, now owned by John Goul, there 
was a cabin right north of the house, which stood in the 
middle of a field, in which no one lived at that time. Upon 
opening the door one morning an old man was found hanging 
dead. His name was Jake Fox, said to be a distant relative of 
Mrs. Eva Hardway, a former owner of the farm. Such 
a thing in those days did not happen as often as they do now, 
and it formed the theme of conversation for some miles. 

People those days were more friendly, and seemed to 
think nothing of going to spend an evening with a neighbor 
two miles in the country. They most always stayed until 
bed time, and generally a nice supper was gotten ready about 
nine o'clock, after which the visitors returned to their homes, 
while those in the country would come to town, as Pendleton 
was called in those days. At this day no one would hardly 
recognize the place, only in those loca^ties which have the 
same buildings now as then, only changed somewhat in out- 
ward appearance. 

Up stairs over Mr. Silver's store the Masons had their hall 
or lodge room, and up in that room the Degree of Rebekah 
was conferred for the first time in Pendleton, we might say in 
Madison county, in 1851. In November, 1851, Schuyler first 
conferred the degree at Indianapolis at the Grand Lodge, and 
George Armstrong and W. Lunimis, with Taylor Wall and A. 
E. Russell, received the degree, and upon coming home had 
their wives come to the hall and take the Degree of Rebekah 
in the presence of the lodge, as only tliosc named visited the 



244 



THE PIONEERS OF 



Grand Lodge. And from that small initiation those large 
lodges, now a source of pride to our county, are composed of 
our best people, both old and young. At this time Daniel 
Snider, of Pendleton, and myself are the oldest settlers of 
Fall Creek township. Caroline E. Russell. 

Anderson, Madison county, Ind., Nov. lo, 1S95. 

COMMUNICATION FROM DR. WILLIAM SUMAN. 

Mr. Harden : I herewith give a reminiscence of the first 
settlers of Union township. William Dilts was in the town- 
ship as early as 1S20. He settled a quarter of a mile east of 
Chesterfield. His wife. Aunt Jane Dilts, as we all knew her, 
became a very important personage in in the early years. She 
was the midwife of the entire neighborhood. She was often 
called to attend at the bedside of the sick. Mr. Dills had eight 
children in his family, three sons and five daughters. 

Frederick Brandenberg, Sr., first settled on the west side of 
White River, on the hill on what is now known as the Lari- 
more farm, in 1820. He entered the land where his son, 
Carroll Brandenberg, now lives, and there remained until his 
death. As I remember, he was a tanner by trade, and built a 
tanyard at Chesterfield as early as 1831 or 1832, afterwards 
owned and operated by James Williams. Mr. Brandenberg 
built a saw and grist mill, which were destroyed by fire in 1846 
or 1847, and only the saw mill was ever rebuilt. His tanyard 
was the first in the county. His mills were the third in the 
county. His family consisted of seven sons and three daugh- 
ters. 

Amasa Makepeace settled on the east side of Mill Creek 
with his wife and nine children, two daughters and seven sons. 
Mr. Makepeace established the first post-ofiice, and called it 
Mill Creek, and now Chesterfield. He also built a grist mill on 
the same creek. His sons, Allen and George, started, soon after 
settling here, in the mercantile trade, and became wealthy. 
They purchased their goods at Cincinnati, and I have been told 
that their first two-horse wagon loads to that city for goods 
consisted of coon, deer and bear skins, beeswax and a few 
dollars in money. The next time it required three two-horse 
wagons to haul their produce and return with their goods. 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 245 

About 1S43 I saw Frederick Brandenberg and Allen Make- 
peace start to Cincinnati with a drove of over nine hundred 
head of fat hogs. It took twelve days to make the drive. 

James Noland, with his wife, two sons and two daughters, 
settled on what is now known as the poor farm, in 1S24. Mr. 
Noland and wife, in a very few years after settling, died, and 
were the first to be buried in what is now called Chesterfield 
cemetery. Stephen Noland, the oldest son, entered land south 
of Chesterfield, made a farm, and raised a large family. He 
afterwards sold it and moved to Illinois. He died in 1S91; at 
the great age of over ninety years, Brazelton Noland, the 
second son, cleared and made the farm on which his father set- 
tled. He was the prime mover in the erection of the first brick 
church in the county. He made and burned the brick, donated 
the ground, and the building was erected, as I remember, in 
1S43 or 1S43. It was done under the auspices of the United 
Brethren Church. The first trustees were Brazelton Noland, 
Stephen Noland, William Dilts and John Suman: pastor. Rev. 
William Stewart. They named the church Aughterbine, after 
William Aughterbine, the founder of the society of United 
Brethren. Mr. Noland afterwards built the first steam mill in 
Chesterfield, about 1853. He moved to California, and died 
only a few years ago. 

John Suman came to Madison county in 1S23, and settled 
on land one mile west of Chesterfield, then occupied by an 
Indian village called Bucktown. The chiefs name was Buck. 
There is a deep place in the bed of White River, near where 
this village stood, which has always werft by the name of "The 
Bucktown Hole." At that time the Indians were moving to 
another reservation. After they left my father took advantage 
of this, improved it, raised corn, and soon had a large stock of 
hogs, which he made fat, drove them to Cincinnati, sold them, 
and with the money entered the land now known as the John 
Suman farm. My mother is yet living at the age of eighty-six, 
and has full control of the farm. She is now living with her 
sons and one daughter in River Side, California. In 1S46 my 
father purchased and operated on his farm the first threshing 
machine in Union township. About the same time he pur- 
chased a reaping and mowing machine, the first in the township. 



246 THE PIONEERS OF 

My father, myself and brother Peter built, in 1853, the Suman 
mill at Daleville. The mill was afterward sold to the hydraulic 
company. My father had eight children, five sons and three 
daughters. One son and one daughter are dead. Peter, John 
v., Samuel and Mr. and Mrs. Findly are living in River Side, 
California. Myself and Mrs. Mary Gray live in Anderson. 
The Suman family moved from Frederick, Maryland, to Day- 
ton, Ohio, in iSio. In 1S22 a part of them came to this county, 
and in 1SS4 a part of the same family moved to the Pacific 
Coast. My father was a member of the United Brethren 
Church. He died in 1S56, in the sixty-seventh year of his age, 
and was buried at the Chesterfield cemetery. He was a soldier 
in the war of 1812, My uncle, Samuel Suman, entered land 
north of Chesterland, cleared up a farm, built a small grist mill, 
and in coniunction with it operated a small still-house. He was 
the first to purchase and operate a wheat threshing separator 
in Union township. He married Jane Shimer, daughter of 
Isaac Shimer. They had a family of seven children, four sons 
and three daughters, none of which are living. His wife died 
about 1S45. -^^ died in 1S73. They were buried in the Ches- 
terfield cemetery. 

Solomon Isanogle entered land north of Chesterfield three 
miles and made a farm. His family consisted of four sons and 
two daughters. Jacob, his oldest son, was one of the first 
school teachers in the township. Solomon Isanogle was the 
grandfather of the Isanogle boys who were murdered by Statler. 
Mr. Isanogle died in 1844, and was buried in the Mount Pleas- 
ant cemetery in Delaware county. His wife lived twenty-eight 
years after his death, and died at the age of eighty-two years 
in 1876. She was buried by the side of her husband. 

Sarah Suman entered eighty acres of land, three miles 
east of Chesterfield. She married Bazel Neeley in 1833. They 
moved to the land, and made a home and farm. They had but 
one child, Hester A., a wealthy lady of this city. Mrs. 
Neeley died in 1854, and now lies buried in the Mount Pleas- 
ant cemetery in Delaware county. Her husband lived on the 
farm until about the year 1893, when he moved to this city. 
He died August 23, 1894, aged eighty -four. He was buried in 
the same cemetery by his wife. 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 247 

Isaac VanMeter came to Madison county about 1830. He 
settled on the land on the east side of White River, at the Lari- 
more crossing, with his wife and a family of grown young 
men and women. Mr. VanMeter became insane sometime in 
1834, and committed suicide by hanging himself. His wife 
was a very intelligent old lady, and was my first school teacher. 
She died in 1S40, and was buried by her husband in the Ches- 
terfield cemetery. 

James McClanahan came to Madison county in 1829 
with a family of eight children, two sons and six daughters. 
He bought a piece of land along the north side of the old State 
road, half a mile east of the " Mounds." The old house is still 
standing, and in it the writer was united in marriage to the 
youngest daughter. Marietta, in 1850. Mr. McClanahan died 
in 1840, and was buried in the Chesterfield cemetery. His wife 
died in 1S56, and was buried by his side. 

John Martin entered the land where the " Mounds " are, 
and built J*is house just east of them. Frederick Brandenberg, 
Jr., bought the tarm of Mr. Martin, and owns it still Mr. Mar- 
tin bought the John Fosnat farm, half a mile east of the 
" Mounds." Mr. Martin died in 1873. John Fosnat first owned 
the Martin farm. He and his wife died there, and were buried 
at the Chesterfield cemetery. 

Henry Russell entered land south of Chesteafield, and 
made a farm. It was at his house the first Methodist church 
organization was established in Union township, as early as 
1831 or 1833. My mother, Elizabeth Suman, was a member. 

Dr. Valentine Dunham, with his wife, in 1834, came to 
Madison county, Union township. The land on w^hich he 
settled had not a tree amiss. Here he made a farm, and, as 
ague and other diseases were very prevalent, his family was 
frequently sick, and as he had to pay pretty large doctor bills, 
in his own language, kept him a poor man. In 1840 his 
father, a physician, died. In the division of property the 
books and an old-fashioned turnkey, for extracting teeth, and a 
lancet, an instrument with which they bled sick people in 
those days, fell to Valentine, his son. Coming into possession 
of these he began to read medicine, intending it only for the 
benefit of his own family. He worked hard and read his 



248 THE PIONEERS OF 

books, and would ride to Chesterfield after night and have Dr. 
George W. Godwin, of that place, instruct him. From that 
time until his death he was an active and successful physician. 
The Doctor was born in Monongahela county, Virginia, in 
1812. 

David Shafer and wife, one son and two daughters, about 
1834, settled on land just south of Chesterfield. They were 
German, and the first in the township unable to talk English. 
They died about 1843 °'' ^^44» ^^^ were buried in the Christ 
cemetery in Delaware county, 

Edward Johns, with his wife, two sons and five daughters, 
came to Indiana in 1829, first settling one mile west of Ches- 
terfield on the old State road. He was buried in the cemetery 
at Chesterfield. William Johns, the eldest son of Edward 
Johns, started the first permanent blacksmith shop in Chester- 
field as early as 1S33 or 1834. See his sketch on another page. 

Dr. David Dunham and wife came to Madison county in 
1834 and settled in Anderson township, with a family of eight 
children, six sons and two daughters. In the same year he 
entered eight eighty-acre tracts of land in Union township. 
Dr. David Dunham and wife were buried in the Nelson 
cemetery. Dr. Valentine, Aswell, Elizabeth and Olive were 
buried in the Nelson cemetery. 

William Free, with his wife and family, came from 
Ohio to Madison county, Union township, in 1839, and settled 
on the north bank of White River, one and one-half miles 
north-west of Chesterfield. Mr. Free at once built a log 
cabinet shop, and in a short time was furnishing everybody 
with all kinds of household furniture. Chairs were made a 
specialty of, some of which are yet found in the country. 
They were members of the Protestant Methodist Church. 
His house was a place where regular and protracted meetings 
were held during his lifetime. The last day of his life, Sep- 
tember 15, 1S56, was passed in his church at Mount Pleasant, 
Delaware county. His wife, Jane Free, died June 6, 1868. 
They were buried in Chesterfield cemetery. 

Henry Leathers came to Indiana about 1824 from North 
Carolina. He entered land on both sides of White River, 
east and west of what is now known as the Bronenberg ford, 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 249 

in Union township. He at once set about the construction of 
a mill on the west side of the river at the Bronenberg ford. 
His first wife was Miss Hannah Dale. She died in 1S39 or 
1S30, and was buried in her father's family burying place at 
Daleville. She left a son, George W., who was the father of 
William and Leonard Leathers. He was married the second 
time to Mrs. McCullough Mash, who survived him, 1834. 
He was buried in the Chesterfield cemetery. 

FROM JAMES HOLLINGSWORTH. 

North Anderson, May, 1895. 

My Old Friend Harden: Old and feeble I write you a 
few lines about the early settlement of Madison county, as I 
understand you are getting out a work entitled the Pioneer. 
I am glad you have undertaken the task so much desired. Our 
first settlers are fast passing away, and but few remain to-day. 
It so happens that I am one of those remaining, left standing 
alone between the living and the dead, trying to say a word 
about things and matters happening seventy years ago. I 
have lived to witness vast changes in Madison county during 
those long years. Little by little we have grown from a 
handful of poor families in 1S20 to over fifty thousand souls 
up to date, 1895. From almost poverty we have grown to be 
worth $30,000,000; the timber and brush have mostly dis- 
appeared; broad and well cultivated fields have taken the 
place once occupied by the choicest timber; railroads have 
come, and many other privileges unthought of by the pioneers 
in 1820. I am glad I am spared to be a living witness to so 
many happy changes, and to live so many years in so good a 
county as Madison and to review the scenes that sevent}^ years 
have brought. I will not be able to tell the joys and privations 
gone through with during those three score and ten years, but 
will try and give a condensed letter for your book if you think 
it worthy a place in the Pioneer. 

My father, Elias Hollingsworth, was born in South 
Carolina in 1793, and came to Madison county, Indiana, in 
1S20. He first settled at or near the falls of Fall Creek, where 
Pendleton now is. I was born in Ohio in 181^, consequently 
I was but five years old when my parents came. Everything, 



250 THE PIONEERS OF 

as I said, was new there. Our neighbors were the famihes of 
Shauls, McCartneys, Pendletons, Dobsons, Judge Winsell, Dr. 
Boardwell, Adamsons, Israel Cox, Pahner Patrick, Jacob Shells 
and Thomas Bell. Soon after there came Dr. Ward and John 
H. Cook, Chapmans, Busbys, Silvers and Walkers. There 
was little for us to begin with at first, in fact, we did not want 
much, but by strict economy and industry plenty came as we 
deserved it. I have passed through all the scenes of pioneer 
life, the "flax break," "spinning wheel," the "corn grater," the 
"grain flail," cleaning wheat with a wind sheet, the lamp stuck 
in the crack of a log of the cabin, the log school-house, with 
greased paper to let the light in, and, in fact, all the accom- 
paniments of that day, all of which have long ago disappeared. 

Soon after our arrival the McCartneys built a rude grist 
mill, and then we were at home, so to speak, and from that 
time till to-day (1S95) the Falls mills have been in operation. 
Then the Irishes built a better one and a woolen factory, and 
one after another the advantages came. The log school-house 
soon disappeared and a better one took its place. 

The Indian murders, which happened up the creek about 
eight miles (on the Cooper farm now), gave us considerable 
trouble and uneasiness. Then Sawyer, Bridges and Hudson 
were hung for the murder of those Indians near the Falls in 
1834 and 1835. Soon after the hanging things quieted down 
and we rested easy in our little cabins. There was a good 
many Indians when we first came to the county on Fall Creek 
and White River till 1833, when, by stipulation by the Govern- 
ment, they left for the far West. 

In 1830 we moved north of White River and my mother 
died, I think in 1849; is buried in Richland township. My 
father died in Missouri in 1846. I was married to Elizabeth 
Shinkle in March, 1S36. She was born in Ohio, February 6, 
1819, and died October 5, 1891, after living fifty-five years and 
seven months. She is buried at the Anderson cemetery. 

Twelve children were born to us, some of whom are 
deceased, others somewhat scattered in different parts of the 
country. Among our neighbors in and near Anderson, after 
we moved from the Falls, were Collins Tharp, William 
Curtis, John Berry, John Croan, the Shinkles family, R. N. 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 25 1 

Williams, W. G. Atherton, Thomas G. Clark, G. T. Hoover, 
Alfred Makepeace, Dr. Wyman, Andrew Jackson, Oren 
Todhnnter, John H. Davis, Judge Lake and Dr. J. W. Wester- 
field. Soon after many families came in, all of whom I knew 
up to 1840. Since then I have given up the idea of knowing 
everybody, and to-day I know but few. My old friends and 
neighbors are gone, and, as I said, I am almost alone in the 
world. Yet I enjoy life well and have good health for one of 
my age, and I delight to attend the old settlers' meetings. I 
have attended nearly all ever held in the county, and that of 
1894 was the best of all. I hope the citizens will keep up this 
time-honored custom. Yes, we live in a grand county, and it 
is worth preserving and improving. I trust we will continue 
to prosper as in the past. We are living in a day of progres- 
sion, the gas era, the grandest of all, and I hope it has come to 
stay. And now, Mr. liarden, thanks to you for the deep 
interest you have always taken in us old folks, and for the 
privilege of saying a word in your book. But few have lived 
in the county as long as I have. Before I cease let me urge all 
to stick to the party that sticks to the people and trust all will 
be well in the end. James Hollingsworth. 



OUR LAMENTED DEAD. 



A page or two is devoted to the memory of some of those 
who have Hved in Madison county, but now deceased. I will 
refer only to those who were generally known and have made 
their mark. Most of them came to the county in the morning 
of their life, when hopes ran high. They came, strong and 
active, ready for life's conflict. Imagine them getting out of 
their wagons and unloading their scanty goods in the deep 
snow and thick woods, with jaded teams ; some with a little 
family, with scattered neighbors; no schools, no churches, or 
roads. Thus we find quite a number who we wish to remem- 
ber in this volume. As far as possible, will give when they 
came and where born and where they lie buried. Some are 
buried in the county they came to in early life, and lived here 
long enough to see the county developed to some extent. Some 
are sleeping in other parts of the country, but wherever they 
are buried they will be remembered as pioneers of Madison 
county, and as such we wish to record them. In giving those 
names no special plan will be given as to location or alphabeti- 
cal arrangement, but given as their names come up in our 
memory. 

Thomas Bell, born in Kentucky ; came to Madison county, 
Indiana, in 1828 ; served eleven years in the Indiana Legisla- 
ture ; died in 1862 ; is buried at the Gilmore cemetery in Adams 
township. 

Judge Samuel HoUiday, born in Kentucky in 1780; came 
to Madison county in 1822 ; served as Associate Judge ; died 
in 1835 ; is buried in Hamilton county, Indiana. 

Dr. John Hunt, born in Wayne county, Indiana, in 1817 ; 
died in Arkansas in 1895 ; first wife died in 1S55 ; is buried at 
Huntsville. 

W. B. Allen, born in Kentucky in 1809 ; came to Madison 
county in 1828 ; died in 1882 ; is buried at Anderson cemetery. 
Mrs. Allen died December, 1879. 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 253 

Colonel Nin Berry, born in Ohio in 1804 ; came to Madi- 
son county, Indiana, in 1S21 ; died in 1883 ; buried at Anderson. 

John Berry, father of Nin Berry, born in Pennsylvania in 
1777 ; came to Madison county in 183 1 ; died in 1835 ; buried in 
Huntington county, Indiana. 

Willis G. Atherton, born in Kentucky in 1799 ; came to 
Madison county in 1830 ; member of the Indiana Legislature in 
1840; died in Iowa in 187 1. 

Dr. Henry Wyman came to Madison county in 1830; died 
in Michigan in 1892, aged eighty-six years. 

Fred Bronenberg, Sr., born in Germany in 1783 ; came to 
the county in 1820 ; died in 1853. 

Isaac Busby, born in Virginia in 1800 ; died April, 1874 ; 
is buried at the Busby cemetery, near his old home. 

Thomas Busby, born in Virginia ; came to the county in 
1727 ; died in Stony-Creek township in 1865. 

Thomas G. Clark, born in Virginia in 1806 ; came to Mad- 
ison county, Indiana, in 1840 ; elected to the Indiana Legislature 
in 1856 ; died in Wayne county, Indiana, in 1870. 

Rev. John W. Forrest, born in Virginia in 1810 ; came to 
Boone township in 1846 ; died there in 1886 ; is buried at the 
Forrestville cemetery. He was a Baptist minister. His first 
wife died a few years previous ; is buried at the same place. 
His second wife died in 1889. 

Thomas L. Beckwith, born in New York in 1S15 ; came to 
Madison county in 1820 ; lived many years at Perkins ville, 
where he kept store and post-office thirty-five years ; elected 
County Commissioner in 1S52. He died at Perkinsville in 1887, 
and is buried there, as well as his wife, who died in 1893. 

Conrad Crossly, born in Virginia in 1799; came to near 
Pendleton in 1820. He died in 1869 ; is buried on his old farm, 
four miles south-west of Pendleton. 

Dr. John H. Cook, born in Virginia in 1809; came to the 
county in 1831 ; died at Pendleton in 1864. 

Dr. John W. Perry came to Alexandria about the year 1835, 
and practiced medicine fifty-two years. He died near that 
place, June, 1895, ^"*^ ^^ buried there. 

Judge Hervey Craven, born in Franklin county, Indi- 
ana, in 1S23 ; came to Madison county in 1850, and settled at 



254 '^"■^ PIONEERS OF 

Pendleton, where he practiced law ; elected Judge in 1S72 ; 
elected State Senator in 185S ; entered the army in 1861 ; Col- 
onel of the Eighty-ninth Regiment. He died April 13, 1880 ; 
is buried at Pendleton. 

Adam Dobson, born in Virginia in 1786 ; came to near 
Pendleton in 1S28 ; died there, November, 1894, aged ninety- 
eight years ; is buried at Pendleton cemetery. 

Elias Hollings worth, born in South Carolina in 1793 ; came 
to Madison county in 1820 ; died in Missouri in 1S46. His 
wife died in 1863 ; is buried in Richland township, Madison 
county, Indiana. A grand, good woman. The above are the 
parents of James Hollingsworth, who has lived in the county 
since 1820, or seventy-five years. Mrs. James Hollingsworth 
died, October 5, 1S91. 

Thomas McAllister, born in Virginia in 1796 ; came to 
Madison county in 1830 ; was in the Legislature for several 
terms ; settled in Adams township, where he died in 1853, His 
wife died in 1891, aged ninety-three years. Both buried at the 
McAllister cemetery, near the old home. 

John McAllister, born in Virginia in 1794; came to the 
county in 1S30. He served as County Commissioner in 1854. 
He died in Anderson in 1858. His wife died in 1891, aged 
eighty-four years. Both buried at Anderson cemetery. 

William Roach, born in Ohio, December 4, 1809 ; came to 
Madison county in 1832 ; elected Sheriff' in 1S49 '' served till 
1S52 ; elected Mayor of the city of Anderson in 1871, and 
served till 1874 ; served as Justice of the Peace ; was a thirty- 
two degree Mason. He died, February 11, 1893, and is buried 
at the Huntsville cemetery. Mrs. Roach died, December 8, 
1878, and is buried at Huntsville cemetery. A grand couple, 
whose memory we all revere. 

Henry Sybert, born in Virginia ; came to the county in 
1830 ; died in 1856 ; is buried near his farm, between Anderson 
and Pendleton. His wife died in 1869 ; is buried at the same 
place. 

Nichol Sybert, born in Virginia. He died in 1862, and is 
buried at the Sybert cemetery, between Pendleton and Ander- 
son. Was County Commissioner. 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 255 

Isaac Sybert, born in Virginia ; came in 1830 ; died on his 
farm, where he is buried, in 1S5S. His wife is yet hving (1895). 

WilHam Sybert, born in Virginia ; came to the county in 
1830 ; died in 1853 ; is buried at Pendieton cemetery. 

Robert N. Wilhams, born in North Carohna ; came to the 
county in 1828 ; was the first Mayor of Anderson, in 1865. He 
represented the county in 1847-8 ; also served as Auditor, Clerk 
and Recorder. He died in 1869 ; father of A. D. and Augus- 
tus Williams. A. D. died in 1895. Both buried at Anderson 
cemetery. 

Ralph "Williams, born in Franklin county, Indiana, Novem- 
ber 15, iSio; came to Madison county in 1834. He was a 
merchant of Markleville for many years ; the first Free Soiler in 
Adams township, in 1848. He died in Markleville in 1889 ; is 
buried at the AIcAllister cemetery, in Adams township. Mrs. 
W. died, January 14. 1881. She was a daughter of Fred Wen- 
dell, an early settler of Lick Creek. 

Dr. Joel Pratt, born in Massachusetts in 1826 ; came to 
Madison county in 1841. He died in 1872, and is burid at Pen- 
dleton. His wife, formerly Miss Patrick, died in 1S58 ; buried 
at Pendleton. 

Dr. Townsend Ryan was born in Pennsylvania in 1813 ; 
came when a young man to Madison county, in 1S42, where he 
practiced medicine for twenty years. He was in the Indiana 
State Legislature in 1846-7, and Lieutenant Colonel of the 
Thirty-fourth Indiana Volunteers. He died about the year 
1S78, and is buried at Anderson cemetery. His wife died 
about 1890. 

Hon. M. S. Robinson, born in Ripley county, Indiana, in 
1832 ; came to Anderson in 1850, and practiced law up to his 
death, in 1890. He was a member of Congress in 1874, served 
in the State Senate in 1866, and Colonel of the Seventy-fifth 
Indiana Volunteers. 

Andrew Shanklin was born in Virginia, June, 1805 ; came 
to Madison county in 1830 : settled on Foster's Branch, three 
miles west of Pendleton. He was a prominent man and a 
Methodist ; served as Justice of the Peace in 1840 ; elected a 
member of the Constitutional Convention in 1850 ; represented 



256 THE PIONEERS OF 

the county in the State Legislature in 1852-3. He died in 1S65, 
and is buried at the Pleasant Grove cemetery, near his old home. 

Rev. William A. Thompson, born in Virginia, October 12, 
1803 ; came to the county in 1839 '■> settled in Lafayette town- 
ship, and resided there many years ; died in Sullivan county, 
Indiana, about the year 1880. His wife died, May 3, 1864. 
Mr. Thompson was a member of the Indiana Legislature in 
1856-7, and County Commissioner in 1863. He served long 
and well. A Baptist minister. 

Judge Adam Winsell was born in North Carolina about 
the year 1790 ; came to Madison county in 1823 ; settled two 
miles east of Pendleton, on Winsell's Branch. He was elected 
Associate Judge in 1824. A blacksmith by trade, and of lim- 
ited education, but a strong and determined man. He went to 
Missouri about the year 1840, and lived to be quite old, perhaps 
eighty-five 3'ears. 

Wright Smith, an early settler of Boone township, was 
born in Virginia in 1798; came to Madison county in 1856. 
He was a prominent man and a Methodist. He died in 1863, 
and is buried near his old home, at the Forrestvllle cemetery. 
His wife lived to be very old ; has been dead twenty-five 
years. 

Rev. Nathaniel Richmond, one of the pioneer preachers 
of Madison county (a Baptist), came in 1820 In 1850 he went 
West, and died there at the age of seventy-one years. He was 
a son of Nathaniel Richmond and brother of Rev. F. M. Rich- 
mond and Lorena Eastman, a grand pioneer family ; came from 
New York. Joseph Eastman was born in New Hampshire in 
1805, and came to Pendleton in 1830. He was a devoted 
Mason and polished gentleman for his day. His wife, Lorena 
Richmond, went West, and lived to be very old. Mr. Eastman 
died at Pendleton in 1866. 

Judge John Davis, one of the first attorneys of Anderson, 
was born in Maryland in 181 2 ; came to Anderson in 1837 ; 
was a grand attorney, and was elected Judge of the Circuit 
Court in 1867 ; a member of the Constitutional Convention in 
i8co ; member of the State Legislature in 1842. He died in 
1875, and is buried at Anderson cemetery. 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 257 

John Hayes was born in Chester county, Pennsylvania, 
February, 1S2S ; came to Madison county, Indiana, in 1859, and 
settled three miles north-east of Pendleton. He was elected to 
tlie Indiana Legislature from Madison county in 1S60. He was 
a devoted Mason and polished gentleman. He married Agnes 
Gilmore in 1S60. He died, February 4, 1863, and is buried at 
the Gilmore cemetery, near New Columbus, Madison county. 

Morris Gilmore was born in West Virginia in 1807 ; came 
to Madison countv, Indiana, in 1838 ; settled near New Colum- 
bus, Adams township, where he lived and prospered, and his 
family' was among the first, as well as the best, in the county. 
A Methodist and an old Whig. He died, December, 1879. His 
wife, Miss Blazier, died, March, 18S1. Both are buried at the 
Gilmore cemeter3% on the old farm. 

John Tilson was born in Ohio in 1802 ; came to Huntsville 
about 1840, where he entered into the mercantile business, in 
which he continued up to his death, 1864. A grand, good man 
and among the first Spiritualists in the county. He is buried, 
as well as his wife, at the Huntsville cemetery. His second 
wife was Mrs. Miriam Johnson. 

Jesse W. Roberts was born in Pennsylvania in 1801 ; came 
to Huntsville in 1843 ; served sixteen years as postn:iaster there. 
He died about 1877, He was twice married. He was a Qiia- 
ker, and shoemaker by trade. His second wife was Anna 
Charles, daughter of William Williams. All buried at the 
Huntsville cemetery. 

Rev. James F. Collier, a Baptist minister, born in Kentucky 
in 1801 ; came to Adams township in 1836, where he lived up 
to his death, 1881. His first wife died in 1849 ; second in 1894. 
Both, as well as he, are buried at the Collier cemetery, on the 
old farm. A fine monument marks their resting place. 

Henry Plummer was born in North Carolina in 1806 ; came 
to Madison county in 1836, and settled on Pipe Creek, near 
Frankton, where he died about the year 1878. He served as 
County Commissioner for several years, acceptable to the peo- 
ple. He was a member of the Christian Church. His wife 
died in 1873. Both buried at the Frankton cemetery. 

Joseph Funk came to Madison county about 1850, settling 
midwav between Anderson and Alexandria, where he died 



258 THE PIONEERS OF 

about the year 1883. He was a member of the Dunkard 
Church, and born in Pennsylvania in 180S. His wife died a 
few years previous to his death. Was County Commissioner. 

Dr. J. M. Dellority came to Elwood in 1840, and entered 
the general practice and became wealthy. He, for the last 
fifteen years of his life, was engaged in the mercantile and 
banking business. He was about seventy years of age when 
he died (about 1885). Is buried at the Elwood cemetery. 

Mark Simmons came early to Elwood, and laid oft' an addi- 
tion to Qiiincy (now Elwood). A very prominent family. 
He died several years ago. Among his children living in and 
near Elwood are Melvin, William and Mark, and perhaps 
others. 

Colonel T. N. Stilwell was born in Ohio in 1824 ; came to 
Anderson late in the forties. He, with his father, J. G. Stil- 
well, was engaged in the banking business. He was elected to 
Congress in 1864, and represented Madison county in the Leg- 
islature in 1S58. He died, January, 1874. in the prime of life. 
He was Colonel of the Thirty-fourth Indiana Volunteers ; 
built the Stilwell House in 1871 in Anderson, Indiana. 

Nathan E. Tumilson came when a young man to Alexan- 
dria, entered the mercantile business, and for over thirty-five 
years continued in the trade there. He served many years as 
postmaster, and was a useful man. He died at Alexandria little 
past the meridian of life, highly respected. He was born 
about the year 1808, and is buried at the Alexandria cemetery. 

Dudley Doyle came to Boone township early in the forties, 
and resided there till his death, 1878, at which time he was near 
seventy years of age. 

John M. Nelson (Hog John) was for years a prominent 
man in Madison county. He came as early as 1S40 to the 
county, and kept the poor farm for many years. He died at 
Daleville in 1S94, aged seventy-four years. 

Archibald Justice was born in Virginia in 1809 ; came to 
the county in 1830, and settled in Adams township, where he 
died in 1894. His wife died in 1893. Buried at the McAllister 
cemetery, near the old home. 

James Hazlett was born in Kentucky in 1809 ; came to the 
county in 1838 and soon became one of the foremost men. He 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 259 

has served as County Commissioner, Clerk, Treasurer, and 
was, in 187S, elected Mayor of the city of Anderson. In 18S7 
the family moved to California, where they both died. She in 
1892, he in 1894 ; buried at Riverside, California. 

Lanty Roach was born in Virginia in 1806 ; came to 
Madison county in 1830. He settled first on Fall Creek, but 
the last twenty years of his life he has lived near Frankton, on 
Pipe Creek. He was married to Miss Susan Brown, sister of 
L. D. Brown, Dr. Martin Brown, Garret Brown, Mrs. Nichol- 
son, Mrs. Lemon and Mrs. Veach. Mr. and Mrs. Roach are 
both buried at Frankton. 

Brazleton Noland and family were highly respected citi- 
zens of Chesterfield, coming there back in the twenties. He, 
as well as his son, W. W., served as County Treasurer. Mr. 
B. Noland was born about the year 1790 ; died in California in 
1880. 

James Perkins came with his father to Perkinsville in 1826 
when he was ten or twelve years of age, where he lived up to 
his death some ten years ago ; buried at the Perkinsville ceme- 
tery. 

George W. Sears lived many years near Fishersburg. He 
was born in Ohio in 1820 ; came to Madison county in 1849. 
Mrs. Sears, formerly Catherine Graham, married in 1849. She 
died in June, 1887. He died in 1891. Methodists and Repub- 
lican. 

John J. Lewis was born near Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 
about the year 1806 ; came to the Qiiaker settlement, three 
miles east of Pendleton, in an early day in the thirties and 
where he resided till his death, about the year 1S80. He was a 
useful man, polished in his manners and a well-informed gen- 
tleman. His companion died a few years previous to him. 
They are buried at the Qiiaker cemetery, near their old home. 
Mr. L. was about seventy-five years of age, his wife sixty 
years. 

G. W. Bowen came about the year 1840 to Anderson and 
opened a tailor shop. Served^ several years as Justice. Built 
the Dr. Chittenden house about the year 1848. He married a 
daughter of Willis G. Atherton, who died thirty years later ; 



26o THE PIONEERS OF 

both buried at the Anderson cemetery. Mr. Bowen died about 
the year iS6o. 

Mrs. James Hollingsworth (formerly Miss Curtis), a 
grand, good woman, lived in the county sixty-five years. She 
died October 5, 1S91, aged seventy-two years ; is buried at the 
Anderson cemetery. 

William (Billy) Myers came to the county quite early 
and settled in Anderson. Kept hotel for years, and he and his 
wife, Julia, were very popular as landlord and ladv. He died 
January 3, 1S67, .aged sixtY-nine years. Mrs. Myers died 
October 7, 1871, aged sixty-six years and nine months ; both 
buried at the Anderson cemetery. 

Colonel William Young, a very popular man, came to the 
county when a young man. He was quite well known 
throughout the county. He represented Madison county in 
the Indiana Legislature in 1846-47. He died August 20, 1S63, 
aged sixty-six years, three months and twenty days. His wife, 
Jemima, died November 33, 1S51, aged fifty-two years, seven 
months and fifteen days ; both buried at the Anderson ceme- 
tery. 

Mrs. John H. Davis, a grand, good woman, wife of J. H. 
Davis, came early to Madison county and is deserving of a 
special notice. She died in Lafayette township December 5, 
1893, aged sixtv-seven 3'ears, seven months and twenty-seven 
days ; is buried at the Anderson cemetery. 

Lewis W. Thomas was born about the year 1800 in Penn- 
sylvania ; came to the Qiiaker settlement back in the thirties. 
He was a splendid man, useful from first to last, serving in 
many places of trust and profit, always honoring himself, a 
good business man and honest. His death, which occurred 
January 16, 1S64, was greatly regretted by all. He is buried at 
the Qiiaker cemetery, near his old home. 

Mrs. William A. Kittinger died at her home in the city of 
Anderson in 1895, ^S^^ forty years. A grand, good woman, 
loved in life and lamented in death and a member of the Re- 
bekah degree of L O. O. F., by which order she was buried at 
Anderson. Her death cast a gloom over the city that seldom 
ever before occurred. She leaves a husband, W. A. Kittinger, 
and three bright children, Theodore A., Leslie F- and Hellen M. 



i 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 26 1 

Lizzie Henry we mourn as one of the noble women of 
Madison county. She was born here and loved and respected 
all through her life. She was the daughter of George and 
Hulda (Miller) Grifhth. She died in Anderson in 1895, aged 
thirty-eight years. Her funeral was one of the largest ever 
known in Anderson. 

Following will be found an obituary notice at the time of 
her demise : 

Amidst the rush and hurry of passing events we should pause to 
speak a word and drop a tear in memory of one who has just passed to a 
higher life. In the prime of strong, active womanhood, or at least 
noontide of life, it seems sad indeed that she should be called away. It 
is not strange that so many hearts are sad to-day when we call to 
memory the many kind acts of Lizzie Henry. Often has the writer 
seen her at the bedside of the sick and afflicted with a basketful of the 
daintiest and most nourishing eatables and sweet-smelling bouquets of 
flowers, which always bring comfort and cheer to the sick-room. And 
while the many pretty floral tributes to the deceased to-day will soon 
fade and become withered, the memory of her who has been so kind to 
the rich and poor alike will remain green so long as her many friends 
inay live. Sam Harden. 

William Curtis came to the county early in the twenties, 
and all through life a useful citizen. He was elected County 
Commissioner in 1841, and served several years ; also served as 
Justice of the Peace in Lafayette township. He was born in 
1793, moved to Missouri in 1844, and died there in 1873. He 
served as County Agent, and was a fine scholar. 

George Moore was born in North Carolina in 1774 ; came 
to VanBuren township in 1836, helped organize the township, 
and was a very useful man in the early settlement of the county. 
He died, April, 1871. 

Collins Tharp, born in North Carolina, another grand old 
pioneer, came as early as 1835 to the county, and was active in 
the church as well as the State. He died in 1845. Mrs. Tharp 
died in 185 1. Both buried at the Anderson cemetery. 



THE SHADOWS ON THE WALL. 



BY WILL WATERS. 



Sweet thoughts flock home at twilight, 

When my lamp is dim and low; 
Then fancy paints dear pictures 

Of the scenes of long ago. 
Now, loving arms enfold me, 

'Tis the sweetest scene of all — 
I see my mother rocking 

'Mong the shadows on the wall. 

I love the dear old shadows. 

As I sit within my room, 
For old time scenes come trooping 

Through the silence and the gloom. 
A pleasure oft will thrill me, 

And a tear drop often fall, 
As memory paints rare pictures 

'Mong the shadows on the wall. 

I view another picture 

Of a man so great and grand — 
My brave and fearless hei-o 

Of childhood's happy land. 
Just out there in the gloaming 

I hear his hearty call — 
I run to meet my father 

'Mong the shadows on the wall. 

The face of a fair maiden 

The shadows now disclose. 
With smiles upon her features 

Like sunbeams on a rose. 
'Tis just a bit of romance 

That in my life did fall. 
Her blue eyes gaze upon me 

From the shadows on the wall. 



DEDICATED TO THE LATE 

WESLEY WILLIAMS 

AND OTHER PIONEERS 

OF HANCOCK COUNTY. 



I have some friends in Hancock county that I want to 
remember in this work, and I have set apart this space for 
a notice of them, for there Hves no people that I delight to 
think of more than those living in Hancock and adjoining 
counties. It seems so close that the line dissappears that 
divides the two counties. In 1880 I first became acquainted 
with some of the people there, and have learned to respect 
them as true, good friends. 

Some of those grand men and women have passed 
away since then and are sleeping in the cemeteries of the 
county, especially the one whose memory this part of the 
work is most respectfully dedicated, Wesley Williams, 
who lived so long in Hancock county and one who was 
uppermost among us in life, and who lies to-day (1895) in 
the beautiful cemetery (Simmons) near his old home. 
His kindness to me all through our acquaintance has 
prompted me to dedicate this work in part to his memory, 
a promise made while he was living and which I wish to 
carry out now, a promise made to him when we were alone 
some years ago. 



266 ' THE PIONEERS OF 

There are many others whose memory is as dear to 
me who, like Mr. Williams, are now dead, and who 1 de- 
light to remember here and elsewhere when fond 
recollections call them up. I will not be able to write of 
them as I desire or as their memory deserves, yet will try 
and write of them truthfully if not so eloquently as I would 
like. So many names come rushing up that I cannot 
recall but some of them here, such as Joseph Wright, 
Abner Dunn, Thomas Collins, William Collins, Mr. and 
Mrs. David Thomas, Dr. Trees, Stephen and Hiram 
Harlan, Mrs. David Gooding, Mrs. Caroline Yetter, Rev. 
David Caudell, Joseph Wynn, George Nibarger, John 
Nibarger, Samuel Arnett, Abram Nibarger, John Van- 
dyke and wife, Mrs. John McCray, Meredith Walker, 
Mrs. John Roberts, Seth Walker, Robert Blakely, Mrs. 
Jesse Collins, Mr. and Mrs. William G. Caldwell, 
Ephraim Thomas, Benjamin McNamee, Benjamin Free- 
man, Joel Cook and wife, Mrs. Matthew Johns, Robinson 
Johns and wife, James L. Mason, Eddie Barrett, Mrs. 
Wm. Mitchell, Andrew Hart, Nathaniel Roberts, Elijah 
Tyner, James Tyner, John Foster, James Montgomery, 
Harrison Warrum, Solomon Tyner, John Osborn, George 
Penwell, Robert Cooper, Reuben A. Riley, Parson Fries, 
Richard Hackleman, Adam Allen, Elihu Coffin, J. P. 
Banks, Richard Milbourn, Dr. Howard, Sr., Dr. Espy, 
Thompson Allen, David Stephenson, William Wilkins, 
William Lucas, James Smith, George Troxell, Abram 
Leming, Mark Whitaker, B. B. Clift, Joseph Thomas, 
Hiram Comstock, Joseph Chapman, Mrs. Isaac Roberts, 
Morgan McQiiarey, Daniel Blakely, George Nance, Dr. 
Judkins, Aaron Cass, Perry Wilson, Elijah Reeves, Joseph 
Fort, Lisander Sparks, Robert Eakin, Squire Childers, 
Nevil Reeves, Joshua Shelburn, Daniel Wilkinson, James 
K. King, Jonas Marsh, George Henry, Thomas Craig, 
John Shirley, Shadrach H. Arnett, John Eastes, Isaac 
Snider, Daniel Skinner, B. Purcell, John Dance, John 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 267 

Steel, Samuel Steel, Charles Fish, George Worthington, 
Smith Rodgers, James Burris, Ebenezer Scotten, Wm. 
Smith and wife, Owen Jarrett, Bazil Jay, J. H. Murphy, 
Wyatt Denny, M. Millard, Hiram Crump, Miles Burris, 
O. Eastes, Mrs. John Shelby, Robert Bunton, D. Van- 
guilder, Jeremiah Meek, Joshua Meek, James Hamilton, 
Isaac Willett, Wm. Pierson, Henry Chapman, Wm. 
Justice, John Justice, Benjamin Spellman, Wm. Carr, S. 
B. Jackson, Jared C. Meek, George Tague, William 
Sebastian, William Cushman, T. H. Fry, John Rariden, 
G. Y. Adkinson, W. O. NefF, John Martin, Isaiah Curry, 
Wm. Martindale, David Kingen, Richard Frost, John 
Carr, John Johnson, Jerry Hagan, M. Gosney, Jonathan 
Dunbar, A. Rhue, J. O. G. Collins, Joseph Clayton, 
Wellington Collyer, Marion Forgy, A. H. Trueblood, 
Alexander Akins, James Sample, Robert Binford, Hamil- 
ton J. Dunbar, Asa Gooding and wife, George Muth, 
Wilson Johns, Abram and Elizabeth Johns, John Wolf, 
Thomas Phillips, John Ogg, H. H. Hall, Henry Watts, 
B. Miller, John Henley, William Booth, G. W. Hinton, 
James McKinsey, Samuel Thompson, Samuel Martin, B. 
Gordon, Moses McCall, David Templelon, Richard Guy- 
mon, Owen Griffith, E. Stephenson, George Baity, James 
Judkins, Jonathan Smith, Lot Edwards, Dr. Barnett, 
Morris Pierson, John Brooks, John Caudell, George 
Chappell, Wm. McCord, Elias McCord, George Jackson, 
M. Shull, David Fisher, Jacob Smith, Samuel Henry, 
David and Catherine McNamee, Adam Hawk, Thomas 
Swift and wife, Amos Dickerson, Jonathan Evans, R. W. 
King, S. S. Johnson, Joseph Cones, J. E. Bailey, John 
Delaney, Jacob Murnan, Thomas Leachman, Reuben 
Barnard, Wm. True, Albert Lange, Jacob Schramm, G. 
W. Landis and wife, Wm. Oldham, Enoch Olvey, Wm. 
Amick, the elder Braddock, George Mingle, Thomas 
Ferrell, Llo3d Oftutt, George Dillard, Henry Duncan, 
Wm. Martz, Jordan Lacy, Rev. Miles Walker and scores ot 



268 THE PIONEERS OF 

Others dear to the people of Hancock county. May their 
memory live forever. 

"The world is a looking glass, 

Wherein ourselves are shown, 
Kindness for kindness, cheer for cheer, 
Coldness for gloom, repulse for fear, 

To every soul its own. 
We cannot change the world a whit, 
Only ourselves which look in it." 

WESLEY WILLIAMS, SR. 

This old pioneer of Hancock county, Indiana, was 
born in Wayne count}^, Indiana, May 12, 181 1, son of 
Joseph and Charity (Adams) Williams. Joseph Williams 
was born in Rockingham county, Virginia, Mrs. Williams 
in Stokes county, North Carolina. The famil}- came to 
Wayne county in 1813, when Wesley was about two years 
of age. Wesley Williams was married to Catharine Har- 
din in Wayne county, Indiana, April 10, 1834, ^7 Rev. 
Spoftbrd. She was also born in Wayne county in 1813, 
daughter of Thomas Hardin and Mary Wilson, that being 
her mother's name before marriage. Mr. and Mrs. Hardin 
were also early settlers of old Wayne. 

In 1837 Wesley Williams and wife, soon after mar- 
riage, came to Hancock county, where they have resisded 
since. They came with strong hands, determined to make 
a home. Thev have been successful beyond their then 
expectations. They first entered eighty acres of land, and 
have added to it until they now have over four hundred 
acres of choice land. In 1852, after having spent several 
years in the log cabin, they built a brick house, where they 
lived many years, at that time, and even now, a splendid 
dwelling, where they raised their family, and where they 
spent their best days and entertained their friends without 
number. From a poor beginning in the woods this worthy 
couple become prosperous and influential. No family in 



r MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 269 

the county stands higher than that of Wesley Wilhams. 
Mr. and Mrs. W. joined the M. E. Church in early life, 
and have lived earnest, active christian lives since. 

The following are the names of their children : San- 
ford F., married to Jane Thomas, daughter of David 
Thomas, an earl}' settler of Hancock county. Joseph, 
married to Martha Fort ; deceased ; buried at the Simmons 
cemetery. Charity, married to William Simmons. Thomas, 
married to Lusty Moore. She is deceased. He was again 
married to Cora Hackelman. Thomas was in the war of 
1861-5 ; was severely wounded in ' the hand in battle. 
Debby A., married to Hiram Beaver. All reside in Jack- 
son township. Three other children died in their 30unger 
years. Mr. and Mrs. Williams' parents are buried in 
Wayne county. 

Mr. Williams has been blessed with a strong constitu- 
tion, and has enjoj'ed good health most of his life. At 
this pleasant home and family I am under lasting obliga- 
tions tor favors shown. See Mr. Williams' portrait on 
another page of this work. 

Since this sketch was written, death claimed Wesley 
Williams, who died June 13, 1892. He is buried at the 
Simmons cemetery, Jackson township, where a handsome 
monument has been erected over his remains. She died in 
1895. 

Following will be found a letter written to the Hancock 
Democrat, which explains itself: 

WISHES THEM A HAPPY TIME. 

Anderson, Ind., Feb. 34, 1SS4. 
Editor Democrat : I noticed the proposed celebration 
of the o^olden wedding of Wesley Williams and wife on the 
loth of April next. I would like very much to be there with 
others to congratulate this worthy couple on that interesting 
occasion, and give them a word of cheer on the downward hill 
of life. I call to mind a very pleasant visit at their hospitable 
home a few years ago, and how kindly I \yas entertained, and 



270 THE PIONEERS OF 

listened with interest to their recitals of pioneer life, with the 
struggles with hard times incident to an early frontier life. 
Plenty has come to bless their union after a long life. It is 
fitting that their golden wedding anniversary should be held, 
and allow me in advance to earnestly hope that a good time 
may be had at this meeting. Notwithstanding a long and 
pleasant life has been granted them, there yet remains in the 
coming life many joyous seasons, as the sun sinks in the west 
to rise in that new morning of life, where years are unknown 
and give way to eternity. Samuel Harden. 

JOSEPH WRIGHT. 

Among the grand old men who have lived in Hancock 
county I do not wish to forget Mr. Wright, so long 
connected with the history of Buck-Creek township. He 
was born in Pennsylvania December 27, 1810. He came 
to Ohio with his parents, where he resided a few years. 
Then to Wayne county, Indiana, till the year 1833, where 
he was married to Elizabeth Stephens. Soon after, with 
his little store of worldly goods, he came to Buck-Creek, 
where he lived up to his death, which occurred November 
12, 1891. When Mr. W. came to Hancock county it was 
new and but little to encourage one to make a start in the 
world, but Mr. W. and wife came in the morning of their 
lives, determined to make a home for their old age, and 
everything was put forth to this end. Strong hands and 
willing hearts made their best efforts, and from a little 
opening in the green woods a fine farm was developed, 
and long before his death he had all the comforts of a 
well appointed home. 

He, all through life, was a determined man, zealous in 
what he thought was right and a Democrat all the time. 
A good farmer and citizen, one who was respected in life 
and lamented in death and a Mason of long standing. 
He was a well informed man, a true friend to his coimty 
and a kind friend to all, especially to the poor, w^ho will 
remember him in time to come. He served in all about 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 27 1 

tifteen years as Justice of the Peace. Six children have 
been born to Mr. and Mrs. W., as follows: John W. 
(deceased), Henry, who served eight years as County 
Auditor of Hancock county, and to the entire satisfaction 
ot the people. He was elected in 1872 the first time. 
Isom S., a tiptop man and Mason, has worked on the 
farm most of his lite, but for the past five years he has 
been engaged in keeping store at Mt. Comfort, near the 
old home. Celia, (deceased). Wm. M., who served as' 
deputy under Henry when County Auditor. Mary, mar- 
ried to Mr. Evans; reside near the old farm. Wm. M., 
married to a daughter of Hamilton Welling, of Buck- 
Creek. Isom was never married. 

Following will be found some resolutions passed by 
Oakland Lodge, No. 140, soon after his death: 

IN MEMORY OF BROTHER JOSEPH WRIGHT. 

Brother Joseph Wright was born December 27, iSio, in 
Washington county, Pennsylvania, moved with his father to 
Ohio when about six months old, and from there to Wayne 
county, Indiana, in 1S15, where he resided until he was united 
in marriage to Elizabeth Stevens May 30, 1S33, and moved to 
Buck-Creek township, Hancock county, Indiana, in October, 
1S35, where he resided until death called him hence. Brother 
Wright died at his home November 12, 1891, at 9:30 p. m., 
aged eighty years, ten months and twelve days. 

He was made a Mason in Oakland Lodge, No. 140, March 
24, 1S58, passed to the degree of a Fellowcraft April, 1858, and 
raised to the Sublime degree of a Master Mason May, 1S58. 

The name of Brother Jose25h Wright was interwoven in 
the history of Oakland lodge, upon which he has fixed his im- 
press as indelibly as he had inscribed upon the hearts of the 
members his character and zeal in the cause of Masonry. 

In whatever station he was selected to occupy, the duties 
thereof became his study and watchful care, so that the per- 
formance of them was characterized by ability and earnestness. 
He was a typical Mason, personally interested in the welfare 
of the order everywhere, always cheered and pleased with the 



272 THE PIONEERS OF 

information of its growth, spread and prosperity; while in his 
individual life his daily walk and conversation illustrated in a 
marked degree his adherence to its pure and upright principles 
and honest practices, thus exercising both in the fraternity and 
out an influence for good to be commended by all men and 
Masons, and which shall continue to be felt as long as his vir- 
tues shall be cherished and his name linked in the chain of our 
memories. 

The remains of the deceased brother were interred in the 
Mt. Comfort cemetery on Sunday about noon of November 15, 
1S91. with Masonic honors, amidst a large concourse of citi- 
zens. The body was lowered to rest, the acacia sprigs were 
lovingly bestrewed on the casket, after which our secretary . 
read the Masonic Record. 

Delegations from Fortville Lodge, No. 207, Eden Lodge, 
No. 477, and McCordsville Lodge, No. 501, which attended in 
a body as a lodge, were present and took especial interest in 
paying the last tribute of respect to our deceased brother, and 
lent our lodge substantial assistance. 

Brother Wright was greatly attached to Masonry ; it was 
his pride to labor with zeal in the cause. He was greatly be- 
loved by the members of his own lodge. A tall cedar of 
Lebanon has fallen, a bright and shining light has departed 
from amongst us. Let us cherish his memory and imitate his 
many virtues. We know the great loss we have all sustained ; 
therefore be it 

Resolved, That in the death of Brother Joseph Wright we 
deeply mourn our loss of a true man, a wise counsellor, a re- 
spected and honored citizen, and tender to the bereaved and 
lonely widow and afflicted children our sympathy and 
condolence in this their season of mourning. 

Resolved, That out of respect to the memory of our 
deceased brother, the charter, jewels and working tools be 
draped in mourning for the period of six months. 
Fraternally, 

S. P. Riley, 

Andrew F. Cory, 
Stephen T. Lee, 

Committee. 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 273 

In witness whereof, we hereunto subscribe our names antl 
affix the seal of our lodge at Oakland, Indiana, this c)th clay of 
March, A. L. 5S93, A. D. 1S92. 

William C. Hamilton, W. M. 

HENRY B. WILSON. 

Among the prominent men of Hancock county, Indi- 
ana, I must not forget Mr. Wilson and family, where I was 
so well entertained during the summer just closed. Mr. 
W. has one of the handsomest homes to be found on the 
south bank of Sugar Creek, in Green township, two miles 
south-east of Eden. He has a large, well cultivated farm 
of three or four hundred acres of land, with good buildings 
erected and everything to make home desirable. Mr. 
Wilson was born in Decatur county, Indiana, June 13, 
1824, son of Robert and Nancy (Scott) Wilson. He was 
married to Amanda King, who was born in Bracken 
county, Kentucky, January 16, 1826. They were married 
in Decatur county, Indiana, January 17, 1843. 

Children's names by first marriage : Nancy, married 
to David Loy ; reside in Madison county, Indiana. She 
was born February 12, 1844. Levicy, born April i, 1845 ; 
married to Joseph Osborn ; reside in Tipton county, Indi- 
ana. James W., born in 1847 ; married to Martha Johnson. 
He died in Greenfield, Indiana, October 25, 1891. He 
was for many 3^ears a clerk in Greenfield and an accom- 
plished business man, and a Mason of high standing ; is 
buried at Greenfield. Isaac, born April 10, 1848 ; married 
to Blanch Haas ; reside near Warrington, Indiana, Rachel 
L., born October 27, 1849; iTiai"i"i^d to David H. Beaty ; 
reside one and a half miles east of Eden. Sarah A., born 
October 13, 1851 ; married to Jasper N. Moulden ; reside 
in Greenfield. Mary E., born January 13, 1853 ; married 
to George Owen; reside in Green township. Martha E., 
born March, 1854 ' married to William A. Dunn ; reside 
near Mt. Comfort. Lucian B., born September 12, 1857. 
16 



274 '^^'^ PIONEERS OF 

He died October 6, 1865 ; is buried, at Willow Branch. 
Selicia O., born December 6, 1859; rTi^iiied to William 
Lettro ; reside near Cambridge City, Indiana. Matilda J., 
born, 1862 ; married to Elmer E. Stoner ; reside in Green- 
field. Elmer G., born July 6, 1865; married to Clara 
Johnson. She is deceased ; buried at Simmons cemetery. 
He was the second time married to Mag Stouder. Joseph 
E., born May 8, 1867 ; married to Ida Trees ; reside near 
Warrington. 

Mrs. Wilson died November 22, 1870 ; is buried at the 
Willow Branch cemetery. A grand, good woman, and the 
mother ot twelve children. She was a member of the M. 
E. Church, and died respected by all who knew her. 

Mr. Wilson was the second time married to Nancy C. 
Dunn, November 26, 1871. She is the daughter of Abner 
Dunn, one of the pioneers of Buck-Creek township. She 
was born there, November i, 1839. Children's names by 
second marriage: Ermie G., born September 18, 1872; 
at home. John L., born April 29, 1875. Kate D., born 
January 21, 1877. Henry B., born November 16, 1881. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wilson are both members of the M. E. 
Church, Mr. W. since he was fifteen years of age, filling 
many places of trust and responsibility in so long a time. 
He has been a citizen of Green township since 1853, and 
all that time one of its active men. He has served four 
years as Trustee, and in 1892 was a candidate for County 
Treasurer in the primary convention, but was defeated a few 
votes by the Hon. G. W. Ham. But few men of Hancock 
county is better known than Mr. Wilson, and no man 
stands higher. At home he is almost to a fault sociable ; 
no person passes his house cold or hungry ; no object but 
gets his support if wortlw. He is a devoted christian, and 
strongly welded to the M. E. Church, as well as the Dem- 
ocratic partes in both of which he is a strong, influential 
man. He joined the Masonic order manv years ago at 
Pendleton, Indiana, and is now a member of Edtn Lodge, 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 275 

No. 477- In person Mr. W. is six feet high, fair complex- 
ion, fair hair, quick, active temperament, quick to act and 
quick to forgive. The four older children were born in 
Decatur county, Indiana, the others in Hancock county. 

JOHN FORGEY. 

This old and highly esteemed citizen of Hancock 
county, Indiana, was born in Virginia on the nth day of 
May, 1801, and on the 8th day of January, 1837, he was 
married to Lucinda Sprouce. She was born in Lawrence 
county, Ohio, March 27, 1816. In 184 1 the family came 
to Green township, Hancock county, Indiana, where they 
resided many years and where they were raised and where 
the onl}^ survivor now resides. Miss Electa J., who resides 
on the old farm. John Forgey died January i, 1883. Mrs. 
Forgey died November 21, 1866; both buried at the Cook 
cemetery, in Green township, with the rest of the family 
except Andrew and Hugh. 

The following are the names of John Forgey's family : 
Benjamin, born January 12, 1838; died at the age of 
sixteen years ; buried at the Cook cemetery. Andrew 
was in Company G, Twelfth Indiana Volunteers, and was 
wounded at Resaca, Georgia, on the 13th day of May, 
1863 ; died three days later and is buried there. He was 
in his twenty-fourth year of age. Mary, be rn May 11, 
1841 ; died November 11, 1882 ; died at the age of forty- 
one years ; is buried at the Cook cemetery. She was 
never married. Electa J., born December 20, 1842. 
Hugh was also in the army, Company G, Twelfth Indiana 
Volunteers, and was wounded at Resaca, Georgia, on the 
13th day of May, 1863, and died of wounds June 9, 1863 ; 
is buried at Nashville, Tennessee. He was born April 14, 
1839. ^^ ^'^^ twenty-one years of age. Two grand 
young men, both wounded the same day and died within 
six weeks of each other, and buried in a strange land. 
William J., died at the age of nineteen years ; is buried at 



276 THE PIONEERS OF 

the Cook cemetery. Ann E., born January 22, 1859; 
died May 22, 1864, at the age of live years. Eliza O., 
married to Daniel F. Hayes. She died at the age of 
twenty-eight years ; is bm-ied at the Hayes cemetery, in 
Brown township, Hancock covmty, Indiana. She was 
born May 21, 185 1 ; died September 6, 1874. 

Mr. and Mrs. Forgey were pioneers. They came to 
the county when it was new and worked hard to get a 
start. They succeeded well and plenty came to bless 
them. They lived highly respected and died lamented by 
their friends. Mrs. Forgey was a member of the M. E. 
Church. 

I am indebted to Miss Electa J. for the foregoing his- 
tory of her family, which came very near being lost. 
JOHN G. SERVICE. 

This old pioneer first looked out on this beautiful 
world in Butler county, Ohio, on the 15th day of Decem- 
ber, 1830; came to Indiana in 1837. On April 27, 1856, 
he was married to Margaret A. Fry. 

Children's names: Emil}^ J. William F., who died 
at the age of six years. He is buried at the Little Sugar- 
Creek cemetery. Sarah E., deceased ; is buried at Mt. 
Lebanon cemetery. She was married to W. M. Leming. 
George W., Phebe A., Jerusha B., Daniel W., Mary J., 
Daisy J. and Doll. 

Mr. Service has served as Trustee of Brandywine 
township for ten years. He was elected as a Democrat, 
and is now (1895) acting with that grand old party. He 
lives five miles south-west of Greenfield, Indiana, where 
he has lived many years, and where he is held in high 
esteem by all who know him. Mr. S., in his wa}^, is a 
quiet citizen, fairly well posted on the affairs of the 

country. 

ILA STEELE. 

Mr. Steele was born in Rush county, Indiana, May 
31, 1832, son of James Steele, who came to Hancock 



Madison and hancock counties. 277 

county, Indiana, in 1838, and was accidentally killed on 
the land he entered January 31, 1839, ^"^ where Ila Steele 
now resides, in Jackson township, near Willow Branch. 
Mrs. Ila Steele, formerly Miss Hollida}^ was born October 
14, 1834, ^^ Fayette county, Indiana. Her father's name 
was Frisby Holliday. Her mother's name was Elizabeth 
Bridges. Mr. Steele's mother died January 12, 1864. 

Following are the names of Ila Steele's children : 
Sarah J., born February 5, 1861 ; died February 24, 1868; 
buried at Simmons cemetery. William D., born Septem- 
ber II, 1864; married Ora Nelson; died May 14, 1868; 
buried at Simmons cemetery. Another child, born March 
22, 1867. Minnie M., born July 29, 1872 ; at home and 
an accomplished young lady. 

Mr. Steele stands deservedly high in Hancock county, 
where he is well known as an honest man. He has lived 
here on his farm fifty years, and no one doubts his word 
for a minute. He is a Democrat from away back, and he 
and his wife belong to the Christian church. Mrs. 
Steele's father died November 10, 1859; ^^ buried at the 
Harlan cemetery. 

OBEDIAH O. HARVEY. 

Mr. H. was born in Franklin count}', Indiana, 
November, 1822, son of William and Jane (Eastus) 
Harvey. O. O. Harvey came to Buck-Creek township in 
1849, where he has since lived, and from first to last has 
been one of its best citizens, always taking great interest 
in all improvements in his locality, and at all times ready 
to help develop its best interests. On the 28th day of 
February, 1850, he was married to Parmelia Craig, daugh- 
ter of the late Thomas Craig, one of the pioneers of Buck 
Creek. 

Following are the names of Mr. and Mrs. Harvey's 
children: W. T., married Mary Russell, second time to 
Louisa Allen ; reside in Buck Creek. His first wite is 



278 THE PIONEERS OF 

buried at the Eastus cemetery. Sampson D., married to 
Miss A. McCord ; reside in Tipton, Indiana. He is a fine 
artist. Sarah J., married to John C. Eastus, a progressive 
farmer of Buck Creek. Andrew M., married Miss L3^dia 
Lancaster ; reside in Indianapolis. Ella, married to 
William G. Hopkins, in Carthage, Indiana. Everett B., 
married to Catherine M. McGee. Annie M., married to 
Charles S. Bell; reside at home (1892). Their first child 
was born April 18, 1850 ; second child, August 27, 1851 ; 
third child, December 11, 1852; fourth child, December 
22, 1855 ; fifth child, December 25, 1865 ; sixth child, 
August 30, 1863 ; seventh child, May 30, 1871. 

Mr. Harvey served eight years as Township Trustee 
of Buck Creek, showing his popularity among his friends 
and neighbors. He is of a quiet make-up, yet firm in his 
likes and dislikes, loves home and its quiet, and has made 
a fine farm out of the green woods that surrounded him 
when he first settled there in 1849. While gathering ma- 
terial for this work I was a guest at their home and was 
well entertained by this pioneer family. Mr. H. is a 
Democrat, but is not a member of any church. Long 
may this worthy couple live to enjoy their pleasant home. 
In person Mr. H. is a large, square built man, of light 
complexion and hair. He has been a strong, active man, 
and for years worked at blacksmithing in connection with 
farming. 

ABNER SMITH. 

The Smith family must be noticed in the Pioneer, and 
Abner and family are good representatives of this, and 
count a large family. Mr. Smith resides one mile north- 
east of Philadelphia, Hancock county, Indiana, on the 
National road, where he owns near one thousand acres of 
land, a splendid house, and barns almost without number. 
Abner was born in Hancock county, August 31, 1831, son 
of Josiah Smith. His mother's name was Elizabeth Burris. 
Abner Smith was married to Martha Griffith, daughter of 



MADISON And HANCOCK COUNTIES. 2^^ 

Owen Griffith. Her mother's name was Margaret Camp- 
bell ; married November 20, 1851, by Joseph Marshall. 

Their children's names are as follows : John M., born 
in 1852 ; resides just east of Philadelphia. He was married 
to Eldora A. Hauk, December 22, 1881. Margaret J., born 
August 15, 1857 ; married to Leander Bowhard ; reside on 
the old homestead. 

Mr. Smith is a Republican. Josiah Smith died in 
1835. Mrs. Elizabeth Smith died June 19, 1884. Both 
buried on Buck Creek. Owen Griffith died April, 1865. 
Mrs. Margaret Griffith died December, 1878. Both buried 
near Philadelphia. 

It gives me pleasure to give this family a sketch in my 
work. 

JOHN CRIST. 

Mr. Crist was born in Montgomery count}^ Ohio, 
March 31, 1829, and was married to Malissa Mingle June 
17, 1855. She was also born in Montgomery county, 
Ohio, on the 14th day of August, 1827. She died July 
22, 1888 ; buried at the Menden cemetery in Madison 
county, Indiana. She was a member of the United 
Brethren Church. Mr. Crist is a staunch Democrat of 
the olden type, and a man that stands deservedly high in 
Hancock county, his home, as well as other places where 
he is known. He owns a fine farm in Green township, 
where he has erected a fine brick house and other com- 
fortable buildings. He is known as a good farmer and 
stock raiser all over the county. 

The following are his children's names: Jasper M., 
married to Gertrude Umbenhour. George, married to 
Nancy Gwynn. " Mar^^ M., married to Edward Shell. 
Amanda E., married to H. Rothemer, and Jacob, single. 
All reside in Hancock county, Indiana. 

In person Mr. Crist is tall and of dark complexion. 
I have often partaken of their hospitality, for which I am 
duly thankful. Mrs. Crist is a sister of George, Henr}^, 




ANDREW JACKSON. MRS. ANDREW JACKSON. 




WILLIAM JOHNS. 



MRS. WILLIAM JOHNS. 



MADISON AND MANCOCk COUNTIES. 201 

John, Peter and Adam Mingle and Mrs. Eastly Holmes, 
Mrs. Conrad Kinneman and Mrs. Moses C. Cook. 
Mr. Crist is a son of Michael Crist, who died in 
Hancock county, Indiana, on the 9th da}^ of May, 
1 85 1. He is buried at the Menden cemetery in Madison 
county. Mrs. Crist's father, George Mingle, died also in 
Hancock county in 1840 ; is also buried at the Menden 
cemetery in Madison county. Mr. Crist joined the 
Masonic Lodge, No. 477, at Menden, Indiana, in 1877. 

HON. JOHN ADDISON. 

It gives me great pleasure to place the above gentle- 
man's name in the Pioneer. While canvassing for the 
History of Hancock County I first got acquainted with 
him, in 1880, and from first to last have found him the 
same consistent christian gentleman. I have often been 
at his home, near Charlottesville, and partaken of his hos- 
pitality, which is of a genuine character. No man or 
family stands higher than Mr. Addison's. 

Following will be found a sketch of the Addison fam- 
ily by Mrs. Ada F. Thornburg, which will be read with 
interest by all, especially those who are acquainted with 
them. This sketch is so full that it leaves but Httle to say 
further. See his portrait on another page : 

Charlottesville, Ind. 
One of the grandest men of my acquaintance is my dear 
old father, John Addison, an old residenter of Hancock county, 
Indiana. For my part I think there never was a more true or 
faithful man ever lived. He was born on January 23, 1S20, 
near Richmond, Preble county, Ohio, and at the age of seven 
years he and his parents moved to Rush county, Indiana. He 
is the oldest child of John and Sarah Addison, formerly of 
Randolph county. North Carolina. He and his father devel- 
oped a farm out of the native green. He remained at home 
with his parents until he was twenty years old. He was mar- 
ried to Miss Nancy Hall, daughter of Curtis Hall, an old and 



2^2 TriE PldNEERS OF 

respected citizen of Henry county, Indiana, on the 13th of 
February, 1S40. Siiortly after his marriage he moved to Han- 
cock county, where he has resided ever since, on his farm, one 
and a half miles north of Charlottesville. Of this union nine 
children were born, five girls and four boys, as follows : 

Delinda J., the oldest child, married C, H. Fort, ex-County 
Treasurer. Lavina E., married William F. Lakin (deceased). 
Temperance E. married James F. McClarnon. Samuel M. 
married Miss Lizzie Wilson. Curtis N, died while young. 
Silas E., died Februry 23, 1878. He had devoted the last five 
years of his life to the ministry of the Christian Church. 
Joseph N. married Miss Florence Burke. Mary F. married 
John W. Wales Sarah M. died in infancy. 

On November 24, 1866, death entered and took the wife 
and mother. He was again" married, January 9, 188S, to Miss 
Ellen J. Coltrain, of Lewisville, Henry county, Indiana. The 
fruits of this union was one daughter, Ada F., who married 
Mr. Thornburg, 1895. He is also the father of an adopted son, 
who is married and living near Charlottesville. He was elected 
Treasurer of Hancock county in 1861. In the winter of 1868 
he was elected to the Legislature. In 1873 he was elected 
County Commissioner, and held the office for six years. He 
has been a strong Democrat all his life, casting his first vote for 
James K. Polk, in 1844. He has been a faithful member of the 
Christian Church for about fifty-two years. His children all 
live on farms of their own, the fartherest one not living over 
five miles from the old home. He can say what many men can 
not, and that is, that all of his sons, son-in-law, daughters and 
daughters-in-law are members of the Christian Church. He 
is the grandfather of thirty-five children and seven great grand- 
children. Ada F. Thornburg. 

^ EDWARD H. BARRETT. 

Among the grand old pioneers of Hancock county I 
do not wish to forget Edward H. Barrett, of Green town- 
ship, where he, out of the green woods, carved out one of 
the best farms in the county. He was born in Cabbie 
county, Virginia, November 26, 1814, and is, the very 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 28^ 

day I write this, seventy-seven years of age. He was 
married to Mury A. Reeves June 17, 1841. She is the 
daughter of Ihi and Fannie Reeves, of Rush county, 
Indiana. Mrs. Barrett was born in Brown county, Ohio, 
June 27, 1823. Soon after their marriage they came to 
Green township, where Mr. B. had previously entered a 
part of his now splendid farm. He entered his land in 
1834. They know all about pioneer life, and the toil and 
privation incident thereto. But from little has sprung 
plenty, as it always will where frugality and hard work are 
practiced. Little by little the clearing in the woods 
widened out, school-houses and churches came, with good 
roads and other improvements unknown when they settled 
in Green township, and to-day this grand old couple can 
look back over tiie past fifty years and note the changes 
that have taken place, some of a pleasant nature, some of 
a sorrowing nature. While time brings good cheer and 
happiness, it also brings sorrow. Deep sorrow came to 
them in the death of their son, Ila J., who died June 7, 
1854, j^^s^ ^^ ^^^^ flush of full manhood. They have only 
one other child, Benton L., waio is living with the "old 
folks at home." 

This home is, if one might judge from surroundings, 
one of the most pleasant anywheie to be foimd. Pleas 
antly located, with good buildings, fruit, and everything 
that comfort could suggest. Previous to his marriage Mr. 
B. worked at carpentering for several years ; also worked 
on the National road about 1836-38. He is well informed 
on all subjects, having been a constant reader, though 
now (1891) deprived of this by weak eyes. His mind is 
vigorous and active. He is a Democrat of long standing 
of the Jackson school. Mrs. B. is a well preserved lady, 
a hale, handsome woman of her age (1895). 

Benton L., their son, is just in the prime of life, well 
informed and a good, practical farmer. He is a splendid 
penman, and a letter from him is a model of beauty in 



284 THE PIONfeERS 6V 

composition and penmanship that but few can equal, an 
accompHshment worthy any one to attain. 

Following will be found a sketch of his life, published 
at the time of his death, taken from the Hancock Demo- 
crat, which I gladly append to the above. He has a 
handsome monument erected lo his memory in the 
Knightstown cemetery : 

EDWARD H. BARRETT NO MORE IN THIS LIFE. 

Editor Democrat : In last week's issue of the Democrat 
a very brief mention was made of the death of Edward H. 
Barrett, of Green township, in this county, but I think the 
mention was much too brief to do justice to such a man, and by 
your permission I will more fully speak of one of the noblest 
of the old citizens of this county. 

Edward H. Barrett was born in Cabell county, West Vir- 
ginia, November 26, 1S14, and died in Hancock county, 
Indiana, February 21, A. D. 1892, aged seventy-seven years 
and nearly three months. He located in Hancock county in 
the year 1834, and was intermarried with Mary Ann Reeves in 
1841, a noble woman, who still survives him. They had two 
children, Ila J. Barrett, who died in 1864, and Benton L. Bar- 
rett, who still survives him. In politics he was a lifelong 
Democrat, in fact as well as in name, because he believed in its 
general principles and not for office. He was never a candidate 
for any office, although frequently strongly solicited to allow 
the use of his name. He was often a delegate and a commit- 
teeman, but would have nothing more. He was an independent 
thinker, and kept his conscience in politics as in all things else. 
He was a lifelong farmer and a good one, and much given to 
hospitality. His house was for many years headquarters for 
all public men visiting in that locality. He and his excellent 
wife never permitted any to go away hungry, nor would they 
receive any remuneration. The entertainment was of the best, 
as they were generous to a fault. 

He was truly one of nature's noblemen, honest in all 
things, fair and liberal in his views, sincere and true in his 
friendships, and just in all things. For many years his influ- 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 285 

ence and counsels had an influence for good in neighborhoods. 
He united with the M. E. Church in 1845, and thereafter Uved 
and died a faithful member. A good man, a kind husband and 
father, a good citizen, a true believer in Jesus and the 
resurrection has crossed the great river. The deadly " grip," 
which has killed so many old people during the winter, at last 
proved too much for him. When the last trial had come, and 
at the last moment, after his last breath seemed to be gone, 
when surrounded by his family and friends, he seemed to fully 
comprehend that death had come, his last words were, " I am 
gone." Farewell, old friend. 

An Old Friend of Fifty Years. 

JUDA A. BABCOCK. 

Among the active young men of Hancock county, 
Indiana, I wish to write of the one whose name heads this 
short sketch, who is located at Willow Branch, and work- 
ing at his trade, blacksmithing. He has been there since 
1883. Mr. Babcock was born September 25, 1856. That 
was a good year, the year I was married, the year James 
Buchanan was elected President, and no doubt the date of 
many other notable events. He was married to Hannah 
Smith, September 10, 1876, so if he had waited fifteen 
days he would have been twenty years old. Mrs. B. was 
born in Virginia, May 5, 1855. Both members of the M. 
E. Church at the Branch. 

Mr. Babcock is a fine mechanic, both in wood and iron, 
and can make a wagon from beginning to end, or a plow ; 
in fact, anything in that line. He deserves the patronage 
of the people, which he has. I trust the ring of his anvil 
will be heard many days hence at Willow Branch. 

In 1892 Mr. B. erected a large and commodious shop 
in the south part of town, in which he has ample room for 
his fast growing trade. 

GEORGE W. PARKER. 

I could hardly issue this work without remembering 
Mr. Parker, one of the solid men of Buck-Creek township, 



286 THE PIONEERS OF 

Hancock county, Indiana, who resides two miles north of 
Philadelphia, where he owns a splendid farm of near five 
hundred acres of land. Always active and foremost in 
every good work of his county, why should I overlook 
him. He was born in Hancock county, November 13, 
1842, son of John and Isabel (Forsythe) Parker, early set- 
tlers of this locality. He was married to Mary C. Coleman, 
January 7, 1866, daughter of Alfred and Rebecca Coleman. 
Children's names: Clinton, married to Hattie Brown; 
Dora A., one of the bright teachers of Hancock county; 
Mary J., William and George H. 

Mr. Parker is one of the best farmers in the county, 
and has all the improved machinery on his well cultivated 
farm. He started out in life poor, but with strong and 
willing hands to try to succeed, assisted by his worthy 
wife. Success has crowned their best efl:brts in life. Mr. 
Parker, besides attending to his own business so success- 
fully, has often been called to public duties, and in the 
highest places. He was elected Justice in 1872, Trustee in 
1880 and County Commissioner in 1882, serving in all some 
sixteen years, to the entire satisfaction of all. He was 
chosen to fill the above offices as a Democrat, with a big 
D. He entered Uncle Sam's service in Company B, Ninth 
Indiana Cavalry, December 3, 1863, Colonel G. W. Jack- 
son, Captain William R. Walls. Was in man}^ hard 
fought battles, such as Nashville, Franklin, Columbia, 
Pulaski, Springfield, etc. Was discharged at Vicksburg, 
Mississippi, August 28, 1865. Mr. P. is also a member of 
the Hancock County Fire Insurance Company, and of 
Dunbar Post, G. A. R. Mrs. Parker is a worthy lady, 
though retired in her ways. She was born August 4, 1844. 

You will find Mr. Parker's portrait on another page of 
this work. Thanks to this family for favors shown while 
getting material for the Pioneer. 

JAMES R. BRADDOCK. 

Among the prominent men of Hancock county I do 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 287 

not wish to forget Mr. Braddock, who resides in Jackson 
township, one mile south-west of Willow Branch, on the 
I., B. & W. Railroad. He was born in Hancock county, 
Indiana, July 8, 1835, ^^^ ^f Moses and Nancy (Ring- 
land) Braddock, who were early settlers on Brandywine, 
where they are buried near where they first settled. Mr. 
Braddock enlisted in Company I, Third Indiana Cavahy. 
He was in several hard-fought battles and was wounded. 
He was discharged on the 8th day of June, 1865, at 
Greensboro, North Carolina. 

Early in life he studied medicine, but never practiced, 
farming being his chosen avocation, in which he has been 
very successt'ul. He owns a fine farm, and, in 1891, erected 
the best house in Jackson township, and the strangest 
thing is, he has no one to share this mansion. He is a 
Republican, but not of that offensive kind, but rather one 
who allows others to think and act for themselves. He is 
a constant reader and has a fine library, both medical and 
miscellaneous. He is of dark complexion, dark eyes, a 
good talker, and, withal, a very complete gentleman. He 
is a brother of Henry, Noah, William and Sarah Brad- 
dock. 

ELDER DAVID CAUDELL. 

Mr. C. was born in Clermont count}-, Ohio, July 13, 
1817, son of John and Susannah Caudell. Mrs. C.'s name 
before marriage was Susannah Thomas. They came to 
Hancock county, Indiana, October, 1834, ^" vv^hat is now 
Vernon township, one mile east of Fortville. Here the 
elder Caudell entered eighty acres of land. He died Sep- 
tember 22, 1837, ^^^ ^^ buried at the Simmons cemetery, 
near the land he entered, if not on it. Susannah Caudell 
died February, 1858, and is buried at the same cemetery. 
David Caudell was married to Hannah Smith, November 
9, 1836. She died August i, 1870, and is buried at the 
Simmons cemetery. She joined the Baptist Church when 
quite young, and was a grand, good woman all through 



288 THE PIONEERS OF 

life. She, with her husband, came early to this then new 
county, where their best efforts were put forth in getting a 
home and raising a family. 

Their children's are as follows : Elisha, born in 1838 ; 
married to Emily J. Martin; reside in Hamilton county, 
Indiana. Martha, died at the age of two years. Mar}^, 
married to' William R. Branson; died, February, 1881. 
Henry J., married to Mary Lake; reside in Hamilton 
county, Indiana. John F., married to Miss L. Bolander ; 
reside in Indianapolis. Hannah J., married to Francis F. 
Cobb; reside in Hamilton county, Indiana. Daniel W., 
married to Miss E. Pile ; reside in Fortville. Rhoda, died 
in infancy ; buried at the Simmons cemetery. Sarah 
E., married John D. DeAlty ; reside on the home farm. 
Jacob W., married to Anna V. Dunbar; reside in Indian- 
apolis. Hiram D., single. 

David Caudell was the second time married to Eliza- 
beth LaMay, September 29, 1871. She died, August 19, 
1890, and is buried at the Gilboa cemetery, in Hancock 
county. She was a member of the Baptist Church, and 
held in high esteem among her friends. Mr. Caudell was 
ordained a Baptist minister in June, 1855 ; elected County 
Commissioner in 1869 ; served one-term ; served four years 
as Trustee. He has forty-four grandchildren ; all vote the 
Democratic ticket. Mr. C. voted for VanBuren in 1836, 
and has voted at all the Presidential elections since, and 
Democratic all the time. 

Mr. Caudell is among the foremost men in the county, 
always first in every good word and work. He is in per- 
son full six feet high, strong, and, when in full manhood, a 
powerful man ; an able speaker, and is well known in 
Indiana, as well as other States. 

Mr. Caudell's father was in the war of 181 2, and his 
grandfather in the war of 1776, and voted for George 
Washincjton for President the first time he was elected. 

Since the above was written Mr. Caudell was married 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 289 

to Mrs. Eliza M. Willis, February 11, 1892. Her maiden 
name was Eliza M. Higginbotham. She was born in 
Clermont county, Ohio, November 2, 1824 ; married to 
Robert Willis, August 18, 1852. He died, May 18, 1884; 
is buried at the Bennett cemetery, in Hancock county. 
Mrs. Caudell joined the Baptist Church in 1840. 

MATTHEW JOHNS. . 

This old son of Vulcan was born in Granger count}', 
Tennessee, April 16, 181 7, just one year younger than his 
adopted State (Indiana), son of Henr}'^ Johns, of Pennsyl- 
vania. Matthew came to Indiana in 1832 and settled in 
HancQck count}-, where he haa lived up to date (1895). 
He came the year the stars fell, and has seen them fall 
often since in more ways than one, for if there ever was a 
man that has seen more of real lite than Matthew I have 
never seen him. He early learned the blacksmith trade, 
and has pounded more iron than any man in the county. 
At the midright hour, after all was quiet, he was at the 
forge. Sparks flew to the right and left till morn was 
ushered in, and to-day, after going through untold hard- 
ships and toil, he is one of the solid men of Brown 
township, where he has lived so long and where he stands 
high as an honorable man. He was married to Ellen 
Margard on the 23d day of April, 1843. She was born in 
Montgomery county, Indiana, March 14, 1822. She died 
March 30, 1886 ; buried at the Simmons cemetery in 
Hancock county, Indiana. 

The following are the names of their children : 
Henry, born January 24, 1844 ; married to Sarah J. Coon ; 
reside in Brown township. John, born August 5, 1845 ; 
deceased June 16, 1876. Mar}- A., born February i, 
1849; married to Elisha Burris. Maria, married to Abram 
Burris. William P., born March i, 1855; married to 
Mary L. Davis first time, second time to Nancy J. Noland. 
Louisa, born February 19, 1853 ; married to William 
^7 



290 THE PIONEERS OF 

Slaughter. Nancy, married to Alexander Bridges. 
David, died young, November 19, 1848. Anderson, mar- 
ried to Jane Jones, second time to Miss Burgess. Eliza- 
beth E., married to Charles Nibarger, who died June 16, 
1882; buried at the Harlan cemetery. Sarah J., died in 
infancy, November 29, 1867. 

Mr, Johns was married the second time to Elizabeth 
J. Freel May 19, 1887. She was born in Hamilton county, 
Indiana, May i, 1830, daughter of George Reddick. She 
was first married to Sylvester Fisher January 6, 1848. 
He died January 24, 1864. She was married the second 
time to William Freel December 15, 1870. He died in 
October, 1878. 

Mr. Johns is an old-time Democrat, owns a splendid 
farm and enjo3'^s life as well as the best. He was severely 
hurt a few years ago, from which he is quite lame. I will 
never forget the kind treatment received from Mr. and 
Mrs. Johns at their home in Brown township, Hancock 
county, Indiana. 

ANDREW FINK. 

Mr. Fink resides in one of the handsomest places in 
Hancock county, in Buck-Creek township, where he has 
lived all his life. He was born October 30, 1851, son of 
Henry Fink. His mother's name before marriage was 
Louisa Miller. He was married to Christina Miller on 
February 28, 1878. She was born on February 10, 1857. 
Children's names are as follows : John, Walter, Henr}^ A. 
and Charles. 

Mr. Fink is serving his second term as Trustee of 
Buck-Creek township, having been first elected in 1888, 
and re-elected in 1890. Mr. and Mrs. Fink belong to the 
Evangelical Church. Mr. F. was elected Trustee as a 
Democrat, and is one of the foremost farmers in his locality. 
He has a fine residence and other good surroundings, and 
his farm shows that he is a good farmer. In person Mr. 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 29I 

Fink is six leet high, strong, athletic, and in the prime of 

life. 

BENJAMIN ELLIOTT. 

In Philadelphia you will tind Mr. Elliott working at 
the blacksmithing business. He was born in Pike county, 
Ohio, August 14, 1839, and came to his present location in 
1870. He was married to Annie Welling, daughter of 
Hamilton Welling, one of tlie early settlers of Buck-Creek 
township, Hancock county, Indiana. They were married 
March, 1865. She was born in Buck-Creek township in 
1842. 

Children's names: Ernest R., born July 16, 1871: 
married to Esther Fields. Inez, born July lO, 1873 ; mar- 
ried to Edward Klem ; reside in New Castle, Indiana. 

Mr. Elliott enlisted in Company I, Eighth Indiana 
Volunteers, at Greenfield, under Captain Reuben A. Riley, 
in the three months' service ; discharged at Indianapolis. 
He again enlisted in Company D, Thirty-eighth Indiana 
Volunteers, and was in the battles of Chickamauga, Nash- 
ville and Strawberr}' Plains ; then back to Nashville, then 
to Washington City and New Orleans ; v^as discharged at 
Indianapolis, July 3, 1865. He is a member of William E. 
Hart Post, G. A. R., at Gem. Mr. E, is a good workman, 
as he was a good soldier ; is a Republican. I am glad to 
give him a notice in the Pioneer. Mrs. Elliott is a member 
of the M. E. Church. 

HON. JOHN H. WHITE. 

I hardly know what to write about Mr. White, one 
who has lived in the county so long and filled numerous 
places with credit to all. He was born in Preble county, 
Ohio, December 3, 1824. He came to Shelby county, 
Indiana, in 1842, where he taught school many years. He 
came to Hancock county in 1853, where he now (i8g^) 
resides, tour miles south-west ot the city of Greenfield. 
He was married to Sarah Potts, December 23, 1845. She 



292 'I'lii': ri()Ni':i-:RS oi'- 

was born in I'^ranklin county, Indiana, in 1822. She died, 
February 2, iScS.j.. A j^rand, ^ood woman, and a member 
of the Christian Church ; is buried at Mt. Lebanon ceme- 
tery, east oC the ohl home. 

The Ibhowing are the names of their chikhen : J. Q; 
and Wilham T. (twins), born July 16, 1847 ; Shadrach 13., 
Fries M., James A,, Steplien G., Berry W., Henry D., 
deceased, February 7, 1861 ; buried at Mt. Lebanon cem- 
etery ; Mary J., married to John T. Duncan. 

Mr. White lias served as Trustee, was President of the 
Hancock Comity Fire Insurance Company lor years, and 
President of the Hancock County Agricultural Society, as 
well as Director and stockholder ; was a member of the 
Indiana Ivcgislature from 1864 to 1866; served with credit 
in all the above ollices ; elected as a Democrat. Mr. W. 
was raised an orjihan, and by industry has risen to the 
high position lie liolds to-day. I le owns a line farm, which 
has been his pride to cultivate, and is always foremost to 
introduce machinery of the best kind on it. He has always 
been in fiivor of free schools and good roads ; in fact, any- 
thing that goes to make up a progressive farmer and good 
citizen. Though never a member of church, he is what 
we might call a free thinker, great reader, and a splendid 
fire-side comjianion. Glad to give this family due notice 
in the Pioneer. 

HON. JOHN Q. WIHTK, 

Son of the Hon. Jolin H. White, was born in Frank- 
lin county, Indiana, July 16, 1847. He was brought up on 
a farm, and was quite young when his father came to 
Hancock county, in 1853. He was united in marriage to 
Sarah J. Service, July 14, 1873. She died. May 12, 1881, 
and is buried at Mt. Lebanon cemetery ; was a member of 
the M. P. Church. 

The following are the names of [\\v chiUlren by this 
marriage: Laura B., born June 9, 1875; married to O. 
11. Wood, August 6, 1893. S. M., born May 28, 1878. 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTriCS. 293 

Mr. W. was a^aiii married to Mrs. Mary Jiidd, July 10, 
1882. One child was born by this marriage, Thomas C, 
October 22, 1884. Mrs. White's maiden name was Ilolli- 
day, dauf^diter ol' h'risby and KH/abeth Ilollichiy. JShe 
was born January 29, 1848, near Warrington, Indiana. 

Mr. White has served as Justice lour years, Director 
for his township for tiie I lancock County 'I^'ire Insurance 
Company, and vSecrelary ol' the F. M. H. A. lie was 
elected to tin- Indiana Legislatme, NovemhcM", i8(;.|, Cor 
the county ol llancoik, in which cajKicity he served with 
credit to all. lie is a lliorough Democrat, and a well 
inlormed gentleman. Me owns a good farm, four miles 
south-west ol the city ol (jreenlield. 

WILLIAM A. MILIUJKN. 

Among the |>rominent c:iti/.ens ol Ilaneock county I 
do not want to forget Mr. Milburn, who has sjient nearly 
all his life here, having been brought from Virginia by his 
parents when less than two years old. I le was born in 
V^irginia, December 28, 1834, ^"" "^ ^'^*^' ^•^^^' '^i^-'haid Mil- 
burn, one of the lirst residents of JJrandywinc; townshij"). 
I lis mother's name was Caroline Andis. IJolh buried at 
the Mt. Lebanon cemetery. William A. was reared on a 
farm, and this has b(!en his occupation, togetlu^r with 
stock-raising, in both of wliicii he has been eminently 
successful. lie now has ni;ar one th()usand aires of land, 
three miles south of Gri;enlield, where he has erected a 
line dwelling and everything to make home attractive and 
convenient. lie was married to Mary C Comstock on 
August 12, 1867. She was born on February 28, 1848, 
daughter of James and Catharine (Judy) Comstock. 

""I'he following are the; names (jf Mr. and Mrs. Milburn's 
children: John L., born October 25, 1869. Mattie C, 
born March 7, 1873. Charles R., born January 5, 1876. 
All born in Ilaneock t:ounty, Indiana, and all single and 
at houK;. 



294 



THE PIONEERS OF 



Mrs. Milburn is a member of the M. E. Church, and 
a sister of Warren Comstcck, a prominent man in the same 
locahty. She is an accomphshed lady, and, as she says, 
turns no one away from her hospitable home, as I knocked 
at the door one night, tired and hungry. These are grand 
words, and were fully appreciated by me. Mr. M. is a 
Democrat of the olden time. He is a brother of the late 
Leonadas Milburn, of the same township. 
EDWARD P. SCOTT. 

Mr. Scott was born in Fayette county, Indiana, March 
27, 1832, five miles north-west of Connersville, son of John 
Scott. His mother's name before marriage was Margaret 
Hardin. Mr. S. came with his parents to Hancock county 
in 1834, '^^ ^h^ ^S^ ^^ ^^*^ years, and has been a resident 
since. He was. married to Margaret I. Elliott. She was 
born in Ohio, February 23, 1845. They were married, 
June 7, 1870. She died, April 21, 1889, and is buried at 
Greenfield. Their children's names are Noble T., died at 
the age of three years, and Margaret A. 

Mr. Scott served as County Commissioner several 
years, and also Trustee of Sugar-Creek township from 
1872 to 1874. ^^ joined the Masonic order in 1856, and 
delights in its many noble teachings. To know Mr. Scott 
is to know a tiptop gentleman, of fine business qualifica- 
tions throughout. He is now (1892) engaged in the lumber 
trade in New Palestine. He is a Democrat and an upright 
man. 

ALFRED POTTS. 

Mr. Potts was born in Franklin county, Indiana, on 
the 22d day of December, 1818, son of William Potts, an 
early settler of Franklin county ; came there in 1814 from 
Kentucky. Alfred Potts was married to Mary Craney on 
the nth day of May, 1843. She was born December 25, 
1818 ; came to Hancock county in 1853, where they have 
since resided ; settled about seven miles south-west of 
Greenfield. 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 295 

Mr. Potts has served as Justice eight years ; elected as 
a Democrat, and is yet acting with that time-honored 
party. In his make-up he is retired, well posted on the 
affairs of his count}^ a refined gentleman, and is known 
far and wide as such. He has always been a farmer, and 
has resided on his farm here since 1853. At that time the 
county was quite new. No children have been born to Mr. 
and Mrs. Potts. 

I am under many obligations to Mr. and Mrs. Potts 
for attentions during my sojourn in their neighborhood. 

BENJAMIN F. WILSON. 

Mr. Wilson resides three miles south-west of Green- 
field, where he owns a fine farm, which he delights to 
cultivate. He has long been a citizen of Hancock county ; 
in fact, he was born there on the 26th day of February, 
1839. ^^ ^^ '^ ^°" °^ Holbert Wilson, who was among 
the first settlers of the county. B. F. Wilson's mother's 
name before marriage was Amanda Fry ; also an early 
citizen of that locality. Mr. W. was married to Lucinda 
Thomas, April 21, 1861. She is the daughter of the late 
Hiram Thomas. 

Children's names of Mr, and Mrs. Benjamin F. Wil- 
son : Thomas J., married Miss Cord ; reside in Greenfield. 
Andrew J., married Sarah Larribee. Holbert F., married 
Eliza J. Burk. Elizabeth A., single, and school teacher. 
Amanda F., married Thomas Cramers; reside in Green- 
field. Reba L., teacher. Benjamin L., died in 1864; is 
buried at Mt. Lebanon cemetery. Delia M., at home. 
John W., at home. Gertrude, at home. 

Mr. Wilson was elected Justice in 1880 and served 
four 3'ears ; was elected County Commissioner, November, 
1890, and is at this time (1895) serving, with the general 
approval of his fellow-citizens who elected him. He was 
elected as a Democrat, and has always acted with that 
party. In person Mr. Wilson is large, full six feet high, 




THE NEW HANCOCK COUNTY COURT-HOUSE. 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES, 297 

and weighs two hundred pounds. He is a progressive 
man, and in favor of all the improvements going on in his 
State and county. He is a brother of William F. and John 
W. Wilson, of the same locality. 

CASPER HERR. 

Mr. Herr owns a fine farm just south of Mohawk, in 
Buck-Creek township, Hancock county, Indiana, where 
he has made a splendid home, surrounded with plenty. 
He is a tine farmer, as his well cultivated fields attest. He 
is a well informed gentleman, posted on current affairs, is 
a Republican, and a member of the Christian Church, as 
well as his wife, who I would not forget as one of the most 
worthy women of the county. She is quite well preserved 
for a lady of her age, and worthy of the place she occu- 
pies. While gathering material for this work I was at their 
pleasant home, and received their kindness and encourage- 
ment, for which I am thankful. Mr. Herr and familv are 
lovers of music, and their merry home rings out daily with 
sweet sounds. His son, Louis A., is a fine flutist, and Mr. 
Herr is never himself so much as when seated at the organ, 
whose well worn keys respond to his light, well-trained 
touch. 

Kasper Herr was born in Maroldsweisach, in Bavaria, 
Germany, August 13, 1833. He was married to Dora 
Carlina Wisigman in 1853 in Germany. She was born in 
Niederfulbach, German}', May 7, 1833 ; came together to 
America in 1855. Alter landing in New York they came 
to Hamilton, Ohio, and he worked by days work at any- 
thing he could get to do. In the fall of 1858 they moved 
to Madison county, Indiana, where he commenced farming 
on Neal McCullough's farm, south of Anderson. In 1862 
he rented a farm ot John R. Boston, in the southern part 
of Madison county, and lived on it several years. In 1869 
he rented the farm he now lives on of William Shaffer, 
which contained two hundred and forty acres. On January 



298 THE PIONEERS OF 

7, 1876, he bought one hundred and twenty acres of the 
above-named farm at a cost of $6,600. On March i, 1881, 
he bought sixty acres more of said land at a cost of $2,500. 
On September 29, 1885, he bought twenty-five acres more, 
for which he paid $1,000, making in all two hundred and 
five acres, paying therefor $10,000. 

Following are the names of their children : Freddie 
E., born November 3, 1854, ^^ Germany. Andrew L., 
born January 13, 1857, in Butler couni}^, Ohio. Maggie 
B., born October 20, 1858, in Butler county, Ohio. Dan- 
iel G., born March 16, i860, in Madison county, Indiana. 
Charles F., born May 15, 1861, in Madison county. John 
K., born March 6, 1863, in Madison county. James V., 
born October 19, 1866, in Madison county. Annie C, 
born October 12, 1869, in Madison count}^ Lizzie, born 
April II, 1872, in Madison county. Kasper C, born 
November 6, 1874, ^^ Madison count}-. Lewis A., born 
May 4, 1878, in Madison county. 

Freddie E. was married to Elihu Johnson in 1881. 
Daniel G. was married to Annie H. Smith, April i, 1886, 
and died August 10, 1887, aged twenty-seven years and 
two months ; buried at Pleasant Grove cemeter}^, Hancock 
county. Andrew L. died August 18, 1889, aged thirty- 
tw^o 3'ears ; buried at Sugar-Creek cemetery. Maggie B. 
was married to William A. Barnard, March 29, 1885. She 
died June 25, 1890, aged thirty-one 3'ears and eight months ; 
buried at Sugar-Creek cemeter}-. Charles F. died July 
16, 1870, ag^ed nine years and two months. He came to 
his death by a horse falling on him ; buried at Sugar-Creek 
cemetery. George was married to Mattie Collins, October 
9, 1890. 

Mr. Herr joined the Masonic order at Greenfield in 

1875. 

IRA M. COLLINS. 

Mr. Collins is a son of William and Hepsabeth M. 
Collins, two of the pioneers of both Madison and Hancock 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 299 

counties. Ira was born in the latter county, July 30, 1856, 
and raised on a farm, but early in life became a cripple, 
and his pursuits have been varied. He received a good 
common education, which fitted him for business, and in 
1882 he was elected Recorder of Hancock county, Indiana, 
and served four years. He studied law with Hon. James 
L. Mason, of Greenfield. Was married to Kate Paullus, 
of Dayton, Ohio, August 16, 1883, She was born in Day- 
ton, Ma}' 22, 1864, daughter of John R. and Sarah J. 
Paullus. Mrs. P.'s name was Sarah J. Aker before mar- 
riage. She is yet living, but Mr. Paullus died in West 
Alexandria, Ohio, March 10, 1893. 

The following are the names of Mr. and Mrs. Ira 
Collins' children: Luther, born August 10, 1884. Paul 
H., born Februar}^ 4, 1887. Courtland M., born Decem- 
ber 16, 1889. 

Grandfather Thomas Collins was born in Ohio, May 
9, 1806, and died, July 9, 1878 ; buried on the old farm on 
Lick Creek, Hancock county, Indiana. His wife's name 
was Sarah W. Bra}^ She died in 1834. ^^ W'^^ married 
the second time to Rachel Blakely. 

For the past few years, since the gas era, Mr. Collins 
has been engaged in having wells dug throughout the 
county, and also in gas fitting, and but few men know more 
about gas than he does. He is now a resident of Ander- 
son, where one would naturally look for a gas man. Mr. 
Collins is a brother of Dr. Collins, of Mohawk ; Thomas 
Collins and Mrs. George Herr, of Anderson ; Mrs. Kuhn, 
of Tipton ; Mrs. A. D. Trueblood, of Indianapolis, and 
two or three others whose names I can't recall. Mr. Col- 
lins is an Odd Fellow ; joined at Greenfield in 1883. He 
was elected Recorder as a Democrat, and is a member of 
that party now (1895). 

Mrs. Collins is a niece of Captain M. L. Paullus, of 
,. Greenfield, a lady of fine attainments and a good conver- 
sationalist. 



300 THE PIONEERS OF 

JOSEPH R. LEAKEY. 

My old friend, whose name heads this sketch, now a 
resident of Greenfield, Indiana, was born in Henry 
county, Indiana, November 26, 1826, son of Levi Leakey. 
His mother's name was Rachel Elliott. They were pio- 
neers of Henry county. J. R. Leakey learned the 
carpenter's trade. He has worked at it most of his life 
and is a capital, good workman. He was first married to 
Rebecca Stubblefield February 18, 1849. She was also 
born in Henry county, Indiana; died in August, 1850 ; 
buried near Cadiz, Indiana, at the Clark cemetery. Mr. 
Leakey was married the second time to Rebecca Collier, 
daughter of the late James F. Collier, a Baptist preacher 
of note in Central Indiana. This event occurred in 
Februar}', 1853, near Markleville, near where Miss Collier 
was born in 1836. She died in November, 1878 ; is buried 
at the Collier cemetery. 

The following are the names of their children : Mar- 
tin L., Francis M., James E., a Baptist preacher of note. 
He died in Monticello, Blackford county, Indiana, where 
he is buried. Ada J., Alvey M. and Cory A. 

Mr. Leakey was the third time married to Mrs. 
Catherine A. Rose January 17, 1880. She was born in 
Madison county, Indiana, April 9, 1841. Mr. Leakey 
entered the United States service in October, 1861, in the 
Second Indiana Cavalry, and served most of the time as 
wagon-master. He was in several battles. Stone River, 
Hartsville and others. He was discharged at Indianapolis 
in November, 1864. Mr. L., in 1866, joined the I. O. O, 
F. lodge at Mechanicsburg, Indiana. Mr. and Mrs. L. 
are members of the Christian Church at Greenfield, Indi- 
ana. Mr. L. is a Republican in politics, and a clever 
gentleman, as my long acquaintance proves. To him and 
family I am indebted for man}' acts of kindness received 
at their home. 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 3OI 

Who the children married: Martin L., married to 
Ellen Kerns. Francis M., married to Nora Weesner. 
Rev. James E., married to Louan Hamilton. He died 
February 28, 1886. Ada, married to Ezra Broomfield ; 
live in Anderson. She was born in November, 1865. 
Alvey M., married Julia Petro in September, 1892 ; live in 
Greenfield, Indiana. Cory A., married to W. W. 
Seward in September, 1892 ; live in Markleville, Indiana. 
All the children were born of the second marriage, near 
Markleville, Madison county, Indiana. Mrs. Catherine 
A. Leake3''s maiden name was Harmon. Her first hus- 
band's name was Bradley Rose. 

OLIVER A. COLLINS, M. D. 

Dr. Collins, son of William Collins, and grandson of 
the late Thomas Collins, one of the pioneers of Hancock 
and Madison counties, was born in Hancock county on the 
2 1 St day of February, 1850. His mother's name before 
marriage was Hepsabeth Bunker. Dr. Collins studied 
medicine with Dr. S. A. Troy in 1878 ; attended college at 
Indianapolis, and graduated at the Indiana Medical Society 
in 1886. He is also a member of the Hancock County and 
State Medical Societies. He stands high among the doc- 
tors of the county, and is preparing a book, w^hich he 
designs to publish soon, on Botan}-, a subject he is well 
prepared to write on. He located at Mohawk, Indiana, 
soon after graduating, where to-day (1892) he has a fine 
practice, and where he has built a cozy dwelling and office. 

Dr. Collins was married to Estella McCune, of Green- 
field, December 31 , 1885 ; was elected Coroner in 1884, and 
re-elected in 1886, as a Democrat. He joined the Odd 
Fellows at Greenfield in 1888. Mrs. Collins is a lady of 
fine attainments, a good artist and performer on the piano. 
She presides with dignity over her well appointed home, 
where I was kindly cared for in 1892 while canvassing for 
this work, for which the\' have mv thanks. On another 



302 , THE PIONEERS OF 

page will be found the portrait of Oliver A. Collins. 
Mrs. Collins was born, November 22, 1869. Dr. Collins 
was a delegate to the National Convention which met at 
Omaha, July 4, 1892. 

WILLIAM COLLINS, 

Son of the late Thomas CoHins and Sarah Bray, that 
being her name before marriage, was born in Gallia count}', 
Ohio, September 25, 1828. Came to near New Columbus, 
Indiana, with his parents in 1829. He was married to 
Hepsabeth M. Bunker, who was born in Tennessee, Janu- 
ary 22, 1832. She came to Wayne county, Indiana, with 
her parents in 1832, then to Madison county in 1838. This 
worthy couple were married by Rev. Sol Reger, April 21, 
1852. 

Children's names : Thomas W., married to Lampson 
Lakins. She is deceased ; buried at the Hayes cemetery, 
in Hancock county. He was the second time married to 
Miss Alistus York ; reside in Anderson. Ira M., married 
to Kate Paullus in 1883 ; served four years as Recorder of 
Hancock county. Dr. A. O., married to Stella McCune ; 
reside at Mohawk. Jesse, deceased, aged twenty years; 
buried at the Ha3'es cemeter}^ Sarah J. and Reuben, at 
home. Eva and Emma, twins. Emma married Rev. 
Thomas H. Kuhn ; reside at Tipton, Indiana. Martha 
A., married to George Herr ; reside at Mohawk. Ella, at 
home. Mary, died at the age of eleven years; buried at 
the Hayes cemetery. Eva, married to A. D. Trueblood ; 
reside in Indianapolis. 

Mr. Collins served four years as Justice in Green 
township, Hancock count}- ; elected, April, 1882. His 
parents are buried on the old farm on the Hancock and 
Madson county line, where they lived so long and where 
the family was raised. Thomas Collins died July 9, 1878. 
His wife died in 1834. Mrs. William Collins' parents are 
dead, and are buried at the Busby cemetery, in Madson 
county, four miles east of Pendleton. 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 3O3 

William Collins resided in Green township thirty-four 
years, during which time no one can say but what he has 
at all times been an honest man, and during his career as 
Justice wielded the scales with fairness to all. He is well 
preserved, of fine physical make-up, fair complexion and 
hair. Both Mr. and Mrs. C. are members of church, and 
are held in high esteem wherever known. They now 
reside near Fortville, on what is known as the Simmons 
farm, where I trust they may live many happy years in the 
decline of life. Mr. Collins is a brother of Samuel C, 
Thomas, James, George W., Jesse, Robert, Mrs. Jacob 
Foust and Mrs. Robert Blakely. Thomas died in the 
army in 1863. He was married to Miss Walker, now Mrs. 
William Davis. Mr. Davis died in Kansas, in 1895. 

Thanks to this good family for favors while gathe.ing 
items for this work. 

BENTON L. BARRETT. 

Benton was born near Eden, Hancock county, Indi- 
ana, October 28, 185 1, son of Edward H. and Mary A. 
(Reeves) Barrett. Benton received a good, practical 
education, and has devoted his time to farming and stock- 
raising, and is one of the most intelligent young farmers in 
the count^^ He was married lo Miss Sarah Stewart, 
daughter of Ithamer Stewart, of near Knightstown, 
Indiana, on the 31st day of October, 1872. She was born 
October 30, 1851. She is a lady worthy of her pleasant 
home. Mr. Barrett was made a Mason at Eden in 1870 ; 
appointed postmaster there about that time and served 
four 3'ears ; sold goods there a short time, when he 
returned to the farm, where he is to-day (1895). 

Mr. Barrett and wife are members of the M. E. 
Church and Sunday-school at Eden. Seven children 
have been born t-o them. Eva M., eldest daughter, was 
married to John W. Albea August 10, 1893. Their home 
is a pleasant one, and I was kindly entertained there while 



304 THE PIONEERS OF 

canvassing for this work, for which they have my thanks. 
Mr. B. is a Democrat, and well informed on the political 
events of his country. In person he is of medium size, 
hve feet eight inches in height and of good features. 

AQUILLA GRIST. 

Among the tiptop men of Hancock county, Indiana, 
I do not wish to forget Mr. Grist, of Buck-Creek township. 
He was born in Fayette county, Indiana, May 15, 1846, 
son of George and Frances (Johnson) Grist. He came to 
Hancock county in 1848, with his parents, at the age of 
two years, where he has since lived. He was united in 
marriage to Elizabeth Arnett September 6, 1868. She is 
a daughter of the late Shadrach H. Arnett, one of Han- 
cock's most prominent men. Her mother's name before 
marriage was Jane Steele. Mrs. Grist was born Septem- 
ber II, 1849. But one child has been born to them, 
Minnie M., born August 6, 1869, one of the bright 
teachers of the county and a fine conversationalist and 
writer. 

Mr. Grist has served four years as Trustee, from 1884 
to 1888, and was appointed County Commissioner, vice 
Andrew Hagen, in 1801, and at this writing (1892) is a 
candidate for that office and will no doubt be elected. He 
has served as Dn^ector of the Farmers' Mutual Insurance 
Company for several years, also Township Assessor. 
He has also acted as Deputy Coroner for the county. He 
joined the Masonic order at Oakland, Indiana, in 1867, 
but is now a member of McCordsville Lodge, No. 501. 
He is a Democrat of the first water, and as such is held in 
high esteem. His social qualities are good, and he and 
his family are very popular, not onl}^ in Buck Creek 
but throughout the county, where they have lived so long. 
They have a pleasant home, where they welcome their 
many friends. When traveling over the county I never 
pass their home without stopping. Long may they live 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 305 

and prosper. On the 4th day of June, 1892, he was 
nominated in a Democratic primary convention for Com- 
missioner for the Western District over John E. D3e by a 
very handsome majorit3^, and on the 8th day of November, 
1892, he was elected ; re-elected in 1894. He is now ( 1895) 
a resident of Greenfield. 

WESLEY S. CATT. 

Mr. Catt was born in Hancock county, Indiana, on the 
9th da}' of February, 1841, and lived with his parents up 
to the time he was twenty-one years of age. Soon after 
he enlisted, on the 13th day of August, 1862, in Company 
B, Ninety-ninth Indiana Regiment, for three years or 
during the war. He was in many hard-fought battles, 
among which were Vicksburg, Black River and Jackson, 
after which his regiment returned up the Mississippi River 
to Memphis. In 1863 marched to Scottsboro, Alabama, 
and there encamped for the winter. In April, 1864, went to 
Chattanooga, Tennessee, where his regiment was engaged 
in a hard fight at Mission Ridge. He was also in the bat- 
tles of Buzzard Roost, Dalton, Kenesaw Mountain, Big 
Shanty and Marietta. Then he crossed the Chattahoochie 
River at Boswell. Hood's army attacked them, when some 
hard fighting was done with the bayonet, lasting four 
hours, when the Union army was successful, and a large 
amount of provisions taken ; also several stands of arms. 
Here General McPherson was killed, and General Logan 
took command. Soon after his regiment marched to the 
extreme right to encounter Hood's army, when, on the 
28th day of July, engaged in a six-hour fight, where many 
rebels were killed and wounded. Then to Jonesboro ; cut 
the railroad, and captured Atlanta, Georgia ; then to the 
sea ; captured Fort McAllister ; thence by ship to Buford, 
South Carolina ; then to Gadsboro ; then crossed the river 
to Columbia, South Carolina ; then to Raleigh, North Car- 
olina, where his regiment had their last fight. Thus it will 
18 



306 THE PIONEERS OF 

be seen that Mr. Catt has been in some of the hardest 
fought battles of the war, besides many small ones and 
skirmishes not mentioned. Returned home via Richmond, 
Washington, Parkersburg, Lawrenceburg, Indiana, and 
Indianapolis, where he was discharged, June, 1865. 

On September i, 1865, Mr. Catt was married to Mary 
L. Clark, at Dayton, Ohio. Five children have been born 
to them, as follows: George O., born April i, 1868; he 
died, July i, 1868, and is buried at the Simmons cemetery. 
Laura B., born August 25, 1869; married to Charles Bee- 
son, November 10, 1888. James A., born August 13, 
187 1. Noble S., born February 11, 1875. P^Hna, born 
July 31, 1877. 

Mr. Catt has been a resident of Hancock county all 
his life, except the three years he was in the army, and now 
lives in Jackson township, four miles north-west of Char- 
lottesville. But few men have been in as many battles and 
made so many hard marches as Mr. Catt. I am glad to 
make mention of his honorable war record. He enlisted 
in Captain James H. Carr's company at Greenfield, Indi- 
ana. George Teague was mustered in as Captain, April, 

1863 ; then R. P. Andis was appointed Captain, March 20, 

1864 ; then Isaiah A. Curry was appointed Captain, April 
19, 1865. The Colonel's name was Alexander Fowler, 
of South Bend, Indiana. 

WILLIAM COLLINS, SR. 

This grand old pioneer of Buck-Creek township was 
born in South Carolina, December 9, 18 12, and came to 
Hancock county, Indiana, in 1835. ^^ ^"^^^ married to 
Elizabeth Sewell, August 26, 1841. She died. May 4, 
1864 ; buried at Mt. Comfort cemetery. Mr. Collins is a 
son of William and Nancy (Canaday) Collins. He died 
February 22, 1842 ; she died in 1867. 

The following are the names of Mr. Collins' children : 
John, born May 18, 1843 ; married to Rachel Craig. Wil- 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 307 

Ham, born August 29, 1844; single, at home. Nancy L., 
died May 9, 1864. Adaline M., born July 26, 1848 ; died 
April 16, 1849. James H., born July 4, 1850 ; married to 
Mary Johns ; live in Sullivan county, Indiana. Leroy and 
Leander, twins, born May 9, 1854. Leroy married Mar- 
tha Thornton. Leander married Sarah Plummer. 

Mr. Collins was again married to Catherine Thornton 
in 1870. One child was born to them, Lear, June 4, 187 1 ; 
single, at home. He was the third time married to Persilla 
Plummer, formerly Mrs. Alexander. She was born in 
Kentucky, June 18, 1824. She came to Indiana in 1834. 
His first wife was born in Virginia, September 20, 181 2; 
came to Indiana in 1834. ^^^ second wife died in 1873. 
All of the deceased members of the family are buried at 
the Mt. Comfort cemetery. 

Mr. ColHns, it will be noticed, was one of the first set- 
tlers of this part of the county. He settled in the woods, 
when neighbors were few and far between. He went to 
work with strong hands, and has went through a life of 
toil, yet looks on the light side of things like a sensible 
man. He has lived continually in one locality, and I think 
on the land he first entered. He is a strong Democrat, 
and has always voted that ticket. I am glad to notice this 
worthy family in the Pioneer. During my canvass of the 
county for this work a few pleasant hours were passed at 
his house, listening to the recital of early times, as related 
by him. Mr. C. does not belong to any church or order. 

Since the above was written Mr. Collins has died. The 
following obituary notice appeared in the Democrat at the 
time of his death : 

William Collins was born in Abigail District, North Caro- 
lina, December 29, 1S12, and died March 37, 1893. He was 
brought up and schooled in strict forms and usages of the Pres- 
byterian Church, he coming to Indiana in the year 1S34. He 
was married to Elizabeth Sewell, August 26, 1841. She died, 
May 4, 1864, and his daughter died, May 9, 1864, leaving him 



308 THE PIONEERS OF 

with six children, all of whom are still living. He was nuuried 
twice, and his last wife still survives him. He was a kind and 
loving father and a noble man, and died very suddenly with 
heart disease. Being in his usual health, he went to spend the 
day with his son, Leander, and fell off his chair dead. His 
funeral was preached at the M. E. Church at Mt. Comfort by 
Elder Thompson, after which the remains were laid to rest in 
the cemetery by the side of his wife and daughter. 

Papa, Ihou art gone to rest, 

We will not weep for thee ; 
For thou art gone where oft on earth 

Thy spirit longed to be, 

Papa, we miss thee from thy house, 

We miss thee from thy place ; 
A shadow o'er our life is cast, 

We miss the sunshine on thy face. 

Papa, thou art gone to rest. 

Thine is an earthly tomb, 
But Jesus summoned thee away, 

Thy spirit called thee home. 

Papa, we miss thy kind and willing hand. 

Thy fond and earnest care ; 
Our home is dark without thee. 

We miss thee everywhere. 

Papa, thou art gone to rest, 

Thy toils and care are o'er, 
And sorrow, pain and suflering now 

Can thee disturb no more. 

Papa, peaceful be thy silent slumber. 

Peaceful in thy grave so low ; 
Thou no more will join our number, 

Thou no more our sorrows know. 

Farewell, dear papa, but not forever. 

There will be a glorious dawn ; 
We shall meet to part, no never, 
On the resurrection morn. 

LEAR COLLINS. 

ANDREW F. YETTER, 

Son of Daniel and Luvina (Burkett) Yetter, was born 
two miles north of Knightstovvn, Indiana, May 25, 1842. 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. . 3O9 

He was married to Caroline Craft, daughter of Timothy 
Craft, April 19, 1869. She was born, March i, 1848. Her 
mother's name was Mary Stephens. Daniel Yetter, father 
of Andrew F., was born in Union county, Pennsylvania, 
in 1811 ; came to Indiana in 1832^ and settled in Henry 
county; died, April, 1888; buried at Knightstown. Mrs. 
Daniel Yetter was born in Montgomery county, Ohio ; 
resides in Maple Valley, Hem 3^ county. 

The following arc the names of Mr. and Mrs. Andrew 
F. Yetter's children: Mary A., born January 29, 1868; 
died November 20, 1885 ; buried at Knightstown, Lora 
E., born March 30, 1871 ; married to Walter Ham, son of 
Hon. G. W. Ham, December 29, 1890. 

Mr. Yetter is one of the active men of Hancock county, 
and one of its most extensive stock traders, especially in 
horses, of which he has some of the lightest steppers to be 
found anywhere. He delights to handle them and show 
them to his friends, and is never happier than when seated 
behind a 2 :30 horse. 

Since the above was written Mrs. Caroline Yetter has 
died, in 1894, and is buried at Knightstown. She was a 
grand, good woman, who was loved in life and lamented 
in death. Long may her grave be kept green, for there 
are no flowers too fragrant and no vines too green for one 
we delight to remember. 

WILLIAM M. HAYES, 

One of the substantial men and farmers of Brown 
township, was born in 1841, and has resided in Hancock 
county all his life. His father was an early settler on 
Sugar Creek, where he is buried in a cemetery bearing his 
name. William M. was married to Ada Cook, March 8, 
1869. 

The following are the names of the children born to 
this marriage: John W., born August 18, 1871. James 
E., born November 15, 1874. Millie, born March 5, 1880 ; 



3IO THE PIONEERS OF 

died, October i, 1881. Robert P., born June i, 1882 ; died 
in 1885. All the deceased are buried at Hayes cemetery. 
Mr. Hayes was the second time married to Sarah C. Sul- 
livan on September 5, 1887. She was born in North 
Carolina, October i , i860. One child, Leroy C, was born 
to them, October 7, 1888. 

Mr. Hayes is a member of the Masonic order at War- 
rington, a Democrat of the old school, a good farmer, and 
delights in his profession. He is a brother of John B. 
Hayes, at one time Commissioner of Hancock county, and 
Daniel Hayes, a farmer of Brown township. I am glad to 
give Mr. H. a notice in this work as a progressive man and 
farmer, and a son of one of the pioneers of Sugar Creek. 
He resides one mile east of Milner's Corner. 

Since the above was written Mr. Hayes was killed by 

the explosion of an engine near his home, December 24, 

1895. 

JOHN P. MURPHY. 

Mr. Murphy was born in the center of Indiana, near 
Indianapolis, July 17, 1843. His father's name was James 
H. Murphy ; mother's name before marriage was Elizabeth 
Evans. John P. was married to Flora Wilson. She was 
born in Hancock county, Indiana, April 17, 1838; settled 
there in 1845, two miles north of Mohawk, where they 
reside on a farm, and live at home, enjoying the fruits of 
their labor. Mr. Murphy enlisted in Company D, Seventy- 
ninth Indiana Volunteers, August 12, 1862, Captain J. R. 
Bracken, Colonel Fred Knefler. He served his country 
long and well, and was in several hard-fought battles, 
among which were Perryville, Stone River, Missionary 
Ridge and Kenesaw Mountain, where he was wounded, 
June 23, 1864. On June 9, 1865, he was discharged at 
Nashville, Tennessee. 

The following are the names of his children : Ella F., 
married to George McCray. Etta J., married to W. H. 
Albea, merchant at Mohawk. James W., married to Lillie 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 3II 

Dobbins. Benjamin F., Alexander H. and John E., single 
and at home at this writing. 

Mr. Murphy is a Republican and a member of the G. 
A. R. He is a well informed man and clever gentleman. 
Don't fail to call on him when you pass that way. Never 
too busy to welcome his friends. 

JOEL MANNING. 

My old friend and fellow-soldier, Mr. Manning, was 
born in Wayne county, Indiana, April 21, 1842, just in 
time to make a capital soldier in the war of 1861-5. He 
enlisted in Company K, Eighth Indiana Volunteers, on 
August 10, 1862, Captain Vandevender, and served long 
and well in that gallant regiment, under Colonel Benton. 
He was in the battles of Cedar Creek, Magnolia Church, 
Champion Hills and Vicksburg. He was discharged at 
York, Pennsylvania, May 24, 1865. He is a son of Joseph 
and Catharine (Whistler) Manning, and worked at the 
wagon-making business for many years. 

After the war Mr. Manning was married to Miss Red- 
mon, who was born in Clermont county, Ohio, in 1849. 
This marriage occurred in 1867. Seven children have 
been born to them, five of whom are dead. All died in 
infancy. The two living are Charles C, born, June/i87^J>^ 
and Clara M., born May i, 18^. He located at Milner's 
Corner in 1877 ; served several years as Justice, being 
elected in 1882. He was appointed postmaster there on 
March 8, 1888, and has served all the time since, giving 
unusual satisfaction to his patrons. 

Mr. Manning had the misfortune of losing an eye in 
the army, which has given him much trouble since, but the 
Government for which he fought has not forgotten him. 
Glad to notice him and family in this work. 

ELI AS McCORD. 

In writing of the citizens of Hancock county I do not 
wish to forget Elias McCord, of near McCordsville, one of 



/ 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 313 

the prominent men of Vernon township, who served as 
County Commissioner. He was elected in i860, and 
served, to the entire satisfaction of the people, for six years. 
He joined the Masonic order at Oaklandon, Indiana, in 
1850, and practices its many noble teachings. He is a son 
of Aquilla McCord. His mother's name was Mary Apple 
before marriage. They were born in Ohio ; he in 1794 ; 
she in 1796; married in 1815 ; came to Indiana in 1834; 
both buried near Oaklandon. 

Elias McCord was married to Eliza Newkirk, Decem- 
ber 24, 1839. ^^^^ died in 1870. Children's names by 
this marriage : John G. Cyrus F. was killed in battle at 
Nashville, Tennessee, in 1864. One daughter married to 
Jasper Walker ; reside in Nebraska. Flora R., married to 
Paul Moore ; reside in Nebraska. Afabell, married to 
Dudley Haney ; reside in Tipton. George T., died in 
infancy. 

Mr. McCord was the second time married to Mrs. 
Trittipo, in 1873. Three children were born to this mar- 
riage. Two are dead and one living, Annie E. Mrs. 
McCord died in 1883. He was the third time married to 
Nancy C. Barnard, in 1884. Mr. McC. settled on his 
farm in 1841 ; has served two terms as Justice of the Peace 
in his township. Glad to give him and family a sketch in 
this work. 

JOHN W. WHITE. 

Mr. White was born in Fayette county, Indiana, on 
the i8th day of July, 1827, son of Robert and Jane (Kirk- 
patrick) White. He was married to Temperance Simmons 
on the 25th day of May, 1848. She was born in Rocking- 
ham county, Virginia, October 2, 1830. She died, April 
27, 1888, and is buried at the Simmons cemetery, in Han- 
cock county. 

The following are the names of their children : Wil- 
liam H., born March, 1839. Samuel V., born April 17, 
1850 ; died. May 12, 1886; married to Adaline Johnson. 



314 THE PIONEERS OF 

Robert S., born March 15, 1852 ; died, January 29, 1864. 
Amanda K., born October 1854; married to George W. 
Sowerwine ; reside in Wilkinson, Indiana. They were 
married August 17, 1876. He was born in Hamilton 
county, Indiana, February 9, 1851. John P., born July 
12, 1870; died April 10, 1891- Leander F., born May 19, 
1858. Lena F., married to Milton D. Masters. 

Mr. White resides near Shirley, Hancock county, at 
the crossing of the I., B. and W. and the southern divis- 
ion of the Michigan and Louisville Railroad, the town 
being laid out in part on his farm. He moved there in 
1873, is pleasantly located, has a splendid farm, and enjo3'S 
life with the best of them. He belongs to the Christian 
Church, and as clever gentleman as lives in Hancock 
county. May he live long and prosper is the wish of his 
many friends. 

JOHN JACKSON, SR. 

What shall I sa}^ in memory of this grand old pioneer 
of Hancock county, Indiana? He was born in Wayne 
county, Indiana, May 15, 1831, son of Len and Elizabeth 
(Harden) Jackson. The parents of John Jackson and wife 
were born in North Carolina, and came to Wayne county 
in 1828. John was married to Martha Pritchard, Novem- 
ber, 1854, daughter of Wylie and Millie Pritchard. His 
parents are buried at the Cook cemetery, in Hancock 
count3\ Mr. J. has been a citizen of Hancock county for 
many years, on the county line, where he has a fine farm 
that he has made out of the green woods. He is a strong 
Democrat and an honest man. 

The following are the names of his children : Frank 
P., married to Mahala Jones. Levi, married to Louiza 
Eckhart. Elizabeth, married to Samuel Price. George, 
married to Rebecca Iford. Millie, married to Dr. Charles 
Pratt ; reside in Willow Branch. Mary E., married to Ed 
Walker. Ellen, married to Paul Jones (deceased) ; buried 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 315 

at the Cook cemeteiy. She died in 1882. William J., 
single and at home. Alfred W. 

Mr. Jackson was married the second time to Mrs. 
Irena Hayes. She was born in Hancock county, Indiana, 
March 20, 1839, daughter of Nicholas and Catharine (Col- 
lins) Garrett. Mrs. Jackson is a member of the Christian 
Church, and stands deservedly high among all her neigh- 
bors. Mr. Jackson has lived on his present farm since 
1862, and has all the improved machinery that is in the 
market. He is a Jacksonian Democrat, and believes the 
salvation of our countrj' depends on the success of his 

I am glad to notice this worthy family in the Pioneer, 
and to thank them for so many acts of kindness at their 
pleasant home. I hope he may live long to enjoy the fruits 
of his labor, to which he is so justly entitled. 

JESSE F. COLLINS. 

Mr. Collins was born in Hancock county, Indiana, on 
the 27th day of January, 1834, '^^^ ^^^^ resided in the 
county ever since. He owns and resides on a fine farm in 
Brown township, on the line dividing Hancock and Madi- 
son counties, near Milner Corner. He is a son of that old 
veteran, Thomas Collins, who was a pioneer of both Mad- 
ison and Hancock counties. He was born in Ohio, May 
6, 1806; came to Madison county ir 1829; died July o, 
1878. Mrs. Thomas Collins' name before marriage was 
Sarah Bray. She died in 1834. Jesse Collins is a tiptop 
farmer, genial gentleman, and stands high in both counties. 
He was first married to Mary J. Newman in i860. She 
was born in West Virginia, February 10, 1842, and died 
July 13, 1881, aged fifty-one years ; is buried at the Harlan 
cemetery. She was a grand, good woman. 

The following are the names of the children born to 
Mr. and Mrs. Collins : Martha E., born August 25, 1861 ; 
married to J. T. Smith. William E., born October 8, 



3l6 THE PIONEERS OF 

1864 ; married to Alice Collier. Thomas V., born October 
20, 1867; died July 29, 1870. Charles N., born August 
24, 1872 ; died October 29, 1873. Alma, born May 29, 
1874 ; died September 14, 1876. Mazy F., born December 
29, 1870 ; married to William L. Collier. Maggie P., 
born April 16, 1879. Mary E., born December 29, 1880. 

Mr. Collins was again married to Mary J. Harlan on 
January 10, 1885, daughter of J. P. Harlan, of Brown 
township. She was born there September 8, 1851. The 
children born of this marriage are as follows: Jesse P., 
born April 26, 1886; died March 7, 1891. Christian R., 
born March 16, 1888; died in infancy. Date H., died in 
infancy. Essie L., born January 23, 1890. Ruby A., 
born November 26, 1891. 

Mr. Collins belongs to the M. E. Church and Mrs. C. 
to the Baptist. He is a life-long Democrat, and one of the 
successful farmers of Hancock county. He is a brother of 
William, Samuel, James, Robert, Thomas, George W., 
Mrs. Blakel}' and Mrs. Jacob Foust. All living to-day 
(1894) except Thomas, who lost his life in the war of 
1861-5.. 

Since the above was written Mrs. Collins has departed 
this life, January, 1895. 

ROBERT COLLINS, 

Son of Thomas Collins, one of the pioneers of Madi- 
son county, coming from Gallia county, Ohio, where he 
was born. May 9, 1806. He landed in Madison county in 
1829, and resided there three or four years, when he moved 
to Hancock county, on the line dividing the two counties, 
in Brown township, where he developed a fine farm on 
Sugar Creek, and where he died, July 9, 1878. He was 
married to Sarah Bray. She was born in Ohio in 1808, 
and died in 1834, after having been married some eight 
years. Mr. Collins was in a few years again married to 
Rachel Blakeley, who survived him- Mr. and Mrs. C. 
are buried on the old home farm. 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 317 

Robert Collins was born in Hancock county in 1848, 
and married Clarinda Cook, daughter of the late Joel 
Cook, one of the pioneers of Hancock county. She was 
born about the year 1850. Her mother's name before 
marriage was Susan Rodgers. Her father was born in 
Virginia in 1795 ; died in 1871. His first wafe died April, 
183 1 ; second wife died in 1878. She is buried at the Har- 
lan cemetery ; his first wife at the Guard cemeter}-. Robert 
Collins is a splendid farmer, and owns and lives on the old 
homestead, on Sugar Creek, Hancock county. He is just 
in the prime of life, well situated and highW respected. He 
is a 3'ounger brother of William, Jesse, Samuel, James, 
Thomas, George, Mrs. Blakeley and Mrs. Jacob Foust. 
Mrs. Robert Collins is a sister of Harrison, Lorenzo I., 
Joel, Eli, Mrs. Joel Ham and Mrs. Cochran, and half sis- 
ter of Mrs. Benjamin McCarty, Mrs. Yelton, Mat F., 
Daniel and John F. Cook. 

F. M. JOHNSON, 

Son of David and Mary C. (Stanford) Johnson, was 
born in Markleville, Indiana, September 7, 1862, and was 
married to Mazie Thorp, March 18, 1882. She is the 
daughter of Craig and Sarah (Trees) Thorp. She was 
born in Washington, Indiana, Ma}- 4, 1864. Their chil- 
dren's names are Guy, Carl, May and Clarence. Mr. J. 
is a member of the I. O. O. F. at Charlottesville, as w^ell 
as his wife a member of the Rebekah degree. 

Mr. and Mrs. Johnson reside in Charlottesville, and 
have been for the past five or six years engaged first in the 
drug trade and then in the general dry goods and grocery 
business, where they have built up a fine trade, and enjoy 
the confidence of the people, socially as well as otherwise. 
Mr. Johnson is a brother of Dr. Elbert Johnson, of Knights- 
town, H. C. Johnson, of Wilkinson, and Alva Johnson, of 
Markleville. Their father, David Johnson, was born in 
North Carolina in 1836, and died, February, 1873 ; buried 
at the Harlan cemetery in Hancock county. 



3l8 THE PIONEERS OF 

WILLIAM L. GARRIOTT. 

This old-time citizen of Brown township, Hancock 
county, Indiana, was born in Fayette county, Indiana, 
September 12, 1823, son of Reuben and Sarah (Darter) 
Garriott ; came to Hancock county in 1836. He was mar- 
ried to Margaret L. Steele in 1842. She was born in 
Brown county, Ohio, in 1819. Since their marriage they 
have resided in or near Warrington, where they have went 
in and out before that people for half a century. Mr. G. 
has served the people long and well as Justice of the 
Peace, and Trustee for time immemorial, and has settled 
estates without number, so much so I hardly know what 
Brown would do without him. A Democrat of the old 
school, never wavering in the long line he walked. 

Mr. and Mrs. Garriott are members of the Christian 
Church. Mrs. Garriott's father's name was James Steele ; 
mother's name, Jane (Reeves) Steele, early citizens of 
Hancock county. Also children's names: H. C, Eliza 
Newman, Martha A. Wood, Sarah M. Powers and Amanda 
F., at liome. H. C. and W. H. Powers reside at Wilkin- 
son. Mr. Wood is deceased, and buried at Greenfield. 

WELLINGTON COLLYER. 

This old and highly respected citizen of Hancock 
county, Indiana, was born in Ohio, September 25, 1816, 
son of Gabriel Collyer. He came to Franklin county, 
Indiana, with his parents, when a boy, on the 14th day of 
October, 1841. He was married to Rebecca Leming. She 
was born, October 13, 1821, daughter of Samuel and Eliz- 
abeth (Lamport) Leming. Her parents came to Hancock 
county in 1830. Mr. and Mrs. Collyer were married in 
Hancock county b}^ George Leachman. 

The following are the names of their children : Til- 
man H., George L., Elizabeth ; Thomas J., died in 1857 ; 
is buried at the Low cemetery, on Little Sugar Creek ; was 
eleven years of age ; Philander, Emeline ; Arozina, died 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 319 

in 1861, aged two years and four months ; is also buried at 
the Low cemetery ; Mary, married to Moses H. Penthind. 

Mr. Collyer has served as Trustee for six years and 
Assessor four }ears ; elected as a Democrat. No person 
in Hancock county stands higher than Mr. C. and family. 
They came early to the county, and have witnessed the 
wonderful changes in these years. Mr. C. has been blessed 
with a strong constitution to go through the hardships of 
pioneer hfe. He died August 5, 1895; is buried at Little 
Sugar-Creek cemetery. 

The following obituary notice appeared in the Han- 
cock Democrat shortly after Mr. Collyer's death : 

Wellington Collyer, one of the oldest, best known and 
respected citizens of Hancock county, died at his home, in 
Brandy wine township, August 5, 1895, after a protracted iUness, 
leaving surving him, as his widow, Rebecca W. Collyer, with 
whom he was intermarried in 1S41, and his children, Tillman 
H. Collyer, intermarried with Martha J. Hawk, George L. 
Collyer, intermarried with Amanda McBane, Philander Coll- 
yer, intermarried with Cynthia Furman, Elizabeth Collyer, 
intermarried with Willard W. Low, Emaline Collyer, intermar- 
ried with John Garner, and Mary Collyer, intermarried with 
Henry Pentland. 

Wellington Collyer was born September 25, 1S16, in Lorain 
county, Ohio, and was at his death nearly seventy-nine years of 
age. He came to Franklin county in 1837, then moved to, 
entered and settled on the land on which he died, in the year 
1839, when the same was in its natural state, having lived on 
the farm about fifty-six years. He became a member of the 
Christiau Church about forty years ago, and so continued the 
rema'nder of his life. He died as he had lived, an earnest 
christian, there is no doubt. The writer of this knew him well 
and intimately for forty years, socially, politically and in busi- 
ness relations. He was thoroughly honest, true and honorable 
in all the relations of life, and a good husband, a kind, forbear- 
ing father, a good neighbor, and for many years a prominent 
citizen, an active, sincere and earnest Democrat, but always 
fair, reasonable and just, never countenancing trickery or fraud 




"THE OLD SWIMMIN' HOLE," 

Near Greenfield, Ind., Made Famous by a Poem Written by 
James Whitcomb Riley. 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 32 1 

to obtain party success. He was buried in the Low grave- 
yard, August 8, 1895. The funeral sermon was preached in a 
very able discourse by Rev. Aaron Walker, of Indianapolis, 
and it wr.s attended by a very large number of people, proba- 
bly the largest procession in the history of the neighborhood. 

Thus ends the life and history of one of the best and most 
valuable of the old citizens of this county. Farewell, Welling- 
ton CoUyer ; you have crossed the great river, and soom some 
of your old friends now here will greet you there. 

An Old Citizen. 

HENRY H. GIPE. 

When I write of Henr\' H. Gipe, of Wilkinson, Indi- 
ana, I write of one of the best and fastest wagon-makers 
in the two counties, and as good a soldier as ever carried a 
gun or knapsack. He was born in Pennsylvania, Novem- 
ber 12, 1836, son ot George and Lyda (Blymire) Gipe, and 
brother of Jacob and John Gipe. Henry learned his trade, 
and was married to Ruan Hines at Germantown, Indiana, 
in 1854. She was born in Ohio in 1837. Mr. G. became 
a citizen of Hancock county in 1882. In 1862 he enlisted 
in Company E, One Hundred and First Indiana Volun- 
teers, Colonel Done. He served long and well, and was 
in the battles of Atlanta, Resaca, Goldsboro-, Chickamauga, 
Stone River and many others of smaller note and skir- 
mishes. He was wounded at Stone River, December, 1863. 
He is a member of the G. A. R. and of the Republican 
part}^ You wall always find his latch-string out, and ready 
and willing to assist all true comrades ; of a jovial make-up, 
and one whom to know is to admire. Call on him at his 
home in Wilkinson. 

DR. WILLIAM A. JUSTICE. 

It seems but a short time since I knew Dr. Justice as a 

little boy at Markleville, son of the late John J. and Lustacy 

(Blake) Justice. He was born just east of Markleville, 

October 12, 1852 ; married to Francenia Lacey, January i, 

19 



322 THE PIONEERS OF 

1879. She was born in Henry county, Indiana, Septem- 
ber 23, 1856. Dr. Justice received a good education in the 
common schools of the county, and taught school several 
years previous to reading medicine. He graduated at the 
Kentucky School of Medicine at Louisville in 1878, and 
located at Eden, Indiana, in 1879, where he commenced 
the practice, and has since resided, and to-day (1895) has 
a fine practice. He has served as Coroner four years and 
Trustee for Green township ; elected November 6, 1894. 
He is a Democrat of the old school, a Mason of high 
standing, and a member of Eden Lodge, No. 477, and 
Royal Arch Chapter at Pendleton. Socially he and his 
accomplished wife stand high in Eden. 

The following are the names of their children : Lee, 
Alma L., Ellen M. and William P. The last one died, 
August 31, 1894, and is buried at Eden. Dr. Justice is a 
brother of John H., Mrs. Dr. Fussell, Ethan and Maggie 
Hardy, the last one deceased, and is buried at the Walker 
cemetery. 

I am glad to notice Dr. Justice and wife in this work ; 
have known them long, and received many acts of kind- 
ness from their hands. In fact. Dr. J. is a Universalist, 
and liberal in his education and training. His father was 
born in 1827 ; died, August, 1895, and is buried at the 
Walker cemetery. 

JOHN H. JUSTICE, M. D. 

Dr. Justice was born near Markleville, Madison county, 
Indiana, September 9, 1854, son of John J. and Lustacy 
(Blake) Justice, the former, son of Hezekiah Justice, and 
the latter, daughter of John Blake, old citizens of Adams 
township, Madison county. Dr. John H. received a good 
common education in the schools of his locality, and taught 
eight winters before he read medicine. His brother, William 
A., was his preceptor at Eden when he first commenced 
reading. He afterwards attended medical schools, and 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 323 

graduated at Indianapolis in 1889. He practiced in Eden 
until 1892, when he located at Maxwell, where he was 
engaged in the general practice till 1895, when he became 
a citizen of Greenfield, where he at once commanded a 
line practice, and where he to-da}^ (1895) stands high as a 
practitioner. He was elected Coroner in 1892 and re-elected 
in 1894, as a Democrat. When he was twenty-one years 
of age he joined the Masonic order at Eden, No. 477, and 
the Council at Pendleton a little later. At one time he was 
a member of the I. O. O. F. at Markleville. He was mar- 
ried at Eden to Emma Barrett, daughter of Andrew and 
Mar}' (Jarrett) Barrett, on January 20, 1883. Children's 
names are Bertha and Ada. Emma's mother died, April, 
1886, and is buried at Eden. Dr. Justice's father died, 
August 14, 1895, and is buried at the Walker cemetery. 

Dr. Justice is of a happy make up, and draws friends 
and patrons on sight. His wife is a lady of line attain- 
ments, and their home is one of the pleasantest to be found 
anywhere. Thanks to them for many favors shown. Dr. 
J. is a brother of Dr. W. A. Justice, Mrs. Dr. Fussell, 
Ethan Justice and Maggie Hardy, deceased. 

JOEL COOK FAMILY. 

Wilkinson, Ind., October 37, 1S95. 
Samuel Harden, Esq., Greoijicld, Ii/d.: 

Dear Sir : Find the within short sketch of the Cook 
family for publication in your book now in press : 

Mr. and Mrs. Adam Cook are the ancestors of the Cook 
family, of which I will give a short sketch. Adam Cook was 
born on the Atlantic Ocean while his parents were en route to 
America from Germany, in 1637. His parents settled in what 
is now Madison county, Virginia, and resided there on a 
farm until death called them. Daniel Cook was a son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Adam Cook. He was born in Madison county, 
Virginia, and was reared on a farm. He volunteered under 
George Washington and served through the entire Revolu- 
tionary war, and was in line when General Cornwallis 



324 THE PIONEERS OF 

surrendered to George Washington at Yorktown. He returned 
to his home, where he married Rosannah Wilhoit in 1792. To 
them were born thirteen children, Abram,Joel, Rhoda, Jemima, 
Dinah, Anna, David, Ephraim, EHzabeth, Cornehus, John, 
James and Madison. Ehzabeth, Jolin and James are yethving. 
The entire family lived to pass the half-century mile post before 
death invaded the family circle. 

Joel Cook, second son, of which we will more particularly 
write, was born in Madison county, Virginia, October 5, 1795. 
He was married to Nancy, daughter of Matt Farley, June 2, 
1820. To them were born Matt F., April i, 182 1 ; Angeline, 
October 15, 1823; Daniel, July 29, 1S26 ; John F., July 15, 
1829; Jane, August 29, 1832. Nancy, wife of Joel Cook, died 
June 2, 1835, and was hauled to the graveyard, as it was then 
called, on a one-horse sled, where now a modest slab marks 
her last resting place. Mr. and Mrs. Cook moved from Vir- 
ginia to Rush county, Indiana, in 1S33, where' they lived one 
year, and in 1S34 they moved to the old Cook farm, on the 
banks of Sugar Creek, where they entered the land and began 
the arduous task of making what is now one of the finest farms 
in Hancock county. Joel remarried on June i, 183S, to Susan 
Rodgers. To this union were born Sarah, March 20, 1S39; 
Nancy, December 27, 1840 ; Harrison, December 9, 1S43 ; Joel, 
April 115, 1847 ; Martha E., February 26, 1849; Lorenzo D., 
April 26, 185 1 ; Emily, July 16, 1853; Eli, September 18, 1855; 
Cassinda, December 30, 1858; Mary A., January 15, 1862. 
This entire family of fifteen children are living and enjoying 
good health. 

Matt F., married Sarah Pritchett January 11, 1849. To 
them were born eleven children, nine of whom are living. 
Levi J., Mary J. Noland, Missouri A. Simmons, John H., 
Benj. H., Nancy I., Joel A., Sarah L. Smith and Matt F., Jr. 
Matt F. and Sarah Cook bought of Hiram Harlan the farm on 
which they live. Matt F. working for twelve and one-half 
cents a day to pay for it. 

Angeline, married Benjamin F. McCarty, who served for 
many years as Justice of the Peace in Brown township. They 
resided near the Cook farm. To them were born Nancy, John, 
Joel, Jasper N., Ithamer V., Benjamin F. and Sarah J. 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 32^ 

Daniel, married Esther Shelton. To them were born 
Thomas and Mary A. He was again married to Elizabeth 
Walker. To them were born Seth, Jane, Joel, Elizabeth J., 
Martha, Lustacy and Retta. Again married to Evaline Ellison. 
No children were born to this or to the fourth marriage to 
Mrs. Mills, of Anderson, Indiana. Mr. Cook is a physician, 
and resides in Fishersburg, Indiana. 

John F., married to Mary Cronk in 1853, who died in 1859 
of consumption. There were no children to this marriage. 
He was the second time married to Sarah A. Ham, daughter of 
V. S. and Virginia Ham. To this marriage were born eleven 
children, Lilly, Ardella, Laura, John A., Nancy V., Dora, 
Leonard, Arthur V., Louisa and two infants. Ardella and 
Laura are married. The family reside on the Madison and 
Hancock county line in an elegant brick residence. 

Jane, married to William Judd. To them was born 
AlinervaJ. William soon died, and Mrs. Judd remained a widow 
several years, after which she married Hayden Yelton in 1869, 
and resides now on the farm two miles west of Cadiz, Indiana. 
To this marriage was born Joel C. Yelton, who is married and 
lives with his aged mother. Hayden Yelton was a staunch 
farmer, a man of superior judgment and an uncompromising 
Democrat. He, after a short illness, died in 1894, leaving Mrs. 
Yelton a widow again. 

Sarah, married to Rev. William J. Ham. To this marriage 
were born Alice, Mary O., Thomas and Delia. Mr. and Mrs. 
Ham moved to Tipton county several years ago, where they 
bought and made an elegant farm. Mr. Ham and daughter, 
Alice, died and are buried in the Hai'lan cemetery. The 
widow, two daughters and son reside in Tipton county on 
their farm. 

Harrison, married to Margaret Noland. To this marriage 
were born Lonnie, Florence M., Elmer, Susan J. and Margaret. 

Nancy, married to William Bridges. To this marriage 
four children were born; but one, Otto, is living. 

Joel, married to Maria Reger. To this marriage were born 
three daughters, Fannie and Etta, living. 

ISIartha E., married to Albert Cochran. To this marriage 



326 THE PIONEERS OF 

were born seven children. Charles, the oldest, is dead. They 
reside at Frankfort, Indiana. 

Lorenzo D., married to Elizabeth Reger. To them were 
born Milo B., Horace P. and Victor H. They reside north of 
Wilkinson on a fine farm. Porter is in Earlham College and 
will graduate in 1S97. 

Emily, unmarried, and lives with Mr. and Mrs. William 
Bridges. 

Eli, married to Mary Armstrong, and resides on the old 
Cook homestead. To them were born Ida and Clarence, two 
promising children. 

Cassinda, married to Robert J. Collins, and resided on the 
Thomas Collins farm until recently, when Mr. C. had, by econ- 
omy, bought the Stanley farm, west of Warrington, where 
they now reside. To this marriage were born five daughters 
and one son. Two dead. 

Mary A., married to Riley Hamilton. To them were born 
three sons, the latter one a New Year's gift, January i, 1895. 
They reside on their farm west of Warrington, adjoining Mr. 
and Mrs. R.J. Collins. 

Joel Cook lived on the farm he entered sixty-one years, 
until March 12, 1S70, when he peacefull} passed to that coun- 
try from which no traveler ere returns. Susan Cook remained 
a widow until December 19, 1879, when death suddenly 
extinguished the vital spark. They are resting in the Harlan 
cemetery, where a magnificent monument marks their tombs. 

In the family of Joel Cook at the present time there are 
no lawyers, the family seldom asking the services of the legal 
profession. There is now one licensed minister. Rev. I. V. 
McCarty; three physicians, Daniel, second son of Joel, Joel, 
son of Daniel, and Benjamin H., son of Matt F. Benjamin F. 
McCarty, Sr., and Jr. have filled the office of Justice of the 
Peace, and Levi J. Cook the same office. The remainder of the 
family have held no ofiice. The entire family are Democrats, 
and the following churches are represented: Baptist, Christian, 
Methodist and United Brethren (Liberal Branch). The elder 
of the family are all Baptists. 

The family now numbers about one thousand. On October 
5, 1895, the first Cook reunion was held. All the children of 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 3^7 

Joel were present but Mrs. Angelina McCarty. Five hundred 
and seventy of the reUUives vv^ere estimated to be present. 
Very truly, Benjamin H. Cook. 

BENJAMIN H. COOK, M. D. 

The subject of this sketch was born on a farm, August 
22, 1858, third son of Matt. F. and Sarah Cook, pioneers 
of Hancock count}^. His grand parents, Joel and Nancy- 
Cook, were Virginians, of German descent. James and 
Rachel Pritchet were Buckeyes, from Gallipolis, Ohio, and 
of Scotch-English descent. Henry and Easter Carter, 
great grandparents, were from Maryland. Daniel and 
Rosannah Cook, great grandparents, were from Madison 
count}^ Virginia. 

Benjamin Harvey Cook was reared on a farm, and 
received a common school education, sufficient to enable 
him to teach ; taught one term in 1880 ; farmed again one 
3'ear ; began reading medicine under Dr. Lundy Fussell at 
Markleville, November 12, 1882 ; graduated from the med- 
ical college at Indianapolis, February 26, 1885 ; remained 
with Dr. Fussell until April i, 1886, when he located at 
Wilkinson, Indiana, where he now resides and enjoys a 
lucrative practice. He was initiated as an Entered Appren- 
tice Mason in Warrington Lodge, October 5, 1881, passed 
to a Fellow Craft, November 4, 1881, and raised to the 
Sublime Degree of Master Mason, November 30, 1881 ; 
received the Chapter degrees in Knightstown Chapter in 
1893, and the Council degrees in Cryptic Council the same 
year. He received the Commandery degrees in Knights- 
town Commandery, No. 9, in 1895, thus completing all the 
degrees in Ancient York Masonry. He has filled the 
offices in Blue Lodge from Junior Deacon to Worshipful 
Master. In 1886 he was made a Knight of Pythias; was 
First Past Chancellor of Morning Star Lodge, and is a 
member of said lodge at this time in good standing. Was 
also made an Odd Fellow in 1886 b}' Evening Star Lodge 




HIGH SCHOOL BUILDING, Greenfield, Ind. 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 329 

at Wilkinson ; has passed all the chairs, and received the 
Encampment degrees in Blue Ribbon Encampment, No. 
48. Has represented his various lodges in the grand 
bodies and filled appointments on important committees. 
Is also a member of Eastern Star branch of Masonry, and 
Rebekah branch of I. O. O. F. He joined the Christian 
Church in 1888 at Wilkinson, and holds a membership now 
as elder and trustee of that church. 

Dr. Cook married Laura E. Cooper, January 30, 1889. 
To them were born three bright little boys — Theophilus 
Parvin, Harvey Weir and Robbie D. Murl. They have a 
happy home in Wilkinson, where the Doctor has the best 
library, medical and literary, in the township. He is not 
wealthy, but is coming to that point, and promises to be a 
competitor as a physician and surgeon to be envied by his 
older brethren. 

STEPHEN JACKSON. 

Mr. Jackson was born in Madison county, Indiana, 
November 18, 1842, son of Levi and Elizabeth (Harden) 
Jackson, early settlers of the county. He died in 1856. 
She died in 1875 5 both buried at the Wilson cemetery on 
Sugar Creek, Hancock county, Indiana. Stephen Jackson 
was married to Susan Fry January 27, 1867. She was 
born in Kentuck}' December 16, 1842. Her parents are 
buried at the Cooper cemetery, six miles north of Green- 
field, Indiana. She died in November, 1867. He died in 
1878. Andrew Jackson, grandfather of Stephen, died in 
1848, at the age of one hundred and sixteen years. He 
was in the Revolutionary war ; is buried on Lick Creek in 
Madison county. Stephen's brothers and sisters are as 
follows : Theresa, died in Illinois ; Andrew, Jesse, John, 
George, Mary and Levi. Stephen enlisted in Compan}^ 
B, Eighty-ninth Indiana Volunteers, in 1862, Captain, 
Sam Henry, of Pendleton, Indiana. He was in the bat- 
tles of Murfreesboro, Pleasant Hill and Fort Blakely ; 
discharged at Mobile, Alabama, in 1865. 



330 THE PIONEERS OP 

The following are the names of Mr. and Mrs. Stephen 
Jackson's children: Delia. Cassius, married to Cassa 
Gallagher, daughter of the late James Gallagher. Emma, 
at home. 

Stephen Jackson resides near the county line dividing 
Hancock and Madison, where he owns a fine farm in the 
former county. He is devoted to his family and friends, 
a liberal gentleman, a true Democrat and a member of 
the G. A. R. at Pendleton. 

REV. JOHN HEIM 

Was born in Knightstown, Henry county, Indiana, 
on the 7th day of January, 1844. His childhood days 
were spent in that town. He was born of German par- 
ents, his father coming from Fline, Kingdom of Wurtem- 
burg, in German3^ His mother came from Alsace, near 
Strassburg. When he was eleven years of age his parents 
moved from Knightstown and brought him to his present 
home, three miles east of Greenfield. Johnn}^ as he was 
called, had many hard struggles. His father being a 
cripple, he helped his mother raise the family. When the 
old plank road went down, Johnny, with a one-horse 
wagon, helped to haul the gravel that made the first pike 
in Hancock county. For many years he hauled wood to 
Greenfield. It is said at one time that he knew where 
every man's wood-house was in Greenfield. 

After he had passed through many struggles on the 
farm and had grown to manhood, in the spring of 1867, 
under the preaching of Rev. Thomas Shipp, he was 
brought to see his lost condition without Christ as his Sav- 
ior. On the 23d day of March, 1867, he was converted 
and united with the Methodist Protestant Church. He of- 
ten felt it was his dut}' to enter the ministry. The way 
was opened for him to enter the preparatory department 
of Adrian College, Michigan. His struggles began again, 
and he worked his way through school. Dr. Asa Mahan, 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 33 1 

who was President of the College at that time, offered him 
a chance if he would accept it, and that was if he would 
saw his wood, feed and care for his horse, feed, milk and 
care for his cow, and do chores in general, he (Mahan) 
would board him and send him to school. The young 
German bo}- accepted this for three 3^ears, but the fourth 
year his studies had increased so that he needed all of his 
time. So he decided to board himself. After he had 
spent the day in his recitations a number of times he has 
gone on the streets of Adrian and sawed wood by lamp 
light to get food for the next day. A number of meals 
that he ate were composed of boiled potatoes and salt 
while he was studying those difficult sentences in Virgil, 
Zenophon and other writers, and solving the problems in 
mathematics. Alter four years had been spent within the 
walls of Adrian College, in the spring of 1872, he left the 
college, came home and farmed during the summer. 

In the fall of 1872 he united with the Indiana Confer- 
ence of the Methodist Protestant Church, and was appointed 
to Morristown circuit. It had five appointments. Brown's 
Chapel, near his home, Morristown, Cynthiana, in Shelby 
county, Manilla, in Rush county, and Pleasant Hill, near 
where Mt. Lebanon church is now, three miles south of 
Greenfield. 

At the close of this conference year, in which a num- 
ber of souls were converted and added to the church, he 
was, in 1873, appointed to Monroe circuit, near Blooming- 
ton, in Monroe county. Here he became acquainted with 
and married Miss Cynthia Stark, daughter of E. J. Stark, 
a wealth}' farmer and large land owner. He and his wife 
have been traveling for twenty-four years in different parts 
of the State. During that time he has filled some of the 
first pulpits of the Methodist Protestant Church. He spent 
two years as pastor of the Dillon-street church at Indian- 
apolis. He is at this time pastor of the Frankfort circuit. 
The appointments are in Clinton and Boone counties. 



332 THE PIONEERS OF 

He is not without iiis faults and makes mistakes and 
has a few bitter enemies. He has a wife and one daughter, 
who has been totally blind for sixteen years. His father 
died in 1885. His mother, in her eighty-eighth year, is 
still living. He is making his home at present at his 
mother's old home. 

WILLIAM W. SCOTTON. 

Mr. Scotton resides in Philadelphia, Indiana, son of 
Ebenezer Scotton, one of the early settlers of Hancock 
county. William was born in Ohio, January 6, 1836. He 
was married to Rebecca Hawkins, May 12, 1857. She 
was born in 1834. Mr. Scotten enlisted in Company B, 
Eighth Indiana Volunteers, August 8, 1862, Colonels Ben- 
ton and Shunk, Captain Walls. He served three years, 
and was in several hard-fought battles, Thompson's Hill, 
Raymond, Champion Hills, Big Black River and the siege 
of Vicksbug, where he was severely wounded. May 22, 
1863, and soon after lost his eye sight, and at the time had 
one ear shot away. He was a gallant soldier during those 
three years, and his record is good and honorable. He 
was discharged at Indianapolis, Jul}^ 5, 1865.. 

The following are the names of Mr. and Mrs. Scotton's 
children : Flora A., married to Milton T. Stout. He died 
April 1 1 , 1882 ; buried at Sugar-Creek cemetery. Thomas 
E., married to Minnie Green. Elmer E., married to Net- 
tie Fuller. All reside in Hancock county. Leota died at 
the age of two years. 

Ebenezer Scotton was born in Ohio, July 28, 1807. 
His wife, Anna Welling, was also born in Ohio in 1805. 
They came to Hancock county, Indiana, in 1842. She 
died, November, 1874. ^^ <^^^^ April 2, 1893. Both are 
buried at Sugar-Creek cemetery. Mrs. Scotton's parents 
are buried near Cumberland, on Buck Creek. 

W. W. Scotton had two brothers in the war of 1861-5, 
John B., killed at Vicksburg, May 22, 1863, and Ebenezer 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 333 

C, died at Helena, Arkansas, February 23, 1863, aged 
twenty-one years. W. W. is Republican, and he and his 
family stand high socially at Philadelphia. 

WILLIAM G. CALDWELL. 

Mr. Caldwell was born in Virginia in 1822, son of 
William C. and Christina (Dellinger) Caldwell. William 
G. Caldwell was married to Mary McCrary, daughter of 
James McCrary, in 1848. Mr. C. came to the county 
(Hancock) in 1839, ^^^^ State in 1836. Mrs. C. was born 
in North Carolina in 1826. No children have been born 
to them. Mr. C. was elected Sheriff of Hancock county, 
Indiana, in 1863. Served two 3'ears as a Democrat and 
filled the office with credit to all. About the year i860 he 
joined the Masonic order at Warrington, Indiana, and has 
been a faithful member ever since. He practices its noble 
teachings, and no worthv brother ever knocked at his door 
in vain. 

Mr. Caldwell now (1895) resides in Wilkinson, Indi- 
ana, where he and his noble wife expect to live the 
remainder of their lives. No better couple ever lived than 
Mr. and Mrs. Caldwell. Thanks to them for their never- 
ending kindness to me. Mr. C. is a free thinker, and 
desires to go to that good land and has no desire to close 
the door when he gets in. He is a large man, full six feet 
high, with a fine presence. Call and see this grand 
couple when in Wilkinson, who are delighted to see their 
many friends. 

WILLIAM A. DUNN. 

William A. Dunn was born in Abbeville District, South 
Carolina, August 20, 1816, of Scotch parentage, and lived 
there until the year 1834, when he removed with his parents 
to Indiana, and settled in Fayette county, near Conners- 
ville, where he lived until the fall of 1835, when he, with 
the balance of his family, removed to Buck-Creek town- 
ship, Hancock county. He entered one hundred and sixty 



334 THE PIONEERS OF 

acres of land in the year 1836, on which he settled, and 
lived continuously, with the exception of five years, until 
his death, which occurred February 24, 1893. In 1844, his 
health having failed him, he rented his farm out and 
removed to Franklin count}', Indiana, where he lived for 
five years, when, having regained his health, he again 
removed to his I'arm. 

Mr. Dunn was united in marriage, March 2, 1837, to 
Frances Ann Harvey, of Franklin county, Indiana, with 
whom he lived pleasantly for fift3'-four 3'ears, until her 
death, which occurred Januar}- 6, 1892. The fruits of their 
union were ten children, six girls and four boys, five of 
whom are living and five dead, three boys and two girls. 
Those living are Mary J., married to Albert M. Petty, of 
Illinois, February 10, 1858. Nancy C, married to Henry 
B. Wilson, of Hancock county, November, 187 1. Martha 
E., married to Samuel Leslie, November 21, 1869. Mis- 
souri F., married to John W. Deel, September, 1874. 
William H., resides on a part of the old homestead, and 
to-day holds the Government patents for the same, issued 
to his father in 1836, being now fifty-nine years in the 
family. 

William A. Dunn united with the Primitive Baptist 
Church at Cumberland, Marion county, Indiana, in 1843, 
with his wife, with which church they remained faithful 
and consistent members until their death. Mr, D. was a 
Democrat of Jacksonian principles, and a man of great 
moral worth, and died with the respect of all who knew 
him. 

I am glad to give this early and interesting family a 
sketch in this work, who came to Buck-Creek township, and 
helped to develop it. Mr. and Mrs. Dunn underwent 
hardships that we will never fully know, but their memory 
will live for time to come, with that of others who first 
came to Hancock county. FoHowing will be found a 
notice of his death ; 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 335 

William Abner Dunn was a resident of Buck-Creek town- 
ship, but at the time of his death, which took place February 
34, 1S93, he was making his home with a daughter living near 
Julietta, Marion county, Indiana. His death was occasioned 
from a severe attack of pneumonia fever. He was born in 
South Carolina August 20, 1S36, and emigrated with his par- 
ents to Indiana in 1S33, and settled in this county in 1S34, 
when the State was little less than a wilderness. 

He was married 4:o Frances Harvey March 2. 1S37, who 
preceded him to the home on high a little more than one year 
ago. To them were born ten children, four sons and six 
daughters, five of them preceding him to that world unex- 
plored by mortal vision, and one son and four daughters 
survive him. 

Politically he was a Democrat of earnest convictions. A 
man who cast his vote from a principle of right as it appeared 
to him. 

Religiously he was a Primitive Baptist of untiring faith, 
and had honored his profession for fifty-three years. "Precious 
in the sight of the Lord is the death of his saints." A truly 
good man has fallen. For more than half a century he lived a 
devoted, honored and esteemed christian life. His affection 
for his family was undying. He was loved and esteemed as a 
neighbor. His funeral services were conducted in the M. E, 
Church at Mt. Comfort Sunday, February 36. May the Lord 
comfort the bereft and sorrowing relatives and friends. 

R. W. Thompson. 

WILLIAM H. DUNN. 

William H. Dunn was born in Franklin county, 
Indiana, August 8, 1848, and removed, with his parents, 
to Hancock county, Indiana, in January, 1850, since 
which time he has continued to reside on the same farm 
until the present time, being a period of forty-seven years. 

William H. Dunn was united in marriage with Mary 
J. Staley October 7, 1869, and lived with her until her 
death, which occurred March 3, 1871. There were born 
to this union one child, a little girl, who lived but two 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 337 

months, preceding its mother to the better world just one 
week. Mr. Dunn was again united in marriage to Martha 
E. Wilson, a daughter of Henry B. Wilson, of Hancock 
county, Indiana, October 2, 1872, and has enio3ed a 
peaceful and happy life to the present time. To them 
have been born eight children, six girls and two boys, all 
of whom are living, except one boy. The eldest girl, 
Cora J., was married to George E. Smith March 8, 1891. 
The balance of the children are still living with their par- 
ents, their names being George O., Mary F., Neva G., 
Sarah, Bessie and Ruth. 

Mr. Dunn vmited with the Primitive Baptist Church in 
January, 1871, and has been a consistent member of the 
church of his choice to the present time. His wife, 
Martha E. Dunn, united with the same church in October, 
1888, and was baptized by emersion by Elder Kemper. 
William H. Dunn received the Entered Apprentice De- 
gree, F. & A. M., in October, 1889, P^^ssed to the degree 
of a Fellowcraft in November, 1889, and was raised to the 
Sublime Degree of a Master Mason in December, 1889. 
Mr. and Mrs. Dunn were organized as charter members 
of the Order of the Eastern Star at Oakland in September, 
1894. 

Mr. Dunn taught school several years in his locality, 
and is among the active citizens of Buck Creek. He 
resides a short distance south-west of Mt. Comfort, and 
near where his parents lived so long. Thanks to him 
and family for their never-failing kindness to me while in 

that locality. 

JOSEPH CLAYTON. 

Mr. Cla^'ton was born in Wayne county, Virginia, 
May 26, 1806, and was married to Ruth Roberts, July 15, 
1828. She was born in Scott county, Virginia, August 31, 
1808. They came to Hancock county, Indiana, in 1838, 
and settled two miles east of Greenfield, where the family 
resided many ^^ears, and where Mr. Clayton died, Novem- 
20 



338 THE PIONEERS OF 

ber 29, 1870. He is buried at the cemetery in Greenfield. 
Mr. and Mrs. Clayton were strong, determined pioneers, 
and when they came to the county it was new and unde- 
veloped to a great extent. The National road was at that 
time in a very bad condition, but it was soon improved. 
About that time the country began to fill up, and soon Mr. 
and Mrs. Clayton had plenty of neighbors. 

Mrs. Clayton is 3'et living, after raising eleven children. 
She is in her eight3^-seventh year of age. She has eighty 
grandchildren, fourteen great grandchildren, and the fifth 
generation is represented. One would hardly realize what 
this good woman has went through in these eighty-seven 
years, yet she is cheerful and looks on the bright side of 
things generally, and is strongly attached to her family 
and friends. Am glad to give this pioneer family a sketch 
in this work. 

The followincr are the names of the children of Mr. 
and Mrs. Clayton, the first five born in Virginia and the 
last six in Indiana : Mar}', born in 1829 ; married to James 
Hamilton. Richard, born February 14, 183 1 ; died in 1832. 
Henry, born February 4, 1833; died, February, 1881. 
Harriet E., born April 18, 1888 ; married to William Catt. 
She died in 1888, and is buried at Mt. Lebanon cemetery. 
Emeline, born December 5, 1836; married to Joseph Lem- 
ons. He died in 1881 in Missouri. His family reside 
there, near Hannibal. James, born April 25, 1839; ^i'^^"- 
ried first to Cressy Cooper and the second time to Miss 
Hamilton; reside in Missouri. Nancy, born February i, 
1842 ; married to Peter Lamb. He died August 18, 1884, 
and is buried at Philadelphia, Hancock county, where the 
family reside. Isaac, born June 17, 1849; married first to 
Sarah J. Davis and the second time to Fann}' Roberts. 
Martha, born December 4, 1846; married to John Wig- 
gins ; reside near Fortville. John, born February 17, 1849 ' 
married to Emaline Lower. He, as well as Isaac, resides 
in Green township, Hancock county, Indiana. Sarah, 



340 THE PIONEERS OF 

born October lo, 185 1 ; married to Henry Winslow ; reside 
in Hancock count}', Indiana. 

During the lite time of Joseph Clayton he belonged to 
the Christian Church. Mrs. C. is also a member of the 
same church, but, on a(!count of age, does not attend. ■ 

H. C. JOHNSON. 

Harry was born in Markleville, Indiana, August 17, 

1865, son of David and Mary (Stanford) Johnson. He 
was married to Nancy L. Lakin July 17, 1886. She is the 
daughter of the late William F. and Luvina (Addison) 
Lakin, born near Charlottesville, Indiana, November 12, 

1866. Children's names are Ethel B. and Emert O. Mr. 
and Mrs. Johnson stand high at their home in Wilkinson, 
where they are engaged in the general mercantile busi- 
ness, formerly in the drug business there until 1893. Mr. 
J. is a member of the K. of P., also I. O. O. P., and Mrs. 
J. of the Rebecca degree. He is a brother of Dr. Elbert 
Johnson, of Knightstown, Indiana ; Alva Johnson, of 
Markleville, and Frank Johnson, of Charlottesville, Indi- 
ana. 

David Johnson was born in North Carolina in 1836, 
son of Jesse and Lyda Johnson, who came to Hancock 
county in 1837. David died near Markleville, Indiana, in 
February, 1873 ; is buried at the Harlan cemetery. Mrs. 
David Johnson was born in Henry county, Indiana, in 
1835 5 resides in Wilkinson, Indiana. They were married 
in 1858. Mrs. H. C. Johnson is a granddaughter of the 
Hon. John Addison, of Jackson township, Hancock 'coun- 
ty, Indiana. 

THE BRADDOCK FAMILY. 

This family came eai^ly to Hancock count}^ and settled 
on Brandywine, perhaps as early as 1830. Moses Brad- 
dock and wife were born in Pennsylvania. He died in 
1840. She died in 1870 ; buried at the Braddock cemetery 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 34I 

on the home farm. When the}- came to the county there 
was not much improvement on Brandywine. 

The following are the names of Mr. and Mrs. (Ring- 
land) Braddock's children: William,, married to Julia 
Forgey. He died in 1869. She died in 1872 ; buried at 
the home cemetery. Three children were born to them, 
Margaret, Arthur and Blanch. Blanch was married to 
John L. McNew. He died August 12, 1895; buried at 
the Greenfield cemeter}^ He was Prosecuting Attorney 
for Hancock county at the time of his death. He was 
elected in November, 1894, as a Democrat. Mrs. Blanch 
McNew resides in Greenfield and is a lady of high attain- 
ments. Henry, the second child of Moses Braddock, as 
well as all of the children, was born in Penns3'lvania. 
He was married to Miss Thomas. Three children were 
born to them. Freeman, John and Alfred. Freeman was 
married to Miss Cook, daughter of Thomas Cook. They 
reside about two miles south-west of Willow Branch. 
Noah W., one of the prominent farmers of Jackson town- 
ship, was born about the 3^ear 1838. He was first married 
to Nancy Earls. She died in 1875. One child was born 
to them, Edwin, a bright young man and teacher, born in 
1861. He had many triends who mourn his early death. 
He is also buried at the Braddock cemetery on Brandy- 
wine. Richard, another son of Moses, never married. 
He has a fine farm and dwelling one mile south-west of 
Willow Branch. He read medicine but never practiced. 
He, as well as all of the Braddocks, is a Republican and 
well informed. Sarah, a daughter, was never married. 
She died in 1880, aged about fifty years. No better fam- 
ily than the Braddock. I am glad to give them a notice 
in the Pioneer. 

WILLIAM POTTS, 

One of the substantial men of Hancock covmty, Indi- 
ana, resides three miles north-west of Greenfield, where he 
owns a fine farm, and has it under a high state of culiva- 



342 THE PIONEERS OF 

tion. After a long life of toil, plent}- has come to bless 
him in his declining years. He is a great reader and 
thinker. His sympathies are with the poor, oppressed 
people of the county, and he votes to better their condition. 
He has for the past t'our years been a member of the Pop- 
ulist party, thinking this the best party to act with looking 
to the betterment of our financial system. A man well 
informed on general subjects, liberal in his views and social 
to an eminent degree. He was born in Franklin county, 
Indiana, on the 21st day of March, 1825, son of William 
and Isabel (Chance) Potts, who came to Hancock county 
in an early day. William Potts, Sr., was born in Virginia 
in 1786 and died in 1874. ^^^^ ^^^^ ^^^ born in North 
Carohna, and died in 1878, aged about that of her hus- 
band, eighty-seven years. They are buried at the Little 
Sugar-Creek cemetery. 

William Potts, Jr., was married to a half sister of the 
late Governor Abram A. Hammond, of Indiana, her maiden 
name being Martha A. Hammond. She was born Octo- 
ber 31, 1825. She died May 24, 1890, and is buried at 
Greenfield. A grand, good woman, who lived to raise her 
family and see the vast changes in the county before she 
died. 

The following are the names of Mr. and Mrs. Potts' 
children: James K., died April 12, 1865. George W., 
born May 14, 1850 ; married to Lucy B. Hayden. Mary 
E., married to P. K. Boyd. He died in 1895. Edwin, 
born December 17, 1854; c^ied November 18, 1889. John 
W.,born February i, 1857; married to Rebecca F. Els- 
bury. Isabel IL, born July 9, 1859; r"^i"ned to A. J. 
Reynolds. Alice A., married to Johnson R. Abbott. Lucy, 
born March 5, 1864; single, at home. 

THE MEEK FAMILY. 

It is a duty as well as a pleasure to write of the Meek 
family, who came to the county in its infancy and for so 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 343 

many years so conspicuous. The elder Meek, Jeremiah, 
was born in Maryland in 1789. He was married to Miss 
Cornvvell, of Kentucky. She, with her parents, came to 
Wayne county, Indiana. Mr. and Mrs. Jeremiah Meek 
were married about the yeiw 181 1. He was appointed 
Judge of the Wayne County Probate Court by the Terri- 
torjal Governor, W. H. Harrison, in 1812. He served two 
terms of seven years each and held a like position in 
Hancock county for seven years, making in all twenty-one 
years as Judge. There was born to this marriage six 
children as follows: First child, Bazil, married to Polly 
Irven. He died in Missouri, aged seventy years. Second 
child, Anna, married to Mr. Parsons ; died in 1852 and is 
buried at Greenfield. Third child, Cornwell, born in 
Kentucky ; married to Miss Pierson ; died at the age of 
seventy-five years and is buried at Greenfield. Fourth 
child, Margaret, married to Nathan Crawford ; both dead 
and are buried at Greenfield. She died in i860. Fifth 
child, Joshua, born in Kentucky ; married to Julia A. Rus- 
sell. He died in Kansas in 1885 ; she died in 1894. Sixth 
child, Moses, married to Eliza A. Meek. He died in 
1855 ; she in 1893 ; buried at Greenfield. 

A few years after the death of his wife, Mr. Jeremiah 
Meek married Catherine Williams, who was born in North 
Carolina in 1803. This marriage is thought to be about 
the year 1820. Nine children were born to this marriage, 
as follows: First child, Mar}^ M., married to William H. 
Summers. He died in 1843 ; she in 1851. She was born 
in Wayne county, Indiana. Second child, William W., 
born in Wayne count}-, Indiana, in 1822 ; married to Celia 
A. Hunt. He died in 1867. She is living (1895) in Mis- 
souri. Third child, John F., born in Wayne county, 
Indiana, in 1824; married to Eliza J. Hunt in 1848; one 
child born to them. She died in 185 1. He was the second 
time married to Sarah A. Hunt in 1852. She was born in 
1833 in Hancock county, Indiana. Their children's names 



H4 



THE PIONEERS OF 



are Herman O., Surthney L., Eliza J., deceased, Darly, 
deceased, James E., Bertha, deceased, Bazil,Jared, John 
F. and Alpha M. This family resides in Chillicothe, Mo. 
He was in the Mexican war. Fourth child of Jermiah 
Meek, Terressa B., born in Wayne county, Indiana, in 
1826 ; married to John R. Malory. She died in Philadel- 
phia, Indiana, in 1856; buried at Greenfield. Fifth child, 
Jared C, the first to be born in Greenfield, June 15, 1828 ; 
married first to Martha Crockett in 1852. She died, Jan- 
uary 9, 1883, and is buried in Green county, Ohio. Their 
children's names are Alexander C, James A., John C, 
William F., Nancy J. and Elizabeth. Jared C. Meek was 
the second time married to Mrs. Rebecca West, born in 
Knightstown, Indiana, in 1832, daughter of Thomas B. 
and Margaret (Wright) Miller. Mr. Meek resides in 
Greenfield, and has all his life, and is a blacksmith by 
trade. He was in the army. Company G, Ninth Indiana 
Calvary. Sixth child, Rachel C, born in Greenfield in 
1830 ; married to Moses Turk. He died. She is living 
(1895) in Greenfield. Seventh child, Rebecca A., born in 
Greenfield in 1832 ; married first to John Willett ; second 
time to Thomas Osborn ; living in Greenfield. Eighth 
child, Sarah E., born in Greenfield in 1834 > ^^^^ ^^ Union 
county, Indiana, in 1841. Ninth child, Larinda, born in 
Greenfield, in 1838 ; married to Joseph Estus ; reside in 
Mt. Comfort, Indiana. 

Jeremiah Meek died in Greenfield in 1839, respected 
by all. He was licensed to preach the gospel, as will be 
seen by the following : 

Jeremiah Meek is hereby authorized to preach the gospel 
in the M. E. Church according to the rules and regulations of 
said church. 

Given under my hand, this 27th day of July, 1S16. 

JOHN SALE, P. E. 

JAMES THOMAS, SR. 

Mr. Thomas came to Jackson township, a strong young 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 345 

man, in 1850, and at once commenced work in the green 
woods to make a farm, which he did after years of patience 
and toil. He was married to Sophronia McCray in 1850, 
daughter of EHjah and Nancy (Hiiffom) McCra}^ born 
May II, 1828, near Knightstown, Indiana. Mr. Thomas 
was born in l^ush county, Indiana, March 21, 1827, son of 
WilHam F. and Naomi Thomas, who came to Hancock 
county in 1854. ^^ '^^'^^ born in Connecticut in 1795, and 
died February 24, 1872. She died April 31, 1872. She 
was born in Ohio in 1800. They were married October 5, 
1820. Both buried at Knightstown, Indiana. Mr. and 
Mrs. Thomas are members of the Christian Church, and for 
the past seven years have resided in Greenfield. Mr. T. 
has been one of the strong men of the county, is fond of 
early sports and log-rolling days, and well informed on 
early times. His parents came early to Rush county, and 
were pioneers there until 1854. Mrs. James Thomas' 
father, Elijah McCray, was born in Ohio in 1800 ; died 
May, 1871. She died September 12, 1878; born in 1807. 
Both buried at the old Baptist Church at New Columbus. 

The following are the names of James Thomas' chil- 
dren : William M., born February, 1851 ; married to Alice 
S. Barrett. Mr. Thomas was elected County Commiss- 
sioner in 1892, re-elected in 1894, and to-day (1895) is 
serving to the entire satisfaction of the people who elected 
him. He resides in Jackson township, where he owns a 
line farm, under a high state of cultivation. He belongs 
to the Christian Church and Masonic order, to which he is 
strongly welded. Nancy E., born June 6, 1855 ; died 
October 6, 1856; buried at Knightstown. John H., born 
November 9, 1857 ; died September 25, 1870, and is buried 
at Knightstown. Leonadas R., born July 21, 1861 ; mar- 
ried to Maggie McCray ; reside on the old home place, 
where James Thomas built his brick house in 1878. 

Names of William M. Thomas' children : Emma F., 
born in 1873 ; died September 29, 1892. She is buried at 



34^ THE PIONEERS OF 

Knightstown. Mary Ida, born in 1875 ; married to Wil- 
liam Kirk. Fanny B., at home. Roxey J., at home. 

Following is an obituary notice of Emma F. Thomas, 
published soon after her death : 

Emma Florence Thomas, daughter of William M. and Alice 
Thomas, died of catarrhal fever at her father's residence, four 
miles north of Cleveland, September 29, 1S93. She was born 
September i, 1873, aged nineteen 3'ears and twenty -nine days. 

It seems so sad to think that one just blooming into woman- 
hood should be called away. When Emma died the life of a 
conscientious, noble, kind and aflectionate young lady went 
out. We can not understand why it is that the aged and 
infirmed, those who seem to have lived out their days of use- 
fulness, are spared, and those who are so young are called 
way. Yet, it must be right, God is too wise to err and too 
good to do wrong. Emma's life on earth was short, but deeply 
imprinted with fond, affectionate remembrance. She was 
always kind and obedient to her parents and gentle and loving 
to her sisters ; and she left behind her marks worthy of imita- 
tion. We are sorry to see our friends, those with whom we 
have so long associated, called away ; but every day we live 
we are reminded that death is abroad in our land ; that imita- 
tion is written upon everything we behold ; that there is no 
escaping the summons. It was hard, so hard, to speak the last 
farewell and take the last look upon Emma. We know her 
sufferings are over, and she is at rest with her Savior. She 
will be missed by all who know her, but oh, so sadly missed 
by her kind parents and loving sisters, who will listen in vain 
for her loved voice, and look with sad yearning toward the 
vacant chair. Never again on earth will we hear that sweet 
voice, nor see her loving smiles. But our farewells have not 
been spoken forever. It is needless to say that Emma received 
all possible care that human hands could give. Many happy 
hours have I spent in her presence, but I shall spend them no 
more, for she has gone never to return. The family circle is 
broken. That gentle and loving voice, so often heard, shall 
never be heard on earth again. That silent step no more is 
sounded on the ffoor. Those pale lips that were kissed and 



34^ THE PIONEERS OF 

shed tears over will never be seen again. She leaves two 
grandfathers, two grandmothers, a father, mother, three sisters 
and a host of other relatives to mourn her loss. Her funeral 
was preached by Elder J. B. Blount at then* residence. Her 
remains were followed by a large number of relatives and 
friends to the Glencove cemetery, October ist. Father, mother 
and sisters, no longer mourn, for your loss is Emma's eterna 
gain. 

We miss thee from our home, dear ; 
We miss thee from thy place ; 

A shadow o'er our life is cast ; 

We miss the sunshine of thy face. 

We miss thy kind and willing hand, 

Thy fond and earnest care ; 
Our home is dark without thee — 

We miss thee everywhere. 

We loved her, yes, we loved her. 

But there's one who loved her more, 

And he has gently called her 
To yonder shining shore. 

Ada F. Thornburg. 
DAVID THOMAS AND FAMILY. 

Of this large and interesting family I wish to give a 
sketch in the Pioneer. One so deserving I can not forget. 
In 1881 I first met Mr. and Mrs. David Thomas at their 
home in Jackson township, where their best daj^s were 
spent, and where their best endeavors were put forth to 
make a home in the then new count}', back in the thirties. 
Mr. Thomas was married to Mary Jones in 1835. 

Children's names : Jane, married to Sanford Wil- 
liams ; reside in Jackson township. Mary, married to 
Marion Forgey ; both dead. Lucien B., married to Juliet 
Fort ; reside in Jackson township, near the Simmons ceme- 
tery. John W., married to Miss L. Gorgey. Morris C, 
married to Caroline Wilson, daughter of Peter Wilson ; 
reside in Jackson township. Martin Rile}^ married to 
Ellen Barrett ; reside in Jackson township, near Willow 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 349 

Branch, Ollie L., married to Kanan White ; reside near 
Maple Valley, Henry county, Indiana. Frances, married 
to William Fort. William S., married to Mag Huston. 
She is dead. 

David Thomas was born in Ohio, September 14, 1814. 
Mrs. Thomas was born in Ohio in 1815. He died July 12, 
1884. She died December 7, 1891. Both are buried at 
the Willow Branch cemetery. They were Methodists, as 
are most of the children. 

Their children were born as follows : Mariah J. , 1836 ; 
Mary E., December i, 1839 ; Lucien B., November 4, 1841 ; 
John W., November 12, 1843 ; Morris C, April 11, 1846; 
Martin R., April 23, 1848; Ollie L., August 16, 1850; 
Margaret O., October 4, 1853; Frances L., December o, 
1855 ; William S., August 16, 1858. 

Below will be found a sketch of Mrs. Thomas at the 
time of her death : 

Mary Thomas, daughter of John and Mary Jones, was 
born in Clermont county, Ohio, June 15, 1S14, and died Decem- 
ber 7, 1S91, aged seventy-seven years, five months and twenty- 
two days. At the age of thirteen she moved with her parents 
to Rush county, Indiana, where she was married to David 
Thomas, November 19, 1S35. In the fall of 1S3S she, with her 
husband and one little daughter, moved to Hancock county, 
Indiana, where they lived a happy and peaceful life for nearly 
a half century, when her husband, on the I3th day of July, 
18S4, was called from labor to reward. Eight children were 
given to them as the fruit of this union, five sons and three 
daughters, wdio are still living, death having broken no links in 
the chain of the family circle. She united with the M. E. 
Church at the age of sixteen, and was a faithful and accepta- 
ble member for more than sixty -one years, when the summons 
came and called her to the shores on the other side. In her 
last Illness she was stricken with paralysis, September 29, 1S91, 
from which she lingered for many weeks, fully realizing her 
condition, knowing that the disease might prove fatal at any 
moment, but alwa3's expressed a willingness to either live or 
die. Through all her afibctions she was patient and composed, 



350 THE PIONEERS OF 

never heard to murmur or complain, but at all times her lips 
seemed to be moving in praises of Jesus, frequently expressing 
herself as hearing the Lord speaking to her. A few days pre- 
vious to her death, w^hen asked if there w^as anything she 
wanted, she looked heavenward and whispered, " Yes ; I want 
my spirit to take its flight ; I want Jesus to take me now. 
It seems but a step into heaven," and then crossed over. We 
do not think of her as being dead, but as one gone above to 
join the blood-washed throng on the other side, and sing the 
song of redemption for ever and ever. 

JOHN GREEN, SR. 

The memory of John Green must not be overlooked in 
the Pioneer, as he was among the first to come to Green 
township, Hancock county, and who the township was 
named after, and lived here for many years, long enough 
to see the locality emerge from the green woods to a com- 
paratively well improved community. He came poor, yet 
rich, for he was blessed with a strong constitution and 
determination to make a home in the West. He was 
greatly assisted in his eftbrts by his wife, who is a true 
helpmeet. Mr. Green was born in Maryland, March 4, 
1792. He was married in Kentucky in 1816 to Jane Whar- 
ton, who was also born in 1782. He died December 8, 
1859; buried in Missouri. Mrs. Green died August 31, 
1862 ; buried at Eden, Indiana. 

The following are the names of Mr. and Mrs. Green's 
children: Daniel, born in Kentucky in 1817 ; married to 
Mariah Chadrick. He died in Missouri in 1867. Wil- 
liam, born in Kentucky, October 6, 182 1 ; married to Mary 
Chadrick ; reside in Idaho. Nathaniel, born November 3, 
1823 ; married to Sarah Hanger. She died in 1859 ' ^^^ 
died in 1893 in Iowa. Margaret, born in 1827 ; married to 
Robert Morris. She died in Missouri in 1894. James, 
born April 22, 1832 ; married to Sarah J. Brown. He died 
in 1864, and is buried at Eden, Indiana. John W., born 
February 9, 1834; married to Rachel E. Pauley, August 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 35 1 

12, 1858. Children's names are John W., born in 1859; 
Wilhird 0., married to Dora Kessler in 1893, and Otto C, 
born in 1871 ; died in 1881 ; buried at the Eden cemetery. 
Thomas, born April 5, 1837 5 (^ied in Missouri in 1871. 

WILLIAM WATTS AND FAMILY. 

The Watts famil}' came to Hancock county in the year 
1825, and settled on Blue River, eight miles south-east of 
Greenfield, in what is known as Hominy Ridge, where it 
resided many years, and where some of the representatives 
live to-day (1895). William Watts, the elder, was born in 
Butler county, Ohio, in 1800, and on the 12th day of July, 
1824, he was married to Mary T3'ner in Shelby county, 
Indiana. She was born, April 8, 1797, and died, October, 
1891. He died, June 18, 1871. Both buried at the Shiloh 
cemetery, near the old home. This worthy couple were 
truly pioneers, and underwent all the privations incident to 
frontier life. Both lived, however, to see plenty smile 
upon them and better times, Mrs. W. living to the grand 
old age of ninet^'-five years, even to see the gas era. They 
will be remembered as a worthy couple, who figured in the 
early settlement of the Blue-River country. 

The following are the names of their children, as given 
me by the fourth child, William H. Watts, now living near 
the scenes of his childhood : Eliza, born in 1825 ; married 
to Hiram Tyner ; both deceased, and buried at the Hinch- 
man cemetery. Harriet, born in 1826; married to James 
R. Duncan. She is living (^1895). John P., born August 
28, 1827 ; married to Mar}- J. Catt. He died in 1875, ^"^ 
is buried at Shiloh cemetery. She afterwards married John 
O. G. Collins. He died in 1895, and is buried at Gilboa 
cemetery. William H., born June 21, 1829; married to 
Minerva J. Kiger, September 5, 1850. She was born in 
1832, daughter of John and Sarah (Greenup) Kiger. The 
following are the names of William H. Watts' children : 
America, John W., Missouri and Perry W., deceased. He 



352 THE PIONEERS OF 

is buried at Shiloh cemetery. Elizabeth, the tifth cliild of 
William Watts, was born October 9, 183 1 ; married to 
Hawkins. He died in 1864 ; buried at Mt. Lebanon cem- 
etery. They were married in 1851. George W., born 
February 6, 1833 ; married to Mary Allen, She died in 
1884 ; buried at the Shiloh cemetery. Henry W., died in 
infancy. Sarah A., born October 16, 1838; married to 
Albert Kelley. Jefferson M., born May 22, 1840; single. 
George W. was in the war of 1861-5. A grand fam- 
ily that we must not lose sight of. Mrs. William Watts 
was a member of the Christian Church, as well as her son, 
William H., to whom I am indebted for the above facts, as 
well as a sketch written by him on the early settlement of 
Hominy Ridge. The family was largely Democratic. 

JOSHUA LYNAM 

Resides fiv'e miles east of Greenfield, on the National 
road, in Jackson township. He was born in Ohio, July 5, 
1830, son of William and Luc}' (Taylor) L3'nam. William 
Lynam was born in Maryland. Mrs. Lucy Lynam was 
born in Ohio. They were married in 1828, and came to 
Hancock county in 1838. He died February 6, 1876; she 
died March 15, 1892; buried at Gilboa cemeterj^ Joshua 
Lynam was first married to Julia E. Barrett, November, 
1852, daughter of Edw^ard and Abigail (Lamay) Barrett. 
She was born in 1833 ; is buried at the Gilboa cemetery. 
Two children were born to this marriage, William E., born 
in 1853 ; married first to Hettie Grass ; the second time to 
Annie Gordon. Sarah, born in 1857 ; married to Mr. 
Crider. Mr. Lynam was the second time married to Mrs. 
Garey Hoel, October 27, 1877. She was born in Rush 
county, Indiana, in 1852, daughter of Peter and Jane 
(Wilson) Mauz}^ Garey Hoel died in 1871, and is buried 
at Mechanicsburg, Indiana, son of the late G. W. Hoel, of 
Madison county, Indiana. Two children were born to 
Mr. and Mrs. Garey Hoel— Nelly J., born in 1869; 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 353 

married to Mr. Goodpaster, of Delaware county, Indiana ; 
Susan, born in 1871 ; married to Albert Faraut ; reside in 
Anderson, Indiana. 

Joshua Lynam owns a splendid farm, and he and his 
wife enjoy life to the fullest extent. They belong to the 
Methodist Church. He is a Republican, and a gentleman, 
first, last and all the time. 

JOHN O. G. COLLINS. 

Mr. Collins was born in Ohio in 1828, and came to 
Rush county, Indiana, in 1832, where he lived to manhood, 
185 1. He was first married to Elizabeth Johns, daughter 
of David Johns, a pioneer of Hancock county, Indiana. 
Mrs. Collins died, August, 1874, and is buried at Gilboa 
cemetery. Mr. Collins died October 13, 1895, and is also 
buried at Gilboa cemetery. This worthy couple lived 
together about seventeen years. 

Following are the names of their children : Lavina, 
born in 1859; married to Richard Load. She died in 
Greenfield, and is buried there. Perry D., born October 
3, 1861 ; married first to Miss Coflield, daughter of Barney 
Coftield, September i, 1885. She died March 31, 1886; 
is buried at Shiloh cemetery. He was the second time 
married to Maggie J. Nelson, daughter of Harrison Nel- 
son, September 12, 1889. She was born in Rush county, 
Indiana, March 6, 1866. There were born two children, 
Harry, September 17, 1891, and one died in infancy. 
Perry D. is a member of the I. O. O. F., No. 399, at 
Arlington, Indiana, and delights in its noble teachings. 
He resides in East Greenfield, and to him I am indebted 
for the dates of the family. Third child, of J. O. G. Col- 
lins was Cassie, born May 11, 1865; married to John 
Buckner, of Rush county. She died July 1 1, 1889 ; buried 
at Arlington, Rush county. Fourth child, Delpha, born 

October 2, 1868 ; married to Nathan Iljnton ; live in Rush 
21 




MASONIC TEMPLE, GREENFIELD, IND. 
Erected, 1895. 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 355 

county. Fifth child, Elvira J., born in 1870 ; married to 
William Wilber ; reside in Greenfield. 

Mr. Collins was the second time married to Mrs. 
Watts, daughter of Mr, Catt. This event was in 1875. 
His first wife was born in Hancock county in 1830. Her 
mother's name before marriage was Osborn, an early pio- 
neer of Blue-River township. Mr. Collins served ten 
years as Justice of the Peace, was a Mason of high stand- 
ing, a polished gentleman, and a writer of ability. He 
was well informed on general subjects, and a man that left 
his mark in society, and whose place will be hard to fill. 
Glad to give the family a notice in my work. 

Following will be found an obituary, written at the 
time of his death : 

It is with sorrow that we record the death of our esteemed 
friend, J. O. G. Collins, which occurred last Sunday night at 12 
o'clock, after several weeks' ilhiess of stomach and liver trouble. 
Mr. Collins was a man of sterling worth and qualities that 
made him friends wherever he was known, and he was per- 
haps as well known as any man in the county. There was no 
man in Blue-River township better respected than he. He 
was a good citizen, and always dealt fairly with his fellow-men. 
When young he was an enthusiastic Mason, but he was a lover. 
of home ties, and when he became so situated that he was 
isolated from his Masonic brethren, he severed his connection 
with the fraternity in favor home. 

Mr, Collins was a zealous christian, and in his younger 
years was an able exhorter. He has lived in Hancock county 
over thirty years, and in all that time no one can say ought 
against him or his dealings with his fellows. He contributed 
articles to the Democrat from time to time, which were always 
read with interest. He was an influential Democratic politi- 
cian of the Jacksonian stripe, but limited or no aspirations for 
office or self-aggrandizement. He was born in 1828, and was 
consequently sixty-seven years old at the time of his death. 
His funeral occurred from his home, in Blue-River township, 
yesterday morning, conducted by his pastor. Rev. Martin, of 
the M. P. Church, and his interment at Gilboa cemetery, south of 



356 THE PIONEERS OF 

Cleveland. Another good man has gone, and thus is the scrip- 
tures fulfilled. He leaves a wife and three children. 

LETTER FROM W. H. WATTS. 

Hominy Ridge, January 8, 1896. 

My Esteemed Friend Harden : According to promise 
I drop you a few items and dates of this locality, situated in the 
extreme south-east part of Hancock county, Indiana, eight miles 
from the city of Greenfield, and bordering on Blue River. No 
wonder the early settlers were attracted to this part of the 
county, for it had many advantages over other parts. Back in 
the twenties a few noble men and women had the courage to 
settle here, poor and without means to any extent. They came 
strong and determined, and their best efforts were put forth to 
make a home. The ax and maul sounded in the dark, deep 
woods. Little cabins were built, rude in apperance, yet serv- 
ing the purpose of that day. Soon a school-house was built, 
and a few children gathered there to learn the early lessons of 
A, B, C. It was at this place that the name of Hominy Ridge 
originated, from the fact that many of the children brought 
that article for dinner, which was, in some cases, eaten without 
salt. Soon the little fields grew larger, better houses were 
built, and plenty came in its own good time. The log-rollings 
were not without their interest. The people were social, all on 
an equality, hardy and contented, and needed but little in those 
days. 

Among the early settlers in this neighborhood I call to 
mind John Osborn, Elijah Tyner, who kept the first store here, 
a grand, good man. He died, I think, about 1869 or 1870, and 
is buried at the Shiloh cemetery, where a monument marks his 
grave. Solomon Tyner, Robert Mofiitt, Mark Whitaker, James 
Osborn, Henry Duncan, George Penwell, John Trent, Daniel 
Smith, Robin Johns, Wilson Johns, Tyner family. Wolfs and 
Dr. Beatty. The first marriage I call to mind was William 
Wolf and Tobitha Tyner. The first post-office was in 1833, 
kept by Elijah Tyner. The first church was a Baptist, and the 
members met at private houses and in a log house until 1850, 
when the present church, known as Siiiloh, was built, and for 
years has been a very popular place for meetings. It was here 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 357 

that the late Wilson Thompson displayed his wonderful pow- 
ers as a preacher and speaker, as well as the late David Cald- 
well, John Sparks and others of more or less fame. 

I must not forget a bear story, as my letter would fall far 
short without it. In 1S3S ni} self and brother were making a 
run-round in the woods, near the house, when our attention 
was attracted to a sow squealing near by. A mother bear and 
two cubs had made an uncerimonious attack on the old sow. 
Mother came running, with sleeves rolled up and ax in hand, 
but her courage at this moment failed, as the old bear made for 
her, mouth open. She ran, caught her foot in a root, fell, and 
laid in this position until the bear went away. The infant set- 
tlement was aroused, and pursued the mother bear, which was 
captured a few miles east, at College Corner. The cubs were 
never heard from. The early days were not without their 
interest. The quiltings, apple parings and singing schools 
were of deep interest to me. The time, sixty-five years, seems 
short to look back, but is really a long time. Oh, how many 
have died since then. But few remain here now. Grand and 
sorrowful changes have come and gone since 1S25. 

I am glad you are writing up the early days and people of 
our now grand county. Should the next sixty years develop 
as much, it will be a grand place to live. Thanks to you for 
the deep interest you have taken. Unborn children will thank 
you in years to come. W. H. WATTS. 

LETTER FROM JOHN W. GREEN. 

Dear Readers of the Pioneer : As I have promised a 
siiort sketch for this work, I will give you a history of the 
hardships and privations which our family underwent on first 
emigrating to the State of Indiana : 

My father and uncle, Arthur Pinty, moved to this State 
from Kentucky in October, 1827. They did not come by rail- 
road nor in buggies, but just loaded their household goods and 
families in wagon, hitched two yoke of oxen to it, and started 
for Indiana, the far-ofl^ country at that time. They came as far 
as Rush county. As it proved to be a very rainy fall, they 
concluded to winter there. In the month of February they 
took their guns and a pack of provisions on their backs and 



358 THE PIONEERS OF 

started to look at the country. As all the low land was covered 
with water, they had to do considerable wading, so it was not 
very pleasant traveling, but in due time they arrived at Jesse 
Lane's, on Fall Creek. There were at that time several fami- 
lies in that neighborhood, consisting of the Hidays, Holhdays, 
Fosters and others. As they liked the country very well, they 
returned to Rush county. The roads were so bad, they loaded 
my father's goods and family, and started the latter part of 
February for the promised land. They got as far as section 
seventeen, township seventeen, range seven, Hancock county, 
in the evening of March 4, 182S. Their team was given out, 
so they thought the best thing they could do was to strike 
camp. The next morning the snow was about three feet deep. 
Things looked pretty gloomy to tackle, but as it was a nice 
place, they concluded to settle there, so the}^ went to work to 
build a house. There was plenty of small cherry and poplar 
close at hand, and the second night they slept in the new house. 
They chinked the cracks and built a mud chimney the next two 
days, and then my father and uncle started for his family. My 
mother, three little brothers, baby sister, one cow, four head of 
sheep and a four-year-old mare were left in the wilderness. When 
night came on and the wolves began lo howl my mother said 
she would have given everything she possessed if she could 
have been back in Rush county. They had to take the sheep 
in the house to keep the wolves from catching them. Father 
and uncle arrived in due time with uncle's family, and settled 
in section eight, township seventeen, range seven east, about 
forty rods from father, on the place now owned by John ShuU, 
and right now I must say I think they had two as nice locations 
as there are in Green township. 

Now, all this time the stock had nothing to eat, only what 
it could forage, and the sheep had to be kept close to the house 
on account of the wolves. Father cleared three acres and 
planted it in corn in good time, and brushed out three acres 
more and planted it about the first of July, yet it made very 
good corn. By this time he was out of breadstuft", so he went 
on foot to Blue River, and dug in a mill-race from daylight till 
dark for fifty cents a day, and took it in breadstuff'. He then 
walked home to get his ox team to g^o after it. It took one day to 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 359 

go and two to come home with the load. He tied a chunk of 
fire on his wagon to keep the musquitoes off. There were no 
matches then to strike fire with. What would we think if we 
had to live that way now ? Boys, be good to your parents. 
You do not know what they have done for you. 

Father and uncle were hauling a load of household goods 
from Wayne county to Willow Branch, when one of the axle 
skeins got loose, and they jacked the wagon up, took off the 
wheel and fixed it. Uncle said that would do, but father hit it 
one more lick, and the jack gave way and the point of the axle 
fell on the instep of uncle's foot. Father said he never heard a 
man halloo so in his life, but he soon released him. It always 
made a cripple of him to some extent. 

Uncle was not much for work. He cleared some and 
hunted for deer. He killed eighty-four deer the first year he 
was here. He then sold his claim to Uncle William Records, 
and moved down on Fall Creek, and from there to the Wabash 
River, near Utica. His whole family is dead ; not one left to 
tell the tale. 

Uncle William Records moved his family here from Ken- 
tucky. He was energetic, and cleared out quite a farm. His 
family consisted of six girls and four boys. In the winter of 
1S43 we had a fatal fever that took uncle, one son and two 
daughters. At this time there are but three of the family left. 

Father prospered and cleared out quite a farm. He had 
240 acres of good land in the fall of 1S51. He sold to Michael 
Crist, of Ohio, and in 1S53 moved to Scotland county, Missouri, 
where he settled for a short time, and then moved to Schuyler 
county, same State, and died, December, 18:^9. Mother lived 
in Missouri and Iowa until 1S62, and then came to my house, 
in Green township, and died. Father's family consisted of six 
sons and one daughter, who have all passed over the river of 
life except myself and one brother. He is the second eldest, 
and is in his seventy-fourth year. He resides at Rathdrum, 
Idaho, just at the foot of the Rocky Mountains, in the Spokane 
Valley. I have been there and saw the country, but give me 
Indiana first to live in. I was born February 9, 1S34, therefore 
I will soon be sixty-two years old. I am the oldest person 
living in the township that was born here, and I live on the 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 36 1 

farm adjoining the one on wliicli I was born, I have been 
absent from the county fourteen years in the Western States, 
but now I have made up my mind to bve and die in Indiana. 

I will give you a sketch of a ride I had on the Mississippi 
River. William Tomler and wife, John Burns and myself, in 
March, iSc;^, went in the river bottom on the Iowa side to 
pre-empt some land, therefore we had to sleep on it one night, 
and it was pretty cold. The next morning we went to the 
river to wash our hands and faces. We saw something float- 
ing down the river in the ice, and took our skift and pulled out 
to it. It was a good ferryboat, worth $600, but there was about 
one acre of ice frozen to it, and we could not manage it, so I 
told the two to go and bring the axes and I would stay on the 
boat and hold possession. By the time they got back to where 
we had started, the wind got so hard they could not come to 
me, and I had to remain on the boat six hours before any one 
could get to me to take me off, so I drifted down about ten 
miles and had to walk back next day. I let the boat go to the 
devil. 

In 1S5S I was married to Rachel E. Pauley, daughter of 
Joseph Pauley, a pioneer of this county. He came to Green- 
field in an early day. It had only a few log houses in it at 
that time. He was married to Rebecca Sutton and moved to 
Brandywine. From there he moved to Lick Creek, in 
Madison county, in 1S37, and in 1842 he moved to Green town- 
ship, where he died in 1865, respected by all who knew him. 

And now, Mr. Harden, if you think this worthy of space 
in your book you can publish it. I will say right here I was 
never in a school-house a day in my life to attend school. Now, 
young men, I will tell you something I did when I was sixteen 
years old that you couldn't do now. I walked from Dayton, 
Ohio, to the Mississippi River and never crossed a railroad. 
Yours truly, JOHN W. GREEN. 

THOMAS WILLIAMS, 

A man that was in eighteen battles of the war of 
1861-5, shall not go unnoticed in my work. He enlisted 
in Company I, Seventh Indiana Regiment, Colonel Gaven, 
in 1861, served three years, and was discharged at Indian- 



362 THE PIONEERS OF 

apolis, September 11, 1864. He was severely wounded at 
the siege of Vicksburg, and the Government has not for- 
gotten such a gallant soldier. Among the battles he was 
in are Vicksburg, Mine Run, Gettysburg and Antietam. 
Tom was married first to Miss Estucla E. Moore, June 22, 
1865. She was born October 24, 1848, and died July 3, 

1879- 

Mr. Williams was the second time married to Cora D. 

Hackelman, April 11, 1880, daughter of John F. and Mary 
E. (Lineback) Hackelman. She was born July 12, 1861. 
Thomas is a son of the late Wesley and Catherine (Har- 
din) Williams, and was born September 11, 1842, in 
Jackson township. Names of his children born of the 
second marriage: John W., born July 6, 1861 ; Virgil, 
born May 29, 1883. Mr. and Mrs. Williams are members 
of the M. P. Church. They reside eight miles north-east 
of Greenfield, where they own a fine farm and dwelling. 

DANIEL LEE. 

Dan was born near Perkinsville, Indiana, in 1847, son 
of Joseph Lee, an early citizen of Jackson township, who 
lived and died there. He was twice married, the first time 
to Miss King, who died about the year 1845 ; the second 
time to Miss Ashb3% Seven children were born to him. 
Daniel was of the second set of children. He learned the 
blacksmithing trade in the State of Iowa, and has worked 
at it and tarming since he was sixteen years of age. He 
is a fine workman and good farmer, as his fine farm, two 
miles south-west of the city of Greenfield will attest. He 
resides there, and a part of his time is devoted to black- 
smithing, where he has a shop. He was married in 1873 
to Miss Rodgers, a handsome lady, who was also raised 
in Jackson township. Two children, Charles and Elmer, 
were born to them about the years 1874 ^^^ 1876, bright, 
active, young men, just entering strong manhood. 

Mr. Daniel Lee is a Democrat, but does not belong to 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 363 

any church. He has a host of friends in Madison county, 
where he was born and resided most of his Hfe. A tiptop 
gentleman three hundred and sixty-five days in the year. 
Call and see him as you pass by. 

JOHN CUMMINS, 

One of the prosperous young men I want to mention, 
is a son of Perry and Parmelia (McCarty) Cummins. He 
w^as born near Alfont, Indiana, about the year 1850 ; mar- 
ried Ella Cook, daughter of Crane and Eliza (Mingle) 
Cook. She was born about the year 185 1 in Green town- 
ship, near Menden. Mr. Cummins received a good com- 
mon education, which fitted him for business (mercantile), 
which he is now engaged in at Ingalls, a new town on the 
Big Four Railroad, just east of Alfont, where Mr. C. was 
in business for ten years before he went to Ingalls. He 
has built up a fine trade, and to-day (1895) has a fine, 
general assortment store, second to none in the county. 
He has served several years as postmaster and has given 
general satisfaction to the patrons. Qiiiet in his ways, 
well informed and a thorough gentleman three hundred 
and sixty-five days in the year. Call and see him when 
in Ingalls. Children's names: Richard, Roy, Virgil, 
Howard and Benn3% Mr. C. is a Republican and a free 
thinker. He was married about the year 1873 I think. 

DAVID HUSTON. 

My old friend Dave was born near Alfont about the 
year 1842, Justin time to make a capital soldier, which he 
was for a period of three years during our late war of 
1861-65. He was in Company K, Eighth Indiana Volun- 
teers. He is a son of William Huston, an early citizen of 
Green township on Lick Creek, where Dave first saw the 
light of day. He is a fine mechanic (carpenter), at which 
he has worked many years. At present (1895) he is at 
the Soldiers' Home at Marion, Indiana, where he has a 
position for a number of years. 



364 THE PIONEERS OF 

Mr. Huston is a capital good fellow, popular with the 
soldier boys, for whom he always has a warm grasp of the 
hand. His fine flowing beard you must see to admire. 
Even Aaron's beard could not surpass it. He was married 
the first time to Miss Jones; second time to Prudence 
Cummins ; third time to Miss Patterson, daughter of the 
late Eli Patterson, of near Menden, Indiana. His first two 
wives are deceased. Dave is a Republican and a member 
of the G. A. R. Shake with Dave when you see him. 
Enlisted in 1861 ; discharged August 28, 1865. 

MILTON D. MASTERS. 

Mr. Masters was born in Franklin county, Indiana, 
August 2, 1864, son of Jacob and Elsa (Curry) Masters ; 
both born in Franklin county, Indiana, and were married 
there. Jacob Masters and nearly all his sons are black- 
smiths. The lather and one son have been working at 
Warrington, Indiana, since 1884, and to-day (1896) are 
doing a large business. Milton D. learned the smithing 
business also, and in his younger days worked at it, but 
for the past eight years (since the gas era) he has been en- 
gaged with Dr. R. D. Hanna in digging gas wells in 
Hancock and adjoining counties, and the firm is well and 
favorably known as one of the best in the county, and if 
they don't strike gas there is none. He was married to 
Luna Francis White in 1895. She is the daughter of John 
W. White, who resides near Shirley, Indiana, near the 
Henry count}^ line. 

Mr. Masters is a very clever gentleman, has mixed 
much wath the people and is a fine talker. If you have a 
gas well to dig don't look any farther than the firm of 
Hanna & Masters, Warrington, Indiana. 

ELIJAH S. COOPER, 

A native of Kentucky, was born in the year 1804, 
and at the age of twenty was married to Berrilla Nowel. 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 365 

In the fall of 1830 he moved to Rush county, Indiana, and 
settled in the green woods on one hundred and sixty acres 
of land he entered from the Government. He resided 
there until 1836, when he moved to Hancock county, In- 
diana, and settled on a farm in Green township, where he 
resided until his death in the fall of 1865. He did not 
belong to any religious denomination, but in sentiment 
held with the Predestinarian Baptists. Mr. C. was the 
father of ten children, five sons and live daughters, all of 
whom have departed this life except two, one son and one 
daughter. 

The following are the names of Mr. Cooper's children : 
Lewis, born in Kentucky in 1824 ; married to Linender 
Rhue ; resides six miles north of Greenfield, Indiana. 
Berry W., born in Kentucky in 1828 ; married to Malissa 
Hoel in 1857 ; died in 1868 ; is buried at the Cooper cem- 
etery, near the old home. See his sketch on another 
page. Robert D. was Trustee for years. He died in 1884 
or 1885 ; is buried at the Cooper cemetery. Sanford, 
deceased. Harrison, married Mary A. Johnson. He is 
dead. Mary A., deceased. Martha, married to Dr. 
Passage ; resides in Peru, Indiana. Lucretia, married to 
Daniel Dobbins. She is deceased. Artemesia, married 
to T. T. Barrett. She is dead ; buried at the Cooper 
cemetery. All dead except Lewis and Martha Passage. 

LEWIS COOPER, 

The writer of this sketch, was born in Boone county, 
Kentucky, in the year 1824, and at 4he age of six years 
came to Indiana with his parents, and at the age of twelve 
years came to Hancock county, where he has resided ever 
since. He stayed with his parents until he was twenty-one 
years of age and helped his father clear up a tarm in the 
green woods. At the age of twenty-one years he was 
married to Miss Linender Rhue, daughter of Abraham 
Rhue, one of the early settlers of the county. 



266 THE PIONEERS OF 

Mr. Lewis Cooper, who wrote the above, resides six 
miles north of Greenfield and near Maxwell, also near the 
old Cooper homestead. The family came early to the 
county and were among the most prominent. Robert 
Cooper was a grand, good man, andforyears was Trustee 
of Center township. He died about the year 1884 or 1885 ; 
is buried, as well as other members of the Cooper family, 
at the Cooper cemetery, near Maxwell. Dr. B. W. 
Cooper, another son, was a physician of note and prac- 
ticed at Greenfield several years previous to his death, 
about the year 1878. He was married to Miss Hoel, 
daughter of the late G. W. Hoel, of Madison county, 
Indiana. She resides in Greenfield, Indiana. The family 
will long be remembered as one of the first in Hancock 

county. 

PETER S. BLAKE. 

Mr. B. was born in the State of Iowa, about the 3'ear 
1834. In the year 1852 he came to Adams township, 
Madison county, Indiana, and two or three years later was 
married to Minerva J. Justice, daughter of Hezekiah and 
Miss (Shelton) Justice. One child was born of this mar- 
riage, William R., about the year 1854. Mrs. Peter S. 
Blake died about the year 1855. ^^e is a sister of John 
J. Justice, Mary A. Seward and Elizabeth Sullivan. Mr. 
B. was the second time married to Nancy Collier, about 
the year 1857. She is a daughter of the late Perr}' Col- 
lier. She was born in 1839 '^^' 1840- 

The following are the names of their children : Mary 

E., married to Charts French ; reside at Orestes, Indiana. 

Joseph P., John H., Andrew J., Silas O. and Charles R. 

Mr. Blake is a fine farmer and a clever gentleman. I 

have known him long and well. He resides three miles 

north of Orestes, Indiana. Call and see Mr. and Mrs. 

Blake. 

SETH WALKER, 

Whose name heads this sketch, was one of the promi- 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 367 

nent men of his clay. He was born about the year 1800, 
and in his young days came to Lick Creek, in Hancock 
county, Indiana. He was married about the year 1825 
to Miss Childers, sister of 'Squire Childers. The Walker 
homestead w^as adjoining the town of Nashville, where 
the family resided many years. Mr. Walker was thrice 
married. Of the tirst set of children were Ira, Dove, 
Solon, ElizabethJ., Allen, Mrs. RachelNewman, Harry and 
Mrs. Dr. D. Cook, who died at Fishersburg, Indiana, in 
1873. Mr. Walker was married the second time to Mrs. 
Rodgers, about the year 1843. Children's names: Eliza, 
Jesse, Albert and Seth. Mrs. Walker died about the 
year 1859 ; is buried at the Hayes' cemetery. Mr. Walker 
was married the third time to Widow Cass. No children' 
were born to this marriage. 

Mr. Walker served as Justice of the Peace in Brown 
township for several years, and was elected County Com- 
missioner in 1836 for a term of years and served to the 
entire satisfaction of the people. He was a good farmer, 
and at his death (1862) was in good circumstances, made 
so by industry and frugality. He is buried at the Hayes 
cemetery in Brown township, near where he lived so long. 
He raised a large famil}^ all of whom are in fine circum- 
stances. Ira, Dove and Mrs. Newman reside in Kansas ; 
Solon, near Markleville, Indiana; Albert, near the old 
homestead ; Allen and Harvey, in the West ; Mrs. Cook, 

deceased. 

JOHN W. CULP. 

Mr. Culp was born in New Jersey December 14, 
1865, son of John H. Culp. He was married to Augusta 
Scull in 1885, on the ninth day of March. She was born 
in Massachusetts May 22, 1868. Her father's name was 
William Scull. Mother's name w^as Mollie Acker before 
marriage. John W., or Jack, as we call him, came to 
Pendleton in 1887, about the time gas was discovered. 
He has worked at glass-blowing nearly all his life, as did 



368 THE PIONEERS OF 

his father before him. Jack is a jolly, good fellow, makes 
friends and keeps them. Nothing little about Jack. Mrs. 
C. is a lady of many virtues, loves company and delights 
to have it. No home more pleasant than this. Two 
bright girls have been born to them, Ollie, in July, 1888, 
and Julia, in 1892. Mr. Culp is a member of the K. of 
P. lodge, of Pendleton, Indiana, where they reside. Call 
and see them and you will not regret it. Thanks to them 
for favors. 

ADAM L. BROWN. 

The Brown family must not be neglected, nor Adam, 
either, so we will give a short sketch of Adam L. Brown. 
He was born in Rush county, Indiana, February 25, 
1839, ^^^ °^ George W. Brown, a prominent man of 
Shelby county, Indiana, who was in the State Senate from 
that county back in the forties. He died in 1858 ; is buried 
in that county. Adam's mother's name before marriage 
was Elizabeth Trees. She died in November, 1870 ; is 
also buried in Shelby count}^ Adam L. was married to 
Cynthia Haftbrd in 1864. She died in 1866; is buried in 
Shelby county, Indiana. He was married the second 
time to Mary J. Porter, August, 1868, in Hancock county. 

Mr. Brown enlisted in Company E, Fifty-second 
Indiana Volunteers, in 1861. He served two years and 
was discharged at Indianapolis in 1863. He was elected 
Justice of the Peace lor Brandywine township in Novem- 
ber, 1894. Adam is a tiptop gentleman, and the scales of 
justice will balance all right in his hands. 

JOHN QUINLIN. 

My old friend and comrade was born in Ireland in 
1835, j^^st in time to make a capital soldier, as he was. 
He came to America in 1855, the home ol the freehand 
brave. He enlisted in Company G, Seventeenth Indiana 
Volunteers, at Anderson in 1864, and was in several battles, 
such as Mason, Selma, etc. He was a loyal boy in blue, 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES." 369 

and never tailed to come to time when duty called him. 
He was discharged at Indianapolis, Indiana, at the close 
of the war. He nev^er married and has spent most of his 
time in Madison county, Indiana, since he came to Amer- 
ica. Perhaps there is no man who has made more rods of 
ditch than Mr. Quinlin. A hard working man. If he 
ever finds your pocket-book you will get it again sure. 

S. A. TROY, M. D. 

Perhaps there is no man in the two counties better 
known than Dr. Troy, having spent his best years prac- 
ticing in both Madison and Hancock counties. He was 
born in Ohio, in 1827, on the twenty-ninth day of August, 
at Batavia, Clermont county. He learned the cabinet 
business in his bo3'hood days, and worked at it till about 
the year 1847, when he came to Anderson, Indiana, and 
clerked in the Siddall drug store. In 1849 he was married 
to Elizabeth Cory, daughter of Abner Cory, a native of 
North Carolina, who came to Madison county in 1838. 
Mrs. Troy died in 1852. In 1853 he was married to 
Martha Manning. He has practiced at New Columbus, 
Huntsville, Yorktown, Fortville, Willow Branch and Mil- 
ner Corner. At the latter place he is now living (1896). 

He graduated at the Indiana Medical School at 
Indianapolis in 1872. There is no better doctor than Mr. 
Troy. His long practice has given him opportvmities 
possessed by few men. His splendid physical makeup 
and fine conversational powers renders him an agreeable 
gentleman. He has been associated in practice with Drs. 
Stew^ard, Yancey, C. C. Pratt, Joel Pratt and others. He 
has always been popular with the people, and was elected 
to the Indiana State Legislature in 1890. He served to 
the entire satisfaction of all and for the good of the people, 
in whose interest he has always stood up for. A Democrat 
of the old school. He could not be o;hervvise. He be- 
longs to the Church of God, and is a fluent speaker in the 



370 " THE PIONEERS OF 

cause. Charles H. Troy is his son, who lives just west of 
Milner Corner, on the old William Collins farm. Dr. 
Troy is and has been a Mason of high standing for many 
years. 

JORDAN LACEY. 

The Lacey family came early to Hancock county, 
and became one of the prominent ones of the county. 
Jordan entered one hundred and sixty acres of land in 
1837, on which farm he died August 27, 1862. He was 
born in Virginia May 10, 1803 ; married to Winnie Live- 
ley, December i, 1825. She was born November 9, 1808. 
She died May 2, 1881 ; both buried at the Simmons ceme- 
ter}^ in Jackson township. A grand old couple, who came 
to the county and underwent hardships unknown to the 
people of 1896. They belonged to the Christian church, 
and will long be remembered as worthy pioneers of 
Hancock county. 

The following are the names of Jordan and Winnie 
Lacey's children : Bird, married to Caroline Reeves; re- 
side in Kansas. Warren, married to Minerva Haywood. 
He died in Nebraska in 1857. Morgan, married to Mary 
Adams. He died in Kansas in 1856. Maria, married to 
John Jordan : reside in Iowa. Dica, married to Milton 
McCray ; reside in Indianapolis. William P., born 
February 9, 1848 ; married Barbara M. Reeves. She 
was born in October, 1848, daughter of Benjamin Reeves, 
Sr. Harrison B., born 1850 ; died in 1878; is buried at 
Simmons cemetery. George W., married Sarah Fran- 
cis ; reside in Greenfield. 

All the children were born in Hancock county, 
Indiana, except the three older ones. I am indebted to 
William P. Lacey for the above dates, who resides on the 
old home farm, seven miles north-east of Greenfield, in 
Jackson township. Jordan Lacey was elected County 
Commissioner in 1847. 




CHARLES G. OFFUTT, 

Judge of the Hancock Circuit Court. 




JOHN Q^ WHITE, 
Representative. 



GEORGE W. HAM, 
Treasurer. 



372 THE PIONEERS OF 

DR. B. W. COOPER, 

Son of Elijah Cooper, was born in Kentucky in 1828. 
He came, with his parents, when quite young to Rush 
county, Indiana, and then to Hancock county, Indiana, a 
few years later. He worked on the farm and received a 
good, practical education. He studied medicine with Drs. 
Cook & Jones, and first commenced to practice at New 
Columbus (Ovid), Indiana, about the year 1854. ^^ ^^^ 
married to Malissa Hoel in 1857, daughter of George W. 
Hoel, of Adams township, Madison county, Indiana. She 
was born in Ohio in 1835, '^^^ came to Madison county 
when quite young. In 1858 Dr. Cooper removed to 
Greenfield, after graduating at the Rush Medical School, 
and at once commanded a fine practrice. A polished gen- 
tleman and a fine physician. He died in 1868 ; is buried 
at the Cooper cemetery. 

The following are the names of his children, all born 
in Greenfield and where they all reside (1896) : Daniel B., 
born in 1858 : married to Flora B. Marsh, daughter of 
Hon. Montgomery Marsh, of Greenfield. Brainard, as 
we call him, is associated with the Greenfield Bank. 
George H., born in i860; married to Mabel Bottsford ; 
resides in Greenfield ; is also in the bank. William S., 
born in 1862 ; married Minnie Black ; reside in Green- 
field. 

Mrs. Dr. Cooper, an accomplished lady, has resided 
in the city of Greenfield since 1858. Her mother's name 
was Hopper before marriage with George W. Hoel. Mr. 
and Mrs. Hoel are buried at Mechanicsburg cemetery, 
Henry county, Indiana. Both belonged to the Christian 
Church. Mr. H. served as Justice of the Peace for Adams 
township, also was County Commissioner for Madison 
county for two terms. The following are the names of 
Mrs. Cooper's brothers and sisters: Martin B., Jackson, 
Mrs. William Prigg, Mrs. Samuel Butkin, George W., 
Gary and Mrs. Isaac Cooper. Mrs. Prigg died in 1890, 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 373 

also Jackson and Gary ; all are deceased, and buried at 
Mechanicsburg cemetery. 

THE MINGLE FAMILY. 

The Mingle family since 1840 have been one of the 
prominent ones in both Hancock and Madison counties. 
George Mingle settled on the line dividing the counties in 
1840, but in Hancock county. He was born in Pennsyl- 
vania at the close of the last century, or about the year 
1795. His wife, Christena Loy, was born in Ohio two or 
three years later. They resided on the old farm until 
1868, when Mr. M. died. She died in 1872 ; both buried 
at the Mingle cemetery. Mr. and Mrs. Mingle were 
strong, vigorous pioneers, just in their prime when they 
came to this county. 

The following are their children's names : George, 
married to Eliza Mingle ; reside in Pendleton. Malissa, 
married to John Crist. She died in 1891 ; buried at the 
Menden cemetery. John, married to Miss Roberts. He 
died in 1870; is buried at Menden cemetery. Henry, 
married to Nancy Helm ; live in Pendleton, Indiana. 
Peter, born in Ohio in 1836; married to Sarah Barnard, 
who was born in 1838 ; live near Pendleton. Adam, mar- 
ried to Miss Umbenhour ; reside near Eden, Indiana. 
Martha A., married to Esterly Helm. He died in 1880; 
buried at Menden cemetery. Nancy, married to Moses 
C. Cook. He died in 1880 ; is buried at Menden ceme- 
tery, l^achel, married to Conrad Kinneman ; reside in 
Green township, Madison county, Indiana. 

A large, fine looking family as you will find in years 
of travel. Democratic to the core. Glad to give this 
family a sketch. Most of the children were born before 
they came to the count}- , except the two or three youngest. 
The older ones were born in Ohio prior to 1840. George 
Mingle, Sr., was a brother of Jacob Mingle, who came to 
Pendleton in an early day. 



374 '^"^ PIONEERS OF 

MINTS BROTHERS. 

Who in all the county has not heard of the ahove firm. 
Certainly but few, especially those who have been engaged 
in hog breeding, as this has been for years a specialty 
with them. The firm has been very successful as to rear- 
ing a good breed of hogs, also they have made a financial 
success of the venture. They resided in Buck-Creek 
township, where they owned a farm, under a fine state of 
cultivation. No men understood their business better than 
they, hence success attended them. The firm, so familiar, 
was broken by the death of Thomas H., who died in 
1895, just in the prime of life and the promise of future 
usefulness. Following will be found an obituary, pub- 
lished at the time, w^hich fitly tells of him better than I can 
write. Scott, the surviving brother, has the sympathy' of 
all the people in so severe a stroke the firm has received : 

Thomas H. Mints, son of William H. and Elizabeth Mints, 
was born February 16, 1S51, and died December i, 1895, after 
a lingering illness of six weeks, aged forty-four years, nine 
months and fifteen days. The funeral sermon was preached 
by Elder Thompson, of the Baptist Church, in a very imjDress- 
ive manner at Sugar-Creek Church on Tuesday, December 3, 
at 11:30 a. m., after which all that was mortal of a beloved and 
once loving brother were laid to rest in the cemetery adjacent 
to the church. 

The deceased was born and raised on the home farm, in 
which he always took a deep interest. He received a common 
school education and spent one term at the State Normal 
School to better prepare himself for teaching, which vocation 
he had decided upon. He began teaching in the fall of 1871 
and taught eight consecutive terms. He rapidly arose in his 
profession until he became one of the foremost teachers in the 
county. In 1879 he, in connection with his elder brother, 
formed a partnership for the rearing of improved swine, under 
the firm name of Mints Brothers, w^hich partnership continued 
uninterrupted until broken by death. The deceased was held 
in high esteem by his co-laborers in the same field, having been 




AQl^ILLA GRIST, President. 
County Commissioner, Western District. 




WILLIAM M. THOMAS, 
Commissioner, Eastern District. 



BENJAMIN F. WILSON, 
Commissioner, Middle District. 



376 THE PIONEERS OF 

President of the State Swine Breeders' Association, and hav- 
ing held many other minor places of Importance therewith. 
He also had the confidence of the people of his own neigh- 
borhood and that of his county. He had just entered on his 
second term as President of the Hancock County Mutual 
Insurance Association at the time of his death. Being honest 
and upright in all his dealings the community loses a valued 
member; the county a true and trusted citizen; the family an 
inseparable loss. He lived a life that needs no apologies. 

DR. S. B. McCRILLUS. 

Dr. McCrillus, the medicine man, was born in Dubois 
county, Indiana, June 27, 1830, son of Dr. A. B. and 
Sarah (Brown) McCrillus. Dr. McCrillus was almost 
born in a laboratory, and his best days have been spent in 
compounding and making medicines, whicli have gained 
a national reputation, and deservedly so, for there is none 
better than his for the ills of humanity, and the Doctor has 
successfully came to the rescue. He was married to Mary 
H. Comingore in i860. She was born in Paoli, Indiana, 
in 1840, and came to Anderson in 1861, since which time 
the family have resided there. Two children have been 
born to them, Annie S. and Etta L. Both reside in Los 
Angeles, California. 

Dr. S. B. McCrillus was elected Auditor of Dubois 
county, Indiana, in 1850, before he was twenty-one years 
of age. He is a free thinker, well posted on all subjects, 
was reared a Qiiaker and a gentleman, as well as a fine 
companion. His father died in 1850, his mother in 183 1 ; 
both buried in Dubois county. Following will be found a 
few lines written b}' the Doctor, introducing himself and 
medicine to the public. See his advertisement on the last 
page of the Pioneer : 

" I have been engaged in the medicine business ever since 
I can recollect. I made pills by the day when only a boy of 
ten years. For the past thirty-eight years I have been engaged 
in putting up what is known as Dr. McCrillus' popular stand- 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 377 

arc! remedies, European Balsam, Tonic Bl<jod Purifier, Oriental 
Liniment and Hoarhound Expectorant. Sold by druggists. I 
could offer thousands of genuine certificates, hut I am willing 
to leave the great public to judge of their merits. I have 
adopted for my special use a trade mark, whereby the public 
may be protecte<i against fraud and imposition. Relief has 
been obtained by thousands of suffers by the use of my medi- 
cines, and they in return have recommended them to others. 
In this way I am making living advertisements for myself and 
medicines. Be sure the name of Dr. S. B. McCrillus, Ander- 
son, Indiana, is on every bottle, otherwise it is a fraud. 

"DR. S. B. McCRILLUS, 

" Anderson, Indiana." 

AL. BRANDENBURG. 

Al., as we call him, was born in Henry county, Indi- 
ana, about the year 1856, son of Thomas Brandenburg, 
of Wilkinson, Indiana. Al. was married to Elizabeth 
McCuIlough about the year 1876. She is a daughter of 
the late George and Elizabeth (Boram) McCuIlough. She 
was born near Markleville, Indiana, about the year 1858. 
Her father died November 12, 1862. Her mother in 1892 ; 
both buried at the Collier cemetery. He was in the late 
war in Company K, Eighth Indiana Volunteers. One 
child, Delia, was born to Mr. and Mrs. Brandenburg 
about the year 1876. 

Mr. Brandenburg is a fine horticulturist and fruit 
grower and has several acres in a fine state of cultivation 
one-half mile south of Markleville, Indiana, where he 
enjoys life as well as the best of them. He is a free 
thinker and reader. Call and see them as you pass by. 

DR. CHARLES C. PRATT. 

Dr. Pratt was born in New Columbus, Madison 
county, Indiana, in 1857, son of Dr. Joel Pratt, who was 
born in Boston in 1826, and who practiced medicine in 
Madison county man}^ years. He died in 1872 ; is buried 



378 THE PIONEERS OF 

at Pendleton with his wife, formerly Miss Patrick, who 
died in 1858. She was born in Pendleton and was a 
daughter of Palmer Patrick, an early merchant there. 
Dr. C. C. Pratt read medicine first with his father, then 
with Dr. S. A. Troy, and graduated in the best medical 
school in the country. He then located at Milner Cor- 
ner, where he practiced several years, and then at Willow 
Branch, where he is to-day located (1895) and where he 
enjoys a good practice. He was first married to Mellie 
Jackson, a daughter of John Jackson, residing on the line 
dividing Madison and Hancock counties. She died in 
September, 1893, in early womanhood, loved and highly 
respected by all. Her death cast a gloom over that local- 
ity seldom if ever known there. Dr. Pratt in 1895 was 
married to EInora Fort, daughter of Moses Fort, a promi- 
nent gentleman of Brown township, now of Greenfield, 
Indiana, (1895). Mrs. Fort's mother's name before mar- 
riage was Thomas, daughter of John Thomas, a pioneer 
of near Willow Branch. 

Dr. Pratt is a Mason and loves the Order, and belongs 
to Warrington Lodge and higher degrees at Knightstown, 
Indiana. Socially, Dr. Pratt and wife stand high, and 
they count their friends by the score. Call and see them 
when at the Branch. 

E. M. RIGGS. 

Mr. Riggs was born in Virginia about the middle of 
the nineteenth century, a good time to make an advent 
here. About the 3'ear i860 he located in Madison county, 
at Lin wood, where he now (1895) resides. He is and has 
been most, if not all the time, engaged in the saw mill 
business, and he has made more lumber than any man that 
ever lived in the county, and this is saying a good deal for 
him. If you ever pass through Linwood, on the Michigan 
division of the Big Four, and see a mountain of saw-dust, 
3'ou will see where his mill is located, besieged with logs. 




LAWRENCE BORING, 
County Auditor. 





JAMES THOMAS, 
Recorder, 



WILLIAM H. PAULEY, 
Sheriff. 



380 THE PIONEERS OF 

log wagons, etc. Mr. R. has all those years been active 
and pushed his business from first to last, and the result is 
he has succeeded. He is a Democrat and quite well 
known all over the county as a tiptop gentleman. He is a 
brother of Dr. C. E. Riggs, who died atLinvvood in 1894. 

JOHN VARNER. 

Comrade Varner was born in Hancock count}- , Indi- 
ana, just in time to make a capital good soldier in the war 
of 1 86 1 -5, or about the year 1842. He enlisted in Sep- 
tember, 1861, in Company D, Thirty-fourth Indiana 
Volunteers, served three years and was in several hard- 
fought battles. After his return he was married to Malintha 
McDaniel, daughter of Levi McDaniel. She was born 
near Markleville, Indiana, in 1847. Her mother's name 
^before marriage was Elizabeth Shelton, daughter of 
Thomas Shelton, an early settler of Adams township. 
Her father, Levi McDaniel, died in Markleville, Indiana, 
March 15, 1895 ; is buried at the Walker cemetery. He 
was a Mason and a grand, good man, born in Ohio in 
1825. 

John Varner resides in Markleville, Indiana, is a free 
thinker and 3'Ou will find him a true friend to his com- 
rades. He was disabled in the arm}^ and draws a pension 
from the United States Government. Of fine physical 
form and florid complexion. When the lights are out for 
the last time he hopes to be at the general roll call. Call 
and see him at Markleville, Indiana. 

Following will be found an obituary of his mother, 
published at the time of her death : 

The death of a friend or dear one gives to life its darkest 
calamity. It is the voice of fate speaking to us in the dialect 
of mystery. We hear the sound, but cannot tell whence it 
conieth or whither it goeth. It was thus in the death of Mary 
A. Varner, of Jackson township, Hancock county, Indiana. 
She was born in Montgomery county, Pennsylvania, in 1818, 
aud departed this life Janmiry 15, 1896, aged seventy-eight 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 38 1 

years. She moved, with her parents, PhiHp and Catherine 
SHfer, from Pennsylvania to Six-Mile Creek, three miles north 
of Charlottesville, Hancock county, Indiana, in the year 1S33. 
She won the affections of one Samuel Varner, and they were 
united in the holy bonds of matrimon}' on the tith of July, 
1S39, and lived peacefully until his death, on December 5, 
1S91, at their old home. The fruits of this union were nine 
childi'en, three boys and six girls. There are left three girls 
and two boys to mourn the loss of a dear mother. She also 
leaves one sister, Margaret Heim, who is in her eighty-eighth 
year. 

Aunt Mary was the only one of the children born in this 
country, the I'est being born in Germany. She united with 
the Missionary Baptist Church in the year 1873 and remained 
a member until her death. 

Her funeral was conducted at her residence by Rev. C. 
Clark January 17, 1S96, after which her remains weie taken to 
the Simmons cemetery and there laid to rest. 

In the death of Mary A. Varner the family has lost one 
near and dear to them. 

We offer the following lines as a tribute of respect: 

O, mother! We sit within the room 

So strangely silent since thou art not there; 
The winter's sunshine silvers all the gloom, 

And falls across thine empty chair. 

O, patient hands, whose days of toil are o'er, 

So meekly folded on thy silent heart; 
How heavy was the cross of pain you bore — 

How sweet at last must seem the promised rest. 

Sad eyes that saw earth's splendor fade away 

And care and toil corrupt its fair delight; 
How bright the glow of heaven's unchanging day; 

The deathless life and garments white. C. H. 

R. D. HANNA, M. D. 

Dr. Hanna was born in Ohio in 1852. After receiv- 
ing a good education he studied medicine and graduated 
in 1876, and two years later came West and located at 
Warrington, Indiana, with but little means at his com- 



382 THE PIONEERS OF 

mand. He carae, however, to stay, and with plenty of 
vim and a splendid constitution he entered the iield, and it 
was not long until he had a fine practice, which he has 
steadily held until now. He at once became identified 
with the best interests of the county and, being public- 
spirited, his efl:brts were given to the development of the 
resources of Hancock county. On the discovery of gas 
in 1886 he soon engaged in having gas wells put down all 
over the county in connection with M. D. Masters. They 
have perhaps put down more wells than anv firm in the 
county. About the year 1884 he became owner of the 
Warrington flouring mills, and from a low run condition 
then he has succeeded in making it one of the best mills to 
be found in all the county. No mills have a better reputa- 
tion than his. About the 3'ear 1882 he was married to 
Alice McCray, an accomplished lady, who was born near 
Warrington about the year 1854. 

Dr. Hanna is a Mason of high standing and delights 
in its man}^ noble teachings. He joined at Warrington, 
Indiana, soon atler locating there. Socially, Dr. and 
Mrs. Hanna are recognized leaders, and their home is 
open at all times to receive iheir friends. In 1895 he was 
appointed United States Pension Examiner for Hancock 
county, Indiana. He is a Democrat, but not a member of 
any church. A man of fine presence, who will be recog- 
nized at once as a tiptop man and doctor. He is now 
(1895) associated with Dr. Charles Titus in the practice of 
medicine, whose preceptor he was, as well as several other 
deserving young M. D.'s. 

CHARLES TITUS, M. D., 

One of the rising men and doctors of the county, I 
wish to remember in the Pioneer. He was born near 
Markleville, Indiana, about the year 1870, son of the late 
Samuel Titus, an early settler there. His mother's name 
before marriage was Eliza Seward. She was born near 




■^ 




<^kyzy-i...cy^.^ O. 





384 THE PIONEERS OF 

Cincinnati, Ohio, daughter of the late James Seward. 
Mr. Titus was born in New Jersey in 1814. They were 
married in 1843. She died in 1872 ; he in 1867 ; both bur- 
ied at the Collier cemetery, where a fine monument marks 
their resting place. Dr. Charles Titus is the young- 
est of a large and interesting family of twelve children, 
among whom are Jane Little, Mrs. B. F. Ham, Riley, 
John, Mrs. George W. Ham, Ann, Clara and Lizzie, and 
one or two others whose names I do not know. 

Dr. Titus first commenced reading medicine with Dr. 
R. D. H^mna, of Warrington, Indiana, about the year 
1890, and graduated at one of the best medical schools of 
the State of New York in 1893 or 1894, when he perma- 
nently located at Warrington, and is associated at this 
time (1896) in the general practice with his preceptor, Dr. 
R. D. Hanna. Certainly no young man has started out 
under more favorable circumstances than Dr. Titus. His 
many friends predict for him a bright future. 

REV. MILES WALKER. 

Mr. Walker was born in North Carolina about the 
year 1810, and came to Hancock county in 1831. He 
joined the M. E. Church when a young man, and early 
developed into a teacher of more than local note. A fine 
speaker, and, for his advantages, was unequaledin his day. 
He only had a limited education, but was a student of the 
Bible to the exclusion of other books. He could draw 
large crowds of people wherever he went. He was of 
stout build, and a hard worker in his best days. He died 
in 1890, and is buried at the Menden cemetery, in Madi- 
son county. He was twice married. 

The following are the names of his children : Mar- 
cellus, resides in Hamilton county, Indiana ; Sarah L., 
Fremont, Jesse, Robert, Arpatia, married to Andrew J. 
Taylor, a blacksmith near Eden, and Mrs. Benjamin 
Clark. Fremont is deceased. 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 385 

Mr. Miles Walker was for a short time actin*^ Justice 

of the Peace for Green township. A grand, good man 

and pioneer, who will be remembered for many years to 

come. 

THE SEWARD FAMILY. 

This family was originally from England, but for the 
past seventy-five years has resided, or settled, near Cincin- 
nati, Ohio. I will only write of Oba, James, Daniel and 
Martin, all of whom at one time resided in Hancock and 
Madison counties at^ter 1848. Previous to that time they 
resided in Rush county, Indiana, coming there from Cin- 
cinnati perhaps in 1825. The family is a peculiar one, 
all lovers of horse flesh or fast horses, and perhaps there 
is no famil}' that is better judges than the Seward family, 
extending down to the last generation, or as soon as they 
can ride a colt. 

Oba Seward was born about the ^^ear 1790, and was 
married to Mary Sparks in Rush county, two grand old 
citizens and members of the Christian Church. He died 
in 1863; she a few years later. Their children's names: 
Joseph I., Samuel, Francis L., Mrs. Dr. Gregg, Mrs. John 
Vandyke, Mrs. Daniel Franklin, Mrs. John Huston and 
William, all dead except the first and last. Mrs. Gregg 
died in Texas. Mrs. Franklin is buried at Mechanicsburg, 
Indiana ; Mrs. Huston died in Markleville, Indiana ; Sam- 
uel died in Markleville ; F. L. is buried at Harlan cemetery, 
as is Mrs. John Vandyke. I think all the children v\^ere 
born in Rush county, Indiana. 

James Seward was married about the year 1825. His 
wife died many years ago. He died about the year 1870, 
and is buried at the Collier cemetery. His children's 
names are: Eliza, married to Samuel Titus. She died 
in 1873, and is buried at the Collier cemetery. Elias H., 
born in 1828 ; married to Kate McClellen. He died at 
Anderson in 1894, and is buried there. Another daughter 
married John L. Stoughton in 1840. She died about the 
23 



386 THE PIONEERS OF 

year 1849. Sarah, married to Andrew Vandyke. Both 
dead, and buried at the Collier cemetery. He died in 
1867 ; she in 1878. 

Daniel Seward married Miss Sloan, eldest daughter of 
William Sloan. The}^ moved to Illinois in 1850. Both 
are dead. 

Martin Seward resided for many years in Illinois, and 
died there perhaps in 1893. His wife and children I do 
not know much about. 

I am glad to notice this worthy family, one of great 
influence and high standing. Most of the family were and 
are members of the Christian Church, and Democrats to 
the core. Mrs. Joseph I. Seward, formerly Charlotte 
Hopper, died in Iowa about the year 1885. William Sew- 
ard married Mary A. Justice, and resides in Markleville, 
Indiana. Samuel Seward married Elizabeth Loveless. 
Both are dead. He died in 1866, and she fifteen years later. 
Francis L. married Miss Vandyke. He died in 1874, ^^^^ 
she fifteen years later. Both are buried at the Harlan 
cemeter}^. 

J. PARKS McCORD. 

For the past twenty-five years Mr. McCord has been 
one of the active business men of McCordsville, where he 
was raised, and has served in many places of trust, being 
elected Trustee for Vernon township as a Republican. 
About the year 1874 ^^^ ^^^ married to Rachel Riggs, who 
was born near Mechanicsburg, Henry county, Indiana, 
daughter of Alfred and Mary (Carter) Riggs. One child 
was born to them — William. He married Miss Alfrey. 
He died in 1894, aged about twenty-two years. 

Mr. and Mrs. McCord are deserving of many good 
friends, which they have". They stand high socially, and 
their elegant home in McCordsville is alwa3^s open to 
receive them. Glad to remember them in my book, and 
to wish them unmolested joy for years to come. Call and 
see them when in McCordsville. Mr. McC. is in the grain 



388 THE PIONEERS OF 

business there. Mr. and Mrs. McCord are now (1895) 
just in middle life, being about forty-five years of age. 
Mr. McCord is a son of William F. McCord. 

J. CROUCH KENNEDY. 

Mr. K., one of the progressive farmers of Brown 
tow^nship, was raised near Nashville, his parents being 
early settlers there. Crouch, as we call him, received a 
good business education that fitted him for any ordinary 
business. He has served several years as Trustee for 
Brown township, and always to the entire satisfaction of 
all. He was elected as a Democrat, as he is one of the 
old-timers. He owns a fine farm south of Nashville, near 
where his father located in an early day, perhaps in 1836. 
Mr. K. is just in the prime of life, about fifty years of age. 
Looking both ways from the hill-top of life, what a grand 
time and place to look from, when the follies of life are 
over and the thoughtful times at hand. Yes, Mr. K., was 
born at a grand time. Should he live to be one hundred 
years old, no man could have lived at a more interesting 
period. Glad to give Mr. K. a sketch in the Pioneer. Mrs. 
K. is a daughter of Elijah and Jane Reeves. 

WASHINGTON SPARKS. 

Wash, as we call him, spent his boyhood days in the 
vicinity of Warrington, and learned to play the fiddle 
there, and has perhaps " called " at more dances than any 
other man up and down Sugar Creek. About the 3^ear 
i860 he was married to Saluda Shelton, daughter of 
Thomas Shelton, and sister of Mrs. Jonathan Coon, Mrs. 
Levi McDaniel, Mrs. John King and John and Morris 
Shelton. Wash is a brother of Lysander Sparks, who 
served as Auditor of Hancock county eight years ; resides 
in Missouri. To know Wash is to know a tiptop, clever 
man, a good farmer and a gentleman in his every-day 
clothes, He resides near Markleville. Indiana, where he 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 389 

owns a desirable piece of land, whith he delights to culti- 
vate. Mr. and Mrs. Sparks delight to have their friends 
call on them. One of their daughters married Abram 
Blake, and resides in Anderson. 

GEORGE SCOTT. 

My old-time friend Scott was born in North Carolina, 
that is the Carolina of Madison county, near New Colum- 
bus, about the year 1850, son of Hayward Scott, who came 
early to the Carolina settlement. He died about the year 
1870. George Scott was married to Alice Cook, daughter 
of John and Nancy Cook, of Huntsville, Indiana. She 
was born in 1852 and died in 1892. A grand woman that 
I have known since she was a little girl of four years of 
age. Children's names : Fanny, Laura, Charles, Cora, 
Albert and two or three others whose names I have not got. 
Two died in infancy. Mrs. Scott is buried at Huntsville, 
Indiana. Mr. Scott was the second time married to Mrs. 
Kember in 1894, George is a Democrat and good farmer. 
He resides in Huntsville. He is a nephew of Duke Scott, 
Elsbury Scott and Mrs. Smith Davis, the two former dead 
and the latter resides in Anderson. 

JOHN W. WALES, 

Son of Samuel M. Wales, was born in Jackson town- 
ship about the middle of the nineteenth century, and is 
to-day (^1895) about forty-five years of age, or just on the 
hill-top of life. Born in a splendid time and place, in a 
grand country, grand State, splendid county, and a town- 
ship that is not surpassed in an}^ county. He was married 
to Mary F. Addison, daughter of Hon. John Addison. 
Mr. and Mrs. Wales belong to the Christian Church, and 
are among the best citizens of Jackson. Mr. Wales is a 
free thinker, of good mind, and a public speaker of no 
ordinary ability. He is a Populist, and an able advocate 
of that doctrine. He was nominated on that ticket in 1894 



390 



THE PIONEERS OF 



for Representative of the county, and received a very 
flattering vote. Glad to give him and family a sketch in 
my book. His father, Samuel Wales, was one of the 
pioneers of Hancock county, settling in Jackson back in 
the thirties. His wife, formerly Christina Simmons, was a 
lady of many fine qualities, daughter of the late John B. 
Simmons of Jackson township, afterwards a banker in 
Greenfield. Mrs. John B. Simmons died in 1895. Both 
buried at the Simmons cemetery, as well as the parents of 
J. W. Wales. 

The Samuel Wales family was a large one. All dead 
except Henry, John W. and Mrs. Fields. Samuel M. 
Wales died Januar}^ i, 1888 ; Mrs. Wales, July, 1870. 

Following will be found an obituary, published at the 
time of the death of Mr, Wales : 

Samuel M. Wales died at his home in Jackson township, 
Sunday, January i, 188S, aged sixty-three years, ten months and 
fifteen days. He took sick on Monday, December, 26, 1S87, 
with typhoid pneumonia, and rapidly sank until Sunday, Janu- 
ary I, 188S, when he died. He was born in North Carolina in 
1834, and came to this county in 1839. He has been a faithful 
member of the Christian Church for thirty-eight years. He 
lived a christian life until his death. He was an honest, upright 
man in all his dealings, and was respected l:)y all who knew 
him. He leaves a wife and three children to mourn his loss as 
a kind husband and affectionate father. The good ship on 
which he sailed was anchored at last, and he is now safely in 
the port. His funeral, at the Nameless Creek Church, was 
conducted by Rev. Blackman. His remains were then moved 
to their last resting place in the Simmons graveyard, followed 
by one of the largest crowds that ever moved lo this cemetery. 
The crowd that followed showed their respect. Children, no 
longer mourn, your father is with his God. 

RILEY McKOWN. 

JUDGE CHARLES G. OFFUTT. 

One of the prominent men of Hancock count}' whom 
I wish to remember is the one whose name heads this 



39^ 



THE PIONEERS OF 



sketch. He was born in Kentucky October 4, 1845, son 
of Lloyd and Elizabeth Otiutt ; the former of Maryland 
and the latter of Kentucky. He, early in life, received a 
good education in his adopted State, where his parents 
moved in an early day. At the age of seventeen years 
he entered the store of Samuel Heavenridge, of Green- 
field, Indiana, as a clerk. After this he taught school for 
a term of years preparatory to reading law. His first 
preceptor in the law was the late James L. Mason, of 
Greenfield. He was a hard student and in due time was 
admitted to the bar in 1870. He has been associated in 
the practice with Judge Buckles, of Muncie, Indiana, and 
Judge Martin, of Greenfield, Indiana, and as might be ex- 
pected has been very successful at the bar of Greenfield 
and other bars of Central Indiana. In 1872 he represented 
the county in the State Legislature, where he served cred- 
itably to all concerned. In 1876 he was elected Democratic 
Elector for the Sixth Congressional District of Indiana. 
In 1894 he was elected Judge of the Circuit Court of Han- 
cock county for six years, and where he is to-day (1896) 
serving with distinction. Mr. Oftutt was married to Annie 
Hammel July 15, 1874. Two children have been born to 
them. 

Glad to give Judge Oftutt a notice in my work. One 
so deserving and worthy of this, poor as it is. His father 
died in Greenfield a few years ago. His mother resides in 
Greenfield. Judge Oftutt is a member of the I. O. O. F. 

lodge. 

FRANCIS M. SANFORD. 

Mr. Sanford is a son of Moses G. Sanford, who was 
born in Virginia about the year 1800. F. M. Sanford was 
born in Greenfield, Indiana, August 7, 1836; married to 
Miss Adams March 19, 1859, ''^"^ ^^^^ parents of nine 
children, six living and three dead. In August, 1862, he 
enlisted in Company B, Eighth Indiana Volunteers, and 
served until the close of the war. He was in the battles of 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES, 393 

Grand Bluff, Magnolia Springs, Winchester, Black River, 
Fisher's Hill, Cedar Creek, Champion Hills and Espranzia. 
He was wounded in battle, and had his feet frozen by 
exposure. Mr. Sanford's military record is long and good. 
He owns a fine farm in the south-east part of Buck-Creek 
township, where he enjoys life and where has lived many 
years. He has served as Constable and Justice of the 
Peace to the entire satisfaction of the people there. He 
was poor when married, only having fifteen dollars, and 
they eat their first meal from the top of a trunk, without 
chairs. Mr. S. is a member of the U. B. Church, and he 
and his wife stand foremost in society. He worked for 
twenty-five cents a day to get a start in the world, and has 
succeeded be3"ond expectation. 

I am glad to write of one who in his best days went to 
the front to defend the honor of the old flag, and one who 
has had the courage and pluck to face poverty and battle 
with the early hardships of a new county. Long life and 
plenty to this famil}^ is nothing more than they richly 
deserve. 

JOSEPHUS BILLS. 

One of the live men for years at Fortville, Indiana, is 
the one whose name heads this sketch. I do not know 
the exact time Mr. B. was born, but back in the thirties, 
perhaps 1835, ^ little past the middle or hill-top of life 
to-day (18^5). For years he was one of the principal 
merchants and business men of Fortville. In all its 
enterprises no man has contributed more than Mr. Bills. 
During his more active life he was associated with his 
brother William in the general trade, but the past few 
years has retired from active business. He is an Odd 
Fellow, and I think a charter member of Fortville lodge. 
He was married about the year 1858 to Elizabeth Camp, 
of near Woodbury, Hancock county, Indiana. 

No man in Hancock county is better known than Mr. 
Bills, either in social or business life. In his make-up he 



394 THE PIONEERS OF 

is jovial, draws friends and holds them. He has always 
been liberal and kind to the poor. I am glad to say as 
much for Mr. Bills. Long after he has been gathered to 
his fathers he will be remembered as one of Fortville's 
best citizens. 

JOSHUA SHELBY, 

One of the grand old pioneers, was born in Indiana in 
1815, son of Joshua Shelby. The family came to Buck- 
Creek township, Hancock county, Indiana, in 1834. "^^^^ 
elder Joshua died in 1839. Joshua, Jr., was married to 
Nancy Dunn in 1839. ^^"^^ ^^ a daughter of Abner Dunn, 
an early citizen of the same locality. 

Joshua Shelby, whose name heads this sketch, was 
elected Sheriff of Hancock county in 1852 as a Democrat, 
but only served a few months. He served as Justice and 
Trustee for Buck Creek for several years. He was an 
honest man, and well calculated for a pioneer life, caring 
little for the superfluities of to-day. 

The following are the names af his children : Cath- 
arine E., Samuel N., Sarah, Lydia, Elvira and John F. 
I am glad to give this family a sketch in the Pioneer. Mr. 
Shelby died, I think, in 1884. 



HISTORY OF HANCOCK LODGE, NO. loi, F. 
AND A. M. 

Most Worshipful Gravid Master and Brethren: 

To me has been assigned the pleasant duty on this occas- 
ion to write the history of Hancock Lodge, No. loi, F. & A. 
M., and I approach the duties with much trepidation, as I feel 
assured that this task could have been better performed by 
others. 

The history of the lodge is written in the record of its 
deeds, not its membership, and whatever this lodge has done 
for good is a part of the history of this beautiful city. The 
moral standing of a city is measured by the character and 



396 THE PIONEERS OF 

standing of its churches, schools and societies. We take great 
pleasure in claiming that this lodge has done its part in the 
material progress of this city and community; that it has kept 
step to the music of Faith, Hope and Charity. It has adminis- 
tered to the sick, aided the widows of deceased brethren, and 
has assisted in educating their orphans, and whatever it has 
done in the way of charity, which is a cardinal virtue of our 
beloved order, it has been done in true Masonic spirit. 

The teachings of Masonry make good citizens, and we 
take pride in mentioning the men who have been connected 
with this lodge, as we believe that its members stand among 
the foremost men in this community, that it represents and has 
represented among its membership men in every vocation in 
life, and to say in Greenfield that a man is a Mason means 
much. It means that he is a good citizen, true to his family, to 
his country, and true to what is right. 

Hancock Lodge was instituted under dispensation Febru- 
ary 23, 1849, with James Rutherford, W. M.; Harry Pierson, 
S. W.; James Bracken, F. W., and the following Master 
Masons: Colonel George Tague, Orlando Grain, Morris Pier- 
son, James Shipman and Nathan D. Cofiin. 

The Worshipful Master appointed Orlando Grain, Secre- 
tary ; George Tague, Treasurer; James Shipman, S. D.; Na- 
than Cofiin, J. D.; Morris Pierson, Tyler. 

They met in the Old Seminary, which was for a long time 
the family residence of Captain Riley. The room in which 
they met was occupied at the same time by the Sons of Tem- 
perance. The lodge continued to occupy the Old Seminary 
for a lodge room until they moved into the Masonic Hall in 
1855. 

The lodge worked under dispensation until June 20, 1850. 
The following persons were raised to the Sublime Degree of a 
Master Mason while working under dispensation, and in the 
order named, to-wit: 

Robert E. Barnett, Jonathan Rawls, John Templin, John Shipman, 
E. B. Chittenden, J. K. Nixon, Adams L. Ogg, Cornwell Meed, John 
Milroy (on demit), B. T. Butler, George Henry and P. H. Foy, who 
passed to the degree of Fellowcraft, consequently, all the others, except 
Foy, were charter members of the lodge. 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 397 

The officers under the charter, and installed as such June 
30, 1S50, were as follows: 

James Rutherford, W. M. 
James Bracken, J. W. 

Morris Pierson, Treasurer. 

Robert E. Barnett, S. W. 
Jonathan Rawls, J. D, 

E. B. Chittenden, Tyler. 

The first Masonic raising under the charter was P. H. 
Foy. Of the little band that assembled under dispensation in 
the Old Seminary, but one is now living — Nathan D. Coffin. 
Of the charter members, but three are now living, and only 
two of these are affiliated Masons, to-wit : John Shipman and 
Nathan D. Coffin. 

There have been initiated into this lodge two hundred and 
ninety, received on demit one hundred and thirty-five, making 
in all four hundred and twenty-five. There were two years 
during the history of the lodge in which there were no addi- 
tions ; one hundred and thirty members have demitted, and 
the lodge now has a membership of one hundred and forty- 
two. 

The last sad rites of Masonry have been administered over 
the remains of the following brethren : 

Orlando Grain, August 17, 1852. 
Joseph Bridges (a non-affiliated), October i, 1854. 
Samuel Longnecker, February 28, 1S55. 
George Grain, April 3, 1855. 
John Milroy, October 15, 1858. 
John D. Welling, April 14, 1S59. 

B. G Jay, June 17, i860, (Brother Jay was Secretary of the lodge 
at the time of his death). 

Hugh Williamson, January 2, 1864. 
Benjamin H. Duncan, March 7, 1864. 
Samuel H. Dunbar, November 19, 1S64. 
Milton VanLaningham, March 28, 1867. 
Isaac Willett, April i, 1867. 
Isaac N. Beeson, Fe_bruary 10, 1869. 
George' Y. Adkinson, July 25, 1S69. 
Nathan Grawford, November i, 1869. 
James W. Leary, April 12, 1S70. 
Thomas Snow, May 18, 1870. 
George Tague, December 10, 1871. 



398 THE PIONEERS OF 

Philip Drischel, September i, 1S73. 

Milton D. Brown, March 25, 1874. 

Harry Pierson, September 10, 1S74. 

Dr. Lot Edwards, September 13, 1874. 

James Judkins, December 26, 1S74. 

Cornwell Meek, July 26, 1S75. 

Henry A. Swope, June iS, 1S77. 

Harrison Barr, September 5, 1878. 

Hiram Wood, October 9, 187S. 

Benjamin F. Woodhall, January 5 , 1S79. 

Alfred D. Wills, January 7, 1879. 

William Parry Smith, March 27, 1879. 

Morris Pierson, May 23, 1879. 

Thomas M. Bidgood, July 22, 1879. 

Michael Whitley Ward, November 28, 18S0. 

Nathan Hendren, 18S0. 

Moses Turk, August 15, 1884. 

James K. King, October 22, 1884. 

J. B. Sparks, February 9, 1S86. 

Ephraim Thomas, August 4, 1SS6. 

R. P. Brown, April 5, 1S87. 

Andrew T. Hart, October 13, 1888. 

James V, Martin, October 28, 18S9. 

Elam I. Judkins, April 15, 1S90. 

William Hammel, July 2, 1S90. 

Joseph Baldwin, April 29, 1S91. 

William J. Sparks, June 21, iSgi. 

James W. Wilson, October 25, 1891. 

E.J. Baldwin, March i, 1893. 

William K. Jacobs, October 16, 1893. 

Reece Price, November 17, 1893. 

George Barnett, July 5, 1894. 

A. C, Handy, July 15, 1894. 

George G. Tague, February 24, 1895. 

We may not have given all the Masonic funerals, as the 
records of the lodge in this particular are very faulty. 

A number of Masons have died within the jurisdiction of 
this lodge, and members of the same, who were not given a 
Masonic funeral, as it is a fundamental principle of Masonry 
not to administer the funeral rites unless requested to do so. 
The following brethren have filled the office of Worshipful 
Master in the order given : 

James Rutherford, six years. 

Robert E. Barnett, ten years. 



400 



THE PIONEERS OF 



Elam I. Judkins, three years. 
Jonathan Tague, one year. 
L. W. Dooding, one year. 
Presley Guymon, two years. 
George W. Dove, seven years. 
Ephraim Marsh, five years. 
Samuel S. Boots, one year. 
Joseph Baldwin, one year. 
William G. Scott, two years. 
Walter O. Bragg, one year. 
William H. Glascock, one year. 
A. J Smith, one year. 
John Corcoran, one year. 
Charles Downing, two years. 

The following brethren have served as Senior Warden, 
namely : 



Harry Pierson, 
Nathan D. Coffin, 
Orlando Crain, 
Robert E. Barnett, 
Charles H. Burt, 
Elam I. Judkins, 
Benjamin E. Duncan, 
L. W. Gooding, 
George Tague, 
Presley Guymon, 
John W. Ryon, 

D. D. Vanwie, 

E. W. Patton, 
A. D. Wills, 



Joseph Baldwin, 
William M. Matthews, 
Winfield S. Fries, 
William G. Scott, 
Elbert S. Bragg, 
Henry Snow, 
Walter O. Bragg, 
O. S. Coffin, 
William Ward Cook, 
A. J. Smith, 
Charles Downing, 
John Corcoran, 
Charles Barr, 
Samuel P. Gordon. 



S. S. Boots, 

The following brothers have served as Junior Warden 



James R. Bracken, 
J. R. Nixon, 
Benjamin F. Duncan, 
B. G. Jay, 
Charles H. Burt, 
B, W. Cooper. 
John W. Ryon, 
E. W. Pierson, 
Jonathan Tague, 
James H. Carr, 
George Barnett, 
Presley Guymon, 



George W. Dove, 
Jacob A. Hall, 
Samuel Boots, 
Ephraim Marsh, 
William W. Matthews, 
Winfield S. Fries, 
Lee O. Harris, 
Elbert S. Bragg, 
Wallace Everson, 
Walter O. Bragg, 
O. S. Coffin, 
Charles Downing, 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 



401 



L. W. Gooding, 
A. D. Wills. 
Amos C. Beeson, 
Nelson Bradley, 



A. J. Smith, 
John Corcoran, 
Charles Barr, 
John T. Duncan. 



The foUowins: brothers have served as Treasurer 

Presley Guymon, 
Matthew L. Paullus, 
Samuel R. Banner, 
Nelson Bradley. 



Col. George Teague, 
Morris Pierson, 
Andrew T. Hart, 
John W. Ryon, 



Samuel Heavenridge, 

Brother Bradley has held the office of Treasurer continu- 
ously from 1870 to the present time. 

The following named brothers have served as Secretary : 

Orlando Crain, George Barnett, 

Robert E, Barnett, Samuel S. Boots, 

John Templin, Jonathan Tague, 

James H. Carr, 

Enos Gery, 

E. S. Duncan, 

James W. Wilson, 

R. A. Smith, 

John L. Fry, 

Daniel B. Cooper, 

W. O. Bragg. 



James R. Bracken, 

A. P. Williams, 

B. G. Jay, 
James L. Mason, 
M. C. Foley, 
E. I. Judkins, 
Thomas M. Bidgood, 
Amos C. Beeson, 



The follov^ino- brothers have served as Senior Deacon 



James Shipman, 
E. B. Chittenden, 
R. E. Barnett, 
A. K. Branham, 
Benjamin P. Duncan, 
Nathan D. Coffin. 
Jonathan Tague, 
A. M, Hodson, 
A B.Bundy, 
L. W. Gooding, 
Presley Guymon, 
Samuel Heavenridge, 
George W. Dove, 



R. A. Riley, 
Samuel W. Barnett, 
Thomas M. Bidgood, 
Ephraim Marsh, 
Joseph Baldwin, 
W. O. Bragg, 
O. S. Coffin, 
Charles Downing, 
A.J. Smith, 
E.J. Baldwin, 
Edward W. Felt, 
Quitman Jackson. 
Jesse D. Jackson. 



The following brothers have served as Junior Deacon 



Nathan D, Coffin, 
Jonathan Rawls, 
Charles H. Burt, 
James H. Carr, 
24 



Milton Brown, 
Hiram Chambers, 
Thomas C. Snider, 
William M. Pierson, 



402 



THE PIONEERS OF 



S. E. Duncan, 
M. F. Wills, 
Robert Hurley, 
William J. Sparks, 
Taylor Morford, 
Wood L. Walker, 
E. W. Felt, 
Stephen G. White, 
E. J. Baldwin, 
Charles Barr, 
George W. Duncan, 
John L. McNew, 
Elmer J. Binford. 



Jonathan Tague, 
John W. Ryon, 
E. W. Pierson, 
O. F. Meek, 
Samuel Heavenridge, 
William J. Foster, 
E. N. Wright, 
John McCrew, 
Calvin Bennett, 

D. D. Vanwie, 
John Kiefer, 
Amos C. Beeson, 
John O, G. Collins, 
L. A. Stephens, 

The following named members have served as Tyler : 

Morris Pierson, John C. Meek, 

E. B. Chittenden, Benjamin Price, 
John D. Welling, R. W. Rains, 
William J. Foster, Andrew J. Gephart, 
Samuel Heavenridge, James W. Wilson, 
John S. Hawkins, James K. King, 

M. W. Ward, Joseph Baldwin, 

Moses Turk, M. G. Alexander, 

M. A. Sleath, Enos Gery. 
Thomas C. Snider, 

The first Trustees of the lodge were Andrew T. Hart, 
Robert E. Barnett and James Rutherford, who continued to act 
as such, except Rutherford, who died in iS^6, who was suc- 
ceeded by William R. West, and those three acted until August 
i^, 1862, when the first legal election was held, which resulted 
in the election of Robert E. Barnett, George Tague and Nathan 
D. Coffin. 

We have not given a list of the Trustees for the reason 
that the record of the election of the Trustees of the lodge has 
been omitted for quite a while, and the by-laws of the lodge 
providing for Trustees was repealed some years ago, and the 
lodge at this time transacts its business through its Worshipful 
Master and Wardens. 

The corner-stone of the old Masonic Hall was laid with 
appropriate ceremonies August 15, 1S54, by Right Worshipful 
Elijah Newlan, Deputy Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of 
the State of Indiana. 




KASPER lihRK, 
Mohawk, Ind. 



404 THE PIONEERS OF 

The building committee of the old hall were James R. 
Bracken, Chairman ; Reuben A. Riley, Samuel Longnecker, 
Benjamin F. Duncan, Adren Rivett and Nathan D. Coffin. 

The building of the old hall taxed the Masons to their 
fullest financial capacity, and for a long time the fate of the 
enterprise hung in the balance, as is shown by the report of the 
building committee, which reads as follows : "The character 
and standing of the lodge is at stake on this enterprise. The 
community at large look with great interest on the success of 
this project, and, having advanced thus far, it would leave a 
very unfavorable impression, numbering, as we do within our 
ranks, so many of the ablest and best men of our county." 

Thanks to those noble and true Masons who by their 
money and labor built the old hall and laid the financial founda- 
tion of this lodge deep and broad, and to-day Hancock lodge is 
one of the wealthiest and most prosperous in the State. To 
our keeping has been transmitted this valuable heritage. Will 
we be recreant to our trust ? God forbid. 

We have with us to-day some of the pioneers, who made it 
possible for us to celebrate this day, and we would think that 
this paper would be incomplete without especially honoring 
them by mentioning their names. We refer to Capt. James H. 
Carr, John W. Ryon, Nathan D. Coffin, Arthur P. Williams 
and John Shipman of the living, and of the dead James Ruth- 
erford, Dr. Elam I. Judkins, Andrew T. Hart, Reuben A. 
Riley and R. E. Bennett. 

We see upon the roll of membership of Masons who 
assisted in the great work of building up and promoting the 
interest of the lodge, who have suff'ered themselves by their 
negligence to drop from the roll, after they had contributed so 
much by their labor and money to build up the lodge. 

The lodge held a grand festival July 5, 1855, in the public 
hall of the Masonic building, which is evidently the first meet- 
ing of any kind held in the old hall. Just when the old lodge 
hall and the one now occupied by the lodge was dedicated the 
minutes do not disclose, but it was sometime in the year 1855. 
November 26, 1857, Dr. Robert E, Barnett, on behalf of Mrs. 
James Rutherford, presented the lodge the Masonic regalia of 
James Rutherford, the first Worshipful Master of the lodge. 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 



405 



Brother Rutherford was a bright Mason, but, Hke many others, 
failed to obey the teachings which he so frequently taught, his 
life went out in darkness. He fell the victim of intemperance. 
May his weakness be a warning to all, and may we be true and 
faithful. Peace to his ashes. 

The following are the names of the present officers : 

Charles Downing, W. M. 
Samuel P. Gordon, S. W. 
John T. Duncan, J. W. 
Nelson Bradley, Treasurer. 
W. O. Bragg, Secretary. 
Jesse D. Jackson, S. D. 
Elmer E. Binford, J. D. 
Enos Gery, T_yler. 

We herewith give a roster of the members, namely : 



Milton G. Alexander, 
Samuel S. Boots, 
Walter O. Bragg, 
John A. Barr, 
S. A. D. Beckner, 
William C. Barnard, 
Joshua Barrett, 
Charles S. Brand, 
Lawrence Boring, 
James H. Carr, 
Hiram Chambers, 
John Corcoran, 
William H. Carr, 
Daniel B. Cooper, 
George H. Cooper, 
Charles Do-wning, 
George W. Duncan, 
William P. Denny, 
Wallace Everson, 
Oliver P. Eastes, 
James P. Eastes, 
Winfield S. Fries, 
John L. Fry, 
Marshall A. Fry, 
John H. Felt, 
Lemuel W. Gooding, 
Frederick E. Glidden, 
Samuel P. Gordon, 



Nelson Bradley, 
Elbert S. Bragg, 
Franklin Boots, 
Charles Barr, 
Robert B. Binford, 
Lee Barrett, 
Harvey D. Barrett, 
Elmer J. Binford, 
Nathan D. Coffin, 
John F. Coffin, 
Isaiah Curry, 
William Ward Cook, 
Francis M. Conklin, 
William S. Cooper, 
Samuel E. Duncan, 
John T. Duncan, 
William C. Dudding, 
O. M. Edwards, 
Vincent L. Early, 
James A. Eastes, 
Mansfield C. Foley, 
James A. Flippo, 
Thomas J. Faurot, 
Edvsrard W. Felt, 
Jacob Forrest, 
Enos Gery, 
William H. Glascock, 
George W. Gordon, 



4o6 



THE nONEERS OF 



Raymond E. Gery, 
Jacob A. Hall, 
Lee O. Harris, 
Frank S. Hammel, 
William R. Hough, 
Harry S. Hume, 
Columbus M.Jackson, 
Quitman Jackson, 
Warren R. King, 
William M. Lewis, 
William W. Matthews, 
Ephraim Marsh, 
Elliott Marlow, 
W, S. Montgomer}', 
Francis M. Moore, 
George W. Morehead, 
Walter W. McCole, 
Benjamin Price, 
William M. Pierson, 
John W. Ryon, 
"m. F. Rickoff, 
James F. Reed, 
Hudson M. Smith, 
William G. Smith, 
Isaac Bruce Smith, 
Henry Snow, 
William A. Scott, 
Elmer E. Stoner, 
Edward Slifer, 
William A. Service, 
Elbert Tyner. 
Edwin Pope Thayer, 
Allen D. Trucblood, 
D. N. Wright, 
Jackson Wills, 
Marshall F. Wills, 
Samuel A. Wray, 
J. Ward Walker, 
Arthur R. Walker, 
Edwin P. Wilson, 
John Q^ White, 
William P. Wilson. 
Robert C. Zike, 

Nearly fifty years 
Masons met in the Old 



Clifford R. Gery, 
Kasper Herr. 
Robert Hurley, 
Jeremiah Ilendren, 
William A. Hough, 
George W. Ham, 
Manford W. Jay, 
Jesse S. Jackson, 
Samuel M, Kraer. 
James N. Larrimore, 
Oscar F. Meek, 
Taylor Morford, 
John O. Moore, 
Jasper H. Moulden, 
Corydon W. Morrison, 
William H. Moore, 
Thomas J. Owens, 
William F. Pratt, 
Israel P. Poulson, 
Jesse Rhoadarmer, 
Abraham N. Rhue, 
Calvary G. Sample, 
A. V.B. Sample, 
Robert A. Smith, 
Andrew J. Smith, 
Edward P. Scott, 
William G. Scott, 
Samuel N. Shelby, 
Francis M. Sanford, 
Harry G. Strickland, 
John A. Turk, 
Andrew M. Tague, 
John S. Thomas, 
Noble Warum, 
Richard H. Warrum, 
Samuel W. Wiley, 
Wood L. Walker, 
William B. Walker, 
George S. Wilson, 
Stephen G. White, 
Samuel R. Wells, 
Charley M. Winn. 

have rolled by since that little band of 
Seminary, and proud they were when 




\ 




ts— tA_A-J^ 




408 THE PIONEERS OF 

they built the Masonic Hall. The building of the hall was a 
great undertaking for that day. How memories cluster around 
the hall. How dear and sacred it is to all ; but Masonr}', which 
ever keeps abreast of the time, was not contented with it. The 
city and lodge had outgrown it; it was not "up to date." 
Many were the spirited debates which took place as to what 
we should do or where we should go, and many preferred to 
build on the old site, especially among the older members, the 
outgrowth of which was the appointment of a committee, con- 
sisting of Charles Downing, W. M. ; Samuel P. Gordon, S. D. ; 
John T. Duncan, J. D. ; Brothers Nelson Bradley, Samuel R. 
Wells, Daniel B. Cooper and Ephraim Marsh, who were given 
full power to purchase ground and to locate the site for the 
new temple, and what was known as the Walker corner was 
finally agreed upon, but it took money to buy such valuable 
property, and subscription was immediately started, which was 
headed by Brother Nelson Bradley, with a cash subscription of 
$1,000, and the following brethren in the amounts respectively : 

Nelson Bradley $1 000 

S.R.Wells 300 

Ephraim Marsh 200 

Samuel P. Gordon . 200 

Daniel B. Cooper 100 

Charles Downing 100 

J. Ward Walker 100 

Charles Barr 100 

George S. Wilson 100 

William Ward Cook .. .-. 100 

Vinton L. Early 100 

Barr & Morford 100 

Winfield S. Fries 100 

Edwin P. Thayer 100 

Morgan Chandler 100 

Jasper H. Moulden 100 

Samuel S. Boots 100 

George H. Cooper 100 

Elmer E. Stoner 100 

William H. Glascock _ 100 

John T. Duncan 50 

George W. Morehead 50 

C. W. Morrison 50 

George W. Duncan 50 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 4O9 

William G.Scott 50 

Elbert Tjner - 5° 

William C, Barnard .__ _._ 50 

Lawrence Boring — — 50 

John L. McNew 25 

Walter O. Bragg 25 

M. CQ^iiglej . 25 

Harry S. Hume 25 

John Q^ White ._ - 25 

Harvey D. Barren -- 25 

W.S.Montgomery -^ 25 

Lee Barrett — -- - 25 

Harry Strickland .. .. 25 

(4j.ni man Jackson , — — 25 

A.J.Smith 25 

W.R.King 25 

I. P. Poulson . , 25 

Felt&Jackson --. -- 25 

A. V.B. Sample 25 

E. N. Wright 25 

Henry Snow — 25 

D. Beckner 25 

John Corcoran --- -- 25 

W. B. Walker 15 

S. A. Wray 15 

C. K. Bruner 15 

T. T. Barrett --- 10 

W. A. Wilkins -- 10 

W. S.Gant 10 

T. J. Faurot 10 

William Tollen & Co 10 

J.S.Jackson — ^o 

W. W. McCole 10 

S.W.Wiley --- 10 

W. N. Vaughn 10 

E.S.Bragg 10 

S.M.Shelby 5 

Enos Gery 5 

N. D. Coffin 5 

E.J.Binfbrd - 5 

F.J. Coffin - 5 

Charlie Winn --- - — 5 

And in two days nearly $5,000 was raised. 

We have met to-day to lay the corner-stone of this mag- 



4IO 



THE PIONEERS OF 



nificent and beautiful temple, to be erected and dedicated to the 
use of Masonry. 

The new temple will cost, when completed, in round num- 
bers, $35,000. This does not include the real estate, which is 
valued at $12,000, and we feel that we can truthfully say that it 
will be one of the finest, if not the finest. Masonic temple in 
the State. 

When completed we hope to take up the active work in 
the new temple where we left oft' in the old, and may we carry 
the work forward, that when the history of the lodge is written 
fifty years hence, may its pages be as bright as those that have 
gone before. May it have done as much for humanity as those 
that have gone by, and that we have this day not built for 
to-day, but for eternity. 

"Those spacious regions where our fancies roam, 

Pained bj the past, expecting ills to come, 

In some dread moment, by the fates assigned, 

Shall pass away, nor leave a rack behind ; 

And Time's revolving wheels shall lose at last 

The speed that spins the future and the past ; 

And, sovereign of an undisputed throne, 

Awful eternity shall rule alone." 

EPHRAIM MARSH. 



WILLIAM MITCHELL, SR. 

At the close of my work I feel more than ever how 
far short I will come of writing about persons as they de- 
serve, especially so now in writing of the one whose name 
heads this sketch, one who has been a leader in all the 
stirring events of Hancock county for the past forty years, 
all the time at the head of The Hancock Democrat, 
established by him in 1859. Under some disadvantages it 
has, step by step, risen, until to-day (1896) it is second to 
few if any papers in our grand State. All along those 
eventful years he has guided it aright, faithful at the helm 
during the dark days of 1861-65. But few men could 
have succeeded as Mr. Mitchell has. A steady, healthy 




OLIVER A. COLLINS, M. D. 
Mohawk, Indiana. 



412 THE PIONEERS OF 

growth has marked its career. From a four-page paper to 
an eight or quarto weekly has it made its appearance as a 
welcome visitor to thousands of homes throughout the 
country. To build up a paper of this kind, and to be its 
owner and editor, must certainly be a joy and gratification 
to its proprietor. A bold advocate of true Democracy all 
the time, no dodging or straddling. You always know 
where to find the Democrat on all important subjects. Mr. 
Mitchell is among the best informed men of the day, ex- 
tending back into the forties, when and since he has been 
personally acquainted with more public men than perhaps 
any journalist in the State. During the past forty years 
but two publications have been missed, and this was during 
the war, when the office was seized by the Government to 
do the work of printing the names of persons to be drafted. 

He was born in Montgomery county, Kentucky, 
August 6, 1830, son of John F. Mitchell, who was born in 
1 791 ; died in 1868 in Greenfield. Mrs. John F. Mitchell 
died in Kentucky in 1834. ^^^ name was Enfield Rails. 
She is buried at Maysville, Kentucky. William Mitchell 
learned the printer's trade at Maysville, Kentucky, back 
in the forties, with Colonel Dick Stanton, a bright editor 
and politician of that day. He was married in 1852 to 
Calasty Long, of Cincinnati, Ohio. Born there in 1833; 
died in Greenfield, Indiana, September 25, 1892. A 
grand, good woman, who for years was more than a help- 
mate in all the afl^airs of a married life. Her death cast a 
gloom over this interesting family that seldom happens. 
The entire city caught the gloom that has never quite 
cleared awa}-. About this time Mr. Mitchell had the mis- 
fortune of losing his sight, making the world doubly dark, 
that few men could have went through. 

The following are the names of Mr. and Mrs. Mitch- 
ell's children: John F., foreman of Democrat office; 
married to Minnie B. Alexander; Leah, Thomas H., 
Fannie, Samuel C, died in Cincinnati, Ohio, July 9, 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 413 

1892; buried at Greenfield, Indiana; Eliza O., William, 
Nellie, George, Mattie, twins, died in infancy. 

ROBERT Y. BARNARD. 

Among the early settlers of Green township was the 
one whose name heads this sketch. He came back in the 
thirties, settling north-east of Eden, where the family now 
(1896) live. Mr. B. was married in 1836 to Mary Hopper. 
They came poor but to stay, and the result is, after long 
years of toil, succeeded in gaining a competency to keep 
them and have plenty left for their surviving children. The 
county was new when Mr. and Mrs. Barnard came to their 
home. They did not get rich in a day, but by hard toil 
and frugality, which has marked their long career. Mr. 
B. was an old-line Whig up to 1856, then a Republican. 
He has always been a quiet, law-abiding citizen, making 
little useless noise, politically or otherwise. 

The following are the names of their children : Sarah, 
born in 1838 ; married to Peter Mingle ; reside near Pen- 
dleton. Mary A., married to James Keller. She died in 
1879, ^^^ ^^ buried atMenden. James was in the army of 
1861-5, Company G, Twelfth Indiana Volunteers, He 
died in the South, January 28, 1864 ; brought home, and is 
buried near Fortville. He was about twenty-four 3'ears of 
age. Irvin, married to Jennie Humphries ; reside one mile 
north-east of Eden ; is a Mason. Vandaline, married to 
Isaac S. Barrett. She died about the 3^ear 1880, and is 
buried at Menden. Elwood, married to Ola Gordon ; 
reside near Eden. He is one of the active men of Green ; 
owns and operates the sorghum factory at Eden, making 
sweetness by the million. He is one of the bright and 
active Masons of the county, a tip-top gentleman, and 
counts his friends by the score. A Republican in politics. 

JAMES M. LARRIMORE, M. D. 

One of the prominent men and physicians of the county 
is Dr. Larrimore. He is a son of Joseph Larrimore and 



414 THE PIONEERS OF 

grandson of Daniel Larrimore, prominent and early citi- 
zens of Fayette county, Indiana, and afterwards of Boone 
county, Indiana, where James M. was born in 1843, where 
his boyhood days were spent, and where he first went to 
school. His father died in Illinois back in the seventies. 
His mother died in Eaglevillage in 1852, and is buried 
there. J. M. Larrimore received a good education and 
studied medicine, and, after graduating, located at Car- 
rollton, Hancock county, in 1878, for the general practice, 
where he remained seventeen years, and all the time was 
kept busy, and built up a fine practice, which he left in 
1893, when he became a citizen of Greenfield. He resides 
on West Main street, w^here he owns a handsome residence. 
He was married to Florence Taylor about the year 1878. 
She resided five miles north-east of Greenfield. She is an 
accomplished lady, who, with the Doctor, has a host of 
friends throughout the county. Born April i, i860. 

The Larrimore family is quite numerous in Shelby, 
Fayette, Jefferson and Boone counties of the older set. 
Daniel, Morgan and Dr. Hugh Green came to Boone 
county in 1834, ^^^ *^^ whom had large families, mostly 
now deceased. Among the more prominent members j 
was acquainted with were James M., who died in 1849, 
and Dr. Jeremiah, who died in 1875. The former lived at 
Eaglevillage and the latter died at Whitestown, Indiana. 
Dr. James M. Larrimore is a thirty-two degree Mason. 
The following are the names of his children : Gertrude, 
Ivey (deceased), Nellie and Joseph W. 

MILTON ADDISON. 

Among the prosperous farmers of Jackson township is 
the one whose name heads this sketch. He is a son of 
Hon. John Addison, of the same township, where the 
family has lived for the past forty years, and one of prom- 
inence in political and church matters. Milton was married 
to Lizzie Wilson about the year i860. She was born in 




JOEL COOK. 
Died, 1870. 



^l6 THE PIONEERS OF 

Rush county, Indiana, daughter of Peter and Sarah A. 
(Mauzy) Wilson. Mr. Wilson resides at Willow Branch. 
Mr. and Mrs. Milton Addison are worthy members of 
the Christian Church at Nameless Creek, near their home. 
They are just in the prime of life and usefulness, and are 
held in high esteem among their many friends. 

WILLIAM H. PAULEY 

Was born in Jackson township, Hancock county, Indi- 
ana, March 23, 1850, son of Edward W. Pauley, who is 
yet living (1896). His mother's name before marriage 
was Nanc}^ McCorkle. She died in 1888, and is buried at 
the Simmons cemetery. William H. Pauley was married 
to Margaret E. Chft, May 30, 187 1, daughter of the late 
B. B. Clift, who died in 1895, and is buried at the Sim- 
mons cemetery. He was a worthy citizen of Jackson 
township for years, and a member of the Baptist Church. 
Mr. Pauley was elected Marshal of the city of Greenfield 
in 1875, Constable in 1882, and Sherift' in 1894 over J. W. 
McNamee, of Sugar-Creek township, a worthy competitor. 
Mr. P. is one among the most popular men that ever held 
office in the county ; of a make-up that draws friends and 
holds them. He is also one of the most prominent auction- 
eers of the country, far and near, and a member of the 
order of Red Men. 

The following are the names of Mr. Pauley's brothers 
and sisters: Phebe (dead), Joseph H., Jane, Andrew H. 
(dead), Mary (dead), Richard M. and Martha A. The 
deceased are buried at the Simmons cemetery. See Mr. 
Pauley's portrait on another page. 



HISTORY OF GILBOA CHURCH. 

A correspondent of the Hancock Democrat furnishes 
the following "history of the old Gilboa Church in Blue- 
River township : 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 417 

Among the first churches and rehgious organizations in 
this township was the Gilboa M. E. Church. This society was 
first orgahized about 1S30. Their meetings for worship were 
held at private houses for about two years, conducted princi- 
pally as prayer bands, with an occasional visit of a preacher in 
the neighborhood. At that time a preacher was a rare treat. 
He was not the polished sort, and had not the Wnc edifice to 
give his discourse from, but he spoke the gospel truths in a 
plain and well understood meaning to those old settlers in their 
cabin homes. As the membership began to increase, the soci- 
ety decided to build a church, which was erected of logs about 
the year 1S53 on ground donated for that purpose by James 
Sample and Benjamin Miller, two of the first members. This 
church was built near the present church site and graveyard. 
In the summer of 1S53 a frame building of more modern pat- 
tern was erected, which has served in the capacity of a church 
to this day. ' 

In an interview with one of the present members of this 
church we are informed that in the year 1S76 the enrollment 
was sixty-six members, being the largest of any year. The last 
enrollment, which was taken in the year 1SS4, shows a record 
of twenty-one members. There is now just an old fragment 
left of only six members, some moving away, others going to 
different churches, and many having died. There are no regu- 
lar Methodist services held at the church now, and have not 
been for several years past. 

On a recent visit to this old church and graveyard, which 
is held in high regard and loving remembrance by many friends, 
far and near, our thoughts glance back over the past and recall 
the many happy and joyful meetings which were held in the 
church, of the happy souls which have found peace with their 
Master within its walls. As we pass by, the door is closed ; 
everything is in silence. The same old trees stand at the rear 
of the house, and the place has that same old natural and famil- 
iar appearance as it did years ago. As we stop and gaze upon 
the old structure, which has stood so many years, we experience 
a feeling of sadness at the non-appearance of friends' faces 
who were so prominent among the congregation, which met 
there Sunday after Sunday in church and Sunday-school, who 

-5 



4l8 THE PIONEERS OF 

are now sleeping in the old graveyard just a few steps away. 
Just to the south of the building we enter the old graveyard, 
where hundreds are silently sleeping within the tomb, awaiting 
the resurrection morn. As we pass down among the numerous 
■graves we pause and glance around us, and sketch the sur- 
roundings as our thoughts lead to the short existence of life, 
and of the cold death that sooner or later will overcome every 
one and snatch them from this world, but the hope and blessed 
assurance of a brighter home above. How can any one fear 
death who is fully prepared to meet it, for the promises are so 
great. While down about the center of that city of the dead 
our attention was called to a small stone slab, which marks the 
memory of the first burial, the inscription on which reads : 
"Lydia Miller, daughter of B. and Susanna Miller, died Octo- 
ber 28, 1830, aged four years and one month." To the east a 
few steps we find the grave of James R. Hazlett, who died 
November 13, 1840. To the west again a few steps lie the 
remains of Catherine Lemay, who died December 20, 1830, and 
the graves of Andrew Hazlett, died in 1834 ; Deborah Miller, 
died in 1838 ; Jane Hazlett, died in 1832 ; Stephen Lemay, died 
in 1837. Down to the south-east of these graves a few steps 
we find a stone bearing this inscription : " In memory of 
Andrew Barrett, born December 23, 1804 ; departed this life 
September ir, 1833." These are among the first burials in this 
cemetery. 

Immediately in the vicinity of these are two more graves, 
that of Susanna, wife of Benjamin Miller, who died August 6, 
1854, and Benjamin Miller, bearing a stone with no date. These 
two people were among the oldest members of Gilboa church. 
Many of the graves of the first burials bear no stones, and 
never did, and several that did have stones are broken down 
and not in their proper places. In the northern part of the 
cemetery is the grave of Andrew B. Sample, with a small 
stone, bearing this inscription: "Born, July 11, 1818 ; died, 
September 9, 1834." Another close by has this : " Sally O., 
wife of William New, died October 15, 1835. 
" Strength and honor are the clothing, 
And she shall rejoice in the time to come." 

Also another stone close by bears the following : " Elizabeth, 








"i ^o-rAuoustxia F^-olDin.t* 



^ 



OtJ^/^ c/'}-i~C*-^>l4^Zy 




MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 419 

wife of Daniel New, died August 17, 1S39, aged forty-nine 
years, six months and eighteen days. 

" How lonely is the spot 

Thy gentle feet hath trod ; 
Thy angel voice I hear it not, 

For thou art with thy God." 

Among the many nice monuments is one located in the 
Sample sj^ace, which was erected by Calvary G. Sample, Sarah 
New, Margaret New and Mary Carr to the memory of their 
father and mother, with this inscription : "James Sample, 
born April 17, 1794, died August 34, 1866 :" also "Mary Sam- 
ple, born July 3, 1796, died July 36, 1SS5." 

" Oh, weep not for us, we were anxious to go 
To that haven of rest, where tears never flow ; 
We feared not to enter the dark, lonely ward, 
For soon we shall rise from this old church yard." 

These old people were two of the early members of Gilboa 
Church. Mrs. S. was a member fifty-six years. 

On another stone close by these graves is this : "John 
Sample, born 17S9, died 1S75, and Sarah Sample, born 1794, 
died 1872." Still another stone near these bears the inscription 
of the oldest person buried in the cemetery, as follows : " Mary, 
wife of George Sample, died December 2, 1847, aged 102 years." 
Going down farther south from these graves our attention was 
called to a small stone, that of Rev. Jonathan Lineback, an old 
minister of the gospel, who died in the year 1873, with this 
well fitted text, which, we are informed, was his great favorite. 
It was inscribed on an open book, and reads : 

" I have fought a good fight ; 
I have finished my course ; 
I have kept the faith." 

We have given a few of the many of the earliest settlers 
who are buried in this sacred lot. We could write much more 
about them, but time and space forbid. 

There are buried in this cemetery two soldiers of the Mex- 
ican war, five of the war of 1S12, and eighteen of the late war. 

Many fine and substantial monuments grace the old grave- 
yard. Among them are the Sample's, Hatfield's, Jeffries', 
Thompson's, Ross' and many others. This cemetery contains 



420 THE PIONEERvS OF 

over two acres, and is inclosed with a fence that which serves 
for the purpose. But such a large cemetery as this ought to 
have a more substantial and modern style fencing ; also receive 
the attention of a man employed to look after its interests, who 
could devote time in its welfare. It is notable that the proper 
attention is not given to cemeteries as there should be. We 
often hear of the sad and neglected condition of them. All 
are not expected to erect grand monuments to the graves of 
their friends, but more respect and attention could be given 
them, for soon these places will swallow our mortal beings. 
As it has been well said : " We are all gliding down the 
stream of time, and the places which now know us will know 
us no more, but our bodies will be consigned to similar abodes 
of those of dear friends who passed before." 



FRANKLIN A. BRIDGES, 

One of the enterprising young farmers of Hancock 
count}', is the one whose name heads this sketch, son of 
John and Elizabeth (Cory) Bridges, of Brown township. 
John Bridges was born in Fayette county, Indiana, in 
1823. Franklin A. Bridges was married to Hannah J. 
Beaver, January 16, 1870. She is a daughter of Abram 
and Elizabeth (Holland) Beaver. She was born, August, 
1847. Frank A. was born January 10, 1848. Names of 
Mr. and Mrs. Franklin A. Bridges' children : Albert E., 
Emma J., Laura E., Laurence E. and Louie E. Mrs, 
Abram Beaver died February 8, 1886, and is buried at the 
Harlan cemetery. Mr. and Mrs. Abram Beaver were 
born in Union county, Indiana, about the year 1818. I 
have known these two families. Bridges and Beavers, for 
the past thirty-five years, and am glad to give them a 
sketch in the Pioneer. 

J. K. HENBY. 

Mr. Henby was born in Blue-River township, Han- 
cock county, Indiana, on the 8th day of March, 1840, son 



yS^ 




GEORGE \V. PARKER, 
Ex-Countv Commissioner, Philadelphia, Ind. 



422 THE PIONEERS OF 

of Elijah Henby, a pioneer of Hancock county. He was 
born in North Carolina in 1796, and died in 1850. Mrs. 
Elijah Henby died in 1846. Both buried in Arkansas. 
J. K. Henby was married to Ruth A. Haskett, March 20, 
1868. She was born in Hancock county in 1844, daughter 
of Silas and Penina Haskett. Mr. Henby for the past 
twenty-five years has been engaged in the fruit and horti- 
culture business, first in a small way, but gaining year by 
year, until he now annually handles a vast quantity of 
trees, selling throughout the country extensively. He owns 
a fine farm of seventy-eight acres adjoining the city of 
Greenfield, a part of which is devoted to the growth of 
trees, vines and plants in endless variety. He has given 
horticulture much attention, and is known far and wide as 
one of our most extensive fruit growers. He was elected 
Township Trustee, November 6, 1894, as a Republican, 
something unusual in Center township. He was raised a 
Quaker, to which faith he is strongly attached. 

The following are the names of Mr. and Mrs. Henby's 
children : Otto J., died at the age of twelve years, and is 
buried at Walnut Ridge cemetery. Rush county, Indiana. 
Elijah A., born in 1873 ; Merium M., died at the age of six 
years, and is buried at Walnut Ridge cemetery ; Nora A., 
John W., Silas P. and Abbie. Mr. Henby is a member of 
the order of I. O. O. F. at Greenfield. I first became 
acquainted with Mr. H. in 1874 while he was selling trees 
in Madison county. 

NELSON BRADLEY, 

Banker, of Greenfield, was born in Clermont county, 
Ohio, May 19, 1822. His parents were William and Mary 
Bradley, the former a native of London, England, emi- 
grating to this country in 1797. He located in Clermont 
county, Ohio, where he taught school for several years, 
but subsequently engaged in farming. During the war of 
1812 he joined the American arm}-, and served with honor 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 42^ 

till the close of the contest. Nelson Bradley, the subject 
of this sketch, is eminently a self-made man. His oppor- 
tunities for acquiring an education in early life were very 
limited. His time was chiefly emploj^ed in assisting his 
father on the farm, and his schooling was restricted to a 
few months' attendance at the log school-house of the 
pioneer settlement. He managed, however, through that 
firmness of purpose and energy of character which have 
been a prominent quality of his life, to acquire sufficient 
knowledge of books to serve him as an educational basis 
in his successful business career. The inclination for trade, 
which indicated the bent of his mind toward the business 
of after life, was early developed, and while yet a boy he 
made frequent visits to the markets of Cincinnati with 
produce purchased at the farm-houses of the various set- 
tlements. In 1852 he made a visit to Indiana, and, being 
pleased with the country, purchased a small tract of land 
on the then newly constructed Bellefontaine Railroad, at 
the site of the present town of McCordsville, in Hancock 
county. In September of the same year he located there, 
and in the spring following opened a store. This may be 
considered the beginning of his prosperous business career. 
Always public-spirited and energetic, he soon succeeded 
in having a post-office and a railroad station established at 
his new place of residence, and became the first postmas- 
ter and the first railroad agent of the town. In connection 
with this store he carried on a general trading business, 
buying corn, wheat, hogs, etc., from the farmers, and by 
promptness and integrity established himself in the confi- 
dence and esteem of the people, and soon became known 
throughout the county as a man of ability and honesty. 
As a natural result of this public confidence he was elected 
in 1863 Treasurer of Hancock county, which position he 
held for two consecutive terms, although he did not remove 
his family to Greenfield, the county seat, until 1866. After 
the expiration of his last term of office he engaged in the 



424 THE PIONEERS OF 

grocery business at Greenfield, and continued in this until 
1871, when, with several other gentlemen, he established 
the Greenfield Banking Company, of which he is now the 
president. He is also connected, as half owner, with the 
Hancock Flouring-mills. Mr. Bradley has been a large 
stockholder in nearly all the gravel roads centering in 
Greenfield. He has contributed liberally toward the erec- 
tion of churches and public buildings, and has always 
been ready to aid in all that has tended to improve and 
develop the town and the county. He is an honored mem- 
ber of the Masonic Fraternity, having joined the order in 
Georgetown, Ohio, in 1845. He took the Chapter degrees 
in Felicity, Ohio, in 1848, and the Council and Scottish 
Rite degrees at Indianapolis at a later date. He assisted 
in organizing Oakland Lodge, No. 140, of which he was 
the first Junior Warden, and also McCordsville Chapter, 
No. 44, of which he was the first High-priest. He is now 
a member of Hancock Lodge, No. loi, of which he has 
been treasurer and trustee for man}- years. He has been 
a consistent member of the Methodist Episcopal Church 
since 1845. He was a Whig during the days of that part}-, 
and is now an enthusiastic Republican. He was married, 
September 29, 1844, to Elizabeth Gray, daughter of Chris- 
tian Gray, formerly a resident of Pennsylvania, and subse- 
quently one of the pioneers of Ohio. As before stated, 
Mr. Bradley is a man of great energy of character, with 
abilit}' to plan and skill to execute, as is fully attested by 
his success in ever}^ department of business he has under- 
taken. He possesses an even temper and fine social 
qualities ; enjoys a good joke and a hearty laugh ; and has 
a host of warm friends, endeared to him by his genial 
manner and kind disposition. 

The above sketch of the life of Nelson Bradley is 
taken from the Histor}- of the Representative Men of Indi- 
ana, which was written for it by a friend of his sixteen 
3'ears ago, which we think gives his life and character in 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 425 

as fitting words as we could employ, and his character and 
standing as a man and citizen as there stated has been 
more than verified. Uncle Nelson, as Mr. Bradley is 
usually called by his intimate friends, is to-day one of the 
most popular men in the county, unassuming, and unos- 
tentatious, who goes about his daily work, winning friends 
on all sides. Mr. Bradley is still an enthusiastic and 
ardent Republican, and, under the law of 1895, was 
appointed by Governor Matthews as one of the Republican 
members of the Board of Control for the Institution for 
the Blind. Under his first appointment his time expired 
December 31, 1895, but he had performed the duties of his 
trust so satisfactory that he was appointed without solicita- 
tion. Accompanying his commission was the following 
very flattering letter from the Governor : 

Executive Department, } 
Indianapolis, Ind., Dec. 31, 1895. j 

Hon. Nelson Bradley\ Greenfield., Indiana : 

Dear Sir : When a man performs a work thoroughly 
well, I have often thought it a good plan to keep him at it. 
Will you please accept the inclosed commission, reappointing 
you a member of the Board of Control for the Institution for 
the Blind ? I also desire to thank you for the faithful and con- 
scientious attention you have given to the duties connected 
with the position. Very truly yours, 

CLAUDE MATTHEWS, Governor. 

Mr. Bradley esteems this compliment, coming from 
the Governor as it did, very highly, and it is well deserved. 
Mr. Bradley has refused preferment by his party, wishing 
to remain the quiet, unobtrusive citizen. 

Since this sketch was written Mr. Bradley has become 
a member of Knightstown Commandery, No. 9, K. T., 
and of Murat Temple Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. He 
is a member of the Building Committee of Hancock Lodge, 
No. loi, F. and A. M., in building the new temple, and 
contributed to the building fund $1 ,000. He takes as much 



426 THE PIONEERS OF" 

interest in the same as if it were his own, and what Uncle 
Nelson Bradley says or suggests " goes without saying." 

Mr. Bradley's keen insight to business has enabled 
him, without seeming desire or labor, to accumulate a good 
deal of property, and he is regarded one of the wealthiest 
men in the county. He is not a miser, and gives much to 
charitable purposes, but in that quiet way that the commu- 
nity at large knows little about it. He is still President of 
the Greenfield Banking Company, owns large farming 
interests, and is a practical farmer, not a theoretic or book 
farmer ; is still in the milling business, being associated 
with J. C. Alexander. He is the President of the Board 
of Control for the Institution for the Blind, and of the 
Greenfield Gas Company. In fact, Mr. Bradley is con- 
nected with almost every business enterprise of his adopted 
city and county. 

Mrs. Bradley is one of the most benevolent women in 
Greenfield, She is always sought for when any of the 
citizens are in distress, and is ever ready to administer to 
the sick and poor, at any hour of the day or night. For 
years she has given this her time and study. Her happiest 
hours are spent around the sick bed while administering to 
the suffering and dying. It is pleasant to write thus of 
Mrs. B. and to know that in this day of show there is 
occasionally one whose love for their race and humanity 
brings them to the front. See Mr. and Mrs. Bradley's 
portraits on another page of the Pioneer. 

SENATOR MORGAN CHANDLER. 

It has taxed my utmost ability to write of men and 
women in the foregoing work, and now I find myself una- 
ble to write of Senator Chandler as I would desire. I have 
purposely delayed his sketch, hoping that some happy 
hour might dawn that I might catch an inspiration, in part, 
fitting me to say something worthy of my good friend, 
Morgan Chandler. For a period of near forty years he 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 427 

has been so closely associated with the affairs of Greenfield, 
socially, politically and religiously, that it would tax the 
ability of the best of them to give him anything like justice. 
He was born in Owen county, Kentucky, on the 30th day 
ot September, 1827. What a grand time and place to be 
born. The gods of tbrtune must have early honored that 
Kentucky home, and all along those years smiled on him. 
At the age of fitleen years we find Mr. Chandler 
wrestling with his A, B, C's, and in a few short months 
was learning others their D, E, F's. In 185 1 he came 
poor to Greenfield, where he has since resided, and " grown 
with its growth " and " strengthened with its strength." 
In 1854 ^^^ engaged in George G. Tague's store as clerk at 
ten dollars per month. This w^as about the first money he 
ever had of his own or obtained by his owm exertion. In 
the fall of the same year he was elected Sheriff' of Han- 
cock county, serving two years. In 1861 he was elected 
Clerk of the Hancock Circuit Court for a period of eight 
years. On the expiration of his term as Clerk he traveled 
extensively. East and West. In 1869 and 1870 he was a 
clerk in the store of Walker & Edwards, of Greenfield. A 
year or two later he commenced his banking career, which 
has been long and honorable, being to-day (1896) a stock- 
holder and director of the Greenfield Banking Company, 
with Nelson Bradley as president. I should have said 
before that Mr. Chandler is and has been a life-long Dem- 
ocrat, serving in both houses of the Indiana Legislature, 
with credit to himself and the district he represented. In 
1894 he received the nomination for Treasurer of State on 
the Democratic ticket, and ran many votes ahead of the 
ticket, especially in his own county. He, however, went 
down with the general crash that overtook his party that 
year. His agricultural interests have taken a wdde range, 
both practical and theoretical. He has been one of the 
prime movers in the organization and construction of the 
Hancock county agricultural fair ; also president of the 



428 THE PIONEERS OF 

tri-county fair of Henry, Rush and Hancock at Knights- 
town. His church relation has perhaps been the brightest 
of all. Long years he has been a member of the Christian 
Church at Greenfield, and from a few poor members he 
has witnessed its marvelous growth, till to-day the society 
worships in one of the finest churches in Indiana, dedicated 
February 23, 1896, by Elder Z. T, Sweeney, of Columbus, 
Indiana. Mr. C. has been liberal with his means in the 
erection of this edifice, giving near two thousand dollars 
from first to last. The memorial window on the west side 
that bears his name reflects poorly how he is held by those 
who worship within. 

Mr. Chandler was married to Nancy M. Galbreath, 
April 22, 1854 5 ^^^^ born in Kentucky, a lady of some of 
the noblest gifts allotted to womanhood. She was loved in 
life and lamented in death. She died January 27, 1893, 
little, if any, past the prime of life. No children were 
born to them. She is sleeping in Park cemetery, where a 
handsome monument marks her grave. Beautiful as it is 
in the sunlight of a bright May morning, it tells poorly of 
the one who is not dead but sleeping. 

THE CURRY FAMILIES. 

Captain Isaiah A. Curry, whose portrait appears on 
another page of the Pioneer, was born in Hancock county, 
Indiana, July 16, 1835. In December, 1857, he was mar- 
ried to Mary Thomas. In August, 1862, he enlisted in 
Company B, Eighty-ninth Indiana Volunteers, and was 
soon promoted to First Sergeant, then to Second Lieuten- 
ant and then Captain, in which capacity he was mustered 
out. In all those positions he was faithful and very popular 
with the comrades of his compan}' and regiment. In 1880 
he was elected Treasurer of Hancock county and served 
one term, Mr. Curry is a Democrat, and all the long 
years he has lived in the county he has won a host of 
friends. He is a member of the Masonic order, Greenfield 
Lodge, No, loi. 



430 



THE PIONEERS OF 



Among the first settlers of the county were the Currys. 
Two brothers, Isaiah and Samuel, with their large tamilies, 
came from Virginia in the year 1828. Soon after, others 
came, including brothers, cousins, etc., calculated to make 
an entire frontier settlement. They blazed a pathway 
through the dense wilderness north on the east side of 
Brandywine, over which the old Greenfield and Huntsville 
State road was afterward built, and about four miles north 
of Greenfield. When they raised their cabins and formed 
what was known as the Curry settlement, tlieir families 
large, and all well constituted for the arduous task before 
them in turning wilderness and woe into big fields and 
sunshine, soon made their marks in the improvement of 
the county. " Uncle Billy," as he was always called, 
settled on the farm now owned b}- Jesse J. Pratt, nnd 
there built a mill on Brandywine, in which he ground 
the corn for the daily bread of the hardy settlers. They 
were religiously inclined, and early banded themselves 
together, and erected a log house of worship, yet known 
as Curry's Chapel, the old log structure long since replaced 
by a frame building on the same spot. Of all the numer- 
ous families and their descendants, only two now remain 
in this county, those of Captain Isaiah A. Curry and Sam- 
uel F. Curry. 

JOHN H. BINFORD. 

Mr. Binford was born in Hancock county, Indiana, 
April 13, 1844, son of Robert and Martha Binford, now a 
resident of Greenfield, Indiana. I first met Mr. B. in 
1881, when I was wTiting up some matters for the county 
history. In the fall of that year he purchased my interest 
and, in connection with the late James K. King, completed 
the work. My relations socially and in a business way 
have always been on my part satisfactory. About the year 
1890 he lost his wife, a splendid woman, just in the prime 
of life. Her maiden name was Lucy Coggeshall. Four 
children were born of this marriage, Edgar A., Gertrude, 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 43 1 

Robert J. and Paul F. Mr. B. was again married in 
1893. 

Following will be found a sketch taken from a Chi- 
cago business pamphlet : 

One of the oldest practitioners and loan agents in Indiana 
and one of the self-made men of the State is Mr. J. H. Bin- 
ford, financially a man of more than ordinary wealth and a 
lawyer of undoubted ability. Mr. Binford was adinitted to the 
bar in 1879 in Greenfield and has since that period combined 
the practice of law with the main business of mortgage in- 
vestments on prime securities in Hancock county. He is a 
man of cautious tendencies, conservatively inclined in making 
appraisements and his record a continuous round of business 
successes best attests his ability and reliability in placing loans. 
He has never had any foreclosures nor delinquent interest ac- 
count during sixteen years of investments. His clients who 
are individual investors number nearly fifty private investors in 
the Eastern and Middle States, some of his investors reside in 
Florida and Iowa. Being fully conversant with values in Han- 
cock and adjoining counties, and familiar with the moral hazard 
a necessary prequisite in conjunction with the physical hazard 
in placing loans upon desirable securities. Mr. Binford has 
made probate law and collections a specialty of his professional 
work. He has been the active representative of the Connecti- 
cut Mutual Life Insurance Company in the loan department 
for fourteen years. He has placed over $100,000 annually on 
first mortgage loans and has handled altogether over one million 
dollars. Mr. Binford is conservative in his valuations and 
makes personal examination of all property upon which loans 
are desired. He is a gentleman of culture and brilliant educa- 
tional attainments, having served as County Superintendent 
from 1S73 to 1871^. He is the author of the History of Han- 
cock County, written in 1882, a volume of over five hundred 
pages, teeming with felicitous statements with reference to the 
pioneers of this section who hewed their way to fame, fortune 
and prominence in the upbuilding of the county, a work elicit- 
ing warm enconiums from Hon. William H. English, of Indi- 
anapolis. 



432 THE PIONEERS OF 

GEORGE WALKER. 

One of the prominent men of Jackson township is Mr. 
Walker. He was born in Hancock county, Indiana, about 
the year 1845, and at this writing (1896) is near fifty years 
of age, or, in other words, on the hill-top of life, looking 
both ways. He was married to Nancy Dinsmore, of Rush 
county, about the year 1866. George received a good 
common education, and, by reading extensively, is well 
informed, especially on the political matters of the day. 
He is a free thinker, and identified with the Populist party, 
and a speaker of no ordinary ability. A true lover of lib- 
erty and his country, and his best efforts are put forth to 
further the cause of American freedom. He is a son of 
the late Meredith Walker, who lived so long in Jackson. 
He died in 1882. He was born in North Carolina in 1814, 
and came first to Rush county, Indiana, then to Hancock 
county in 1837. ^^ ^^^ ^^^ times married, first to Miss 
Oldham, second time to Miss Wales, third time to Miss 
Bramer, fourth time to a sister of the third wife, and fifth 
time to Catharine Nankins, who survives him, and resides 
in Carroll county, Indiana. Meredith Walker was an active 
member of the Christian Church and independent in poli- 
tics. He, as well as his deceased wives, are buried at the 
Simmons cemetery, near his old home. The following are 
the names of his children : Sarah, Samuel, George, John, 
Jane, Lindsay, Riley, Louiza, Leonard and Johnson. 

ELDER T. H. KUHN. 

Elder Kuhn was born in Hancock county, Indiana, 
about the year i860, son of George Kuhn. His mother's 
name was Miss Johnson, daughter of the late Thomas 
Johnson. ' Elder Kuhn received a good common education 
in the schools of his neighborhood up to the age of about 
eighteen years, when he decided to continue his studies in 
the higher branches. He went to Butler College for a 
term of years, and studied for the ministr}^ his chosen 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. ^^;^ 

profession. After completing his education he entered the 
Meld of future usefulness, and to-day (1896) is actively in 
the work, and located at .Tipton, Indiana. He is well 
received and commands a full house wherever he preaches. 
In person Mr. K. is of commanding appearance, full six 
feet high, and a clear, full voice, which at once commands 
the closest attention. He was married to Emma Collins, a 
daughter of William and Hepsabeth (Bunker) Collins, 
about the year 1886. Mrs. Kuhn is a granddaughter of 
the late Thomas Collins, an earh^ settler of both Madison 
and Hancock counties, whose portrait appears on another 
page of this work. 

Elder Kuhn is a tine conversationalist, and fairly well 
posted on matters generally, hence his success and deserved 
popularity with the people generally. Glad to give Mr. 
and Mrs. Kuhn a notice in my work. 

The first time I ever met the Elder was at Charlottes- 
ville, Indiana, where he had preaching one night. During 
the evening a big dog entered the church, just before 
services began. Mr. K. seeing him, said: "Will some 
one put that dog out, as it is not best to have a coon and 
dog together." This timely hit brought down the house, 
dispelling to some extent the more serious part of the 
evening services. 

TREMILLIUS N. JACKSON. 

Mr. Jackson was born in Rush count}', Indiana, June 
25, 1846, son of Isaiah and Martha (Chappell) Jackson. 
T. N. Jackson was raised a Baptist, and belongs to that 
church ; also reared a Democrat, and has acted with that 
party since his majority. He is now^ (1896) and had been 
some 3'ears previous postmaster at Maxwell, Indiana, where 
he resides and is engaged in general merchandise. He 
has a good trade, and is popular with the people ; licks 
stamps when required, and writes letters for the patrons 
merely for accommodation. He believes in matrimony, if 
36 



434 



THE PIONEERS OF 



one may judge from his being four times married, and yet 
only in his prime. As far as he is concerned he does not 
intend that the good name of Jackson shall perish and 
become obsolete. 

Mr. Jackson's first wife's name was Matilda Fuller ; is 
deceased and buried at the Maple Grove cemetery. He 
was the second time married to Indiana Frazier. She is 
buried at the Reeves cemetery- ; third time to Mrs. Shiply. 
She is also buried at the Reeves cemetery. His fourth 
wife's name was Mary C. Clark. This marriage occurred 
June 24, 1884. Children's names: Albert C, Oscar C, 
Edwin B., Isaiah L,, Tremillius N. P., Frank, Edgar C, 
and an infant daughter died. Mr. Jackson is a pleasant 
gentleman. Call and see him. 

W. R. JONES. 

Comrade Jones was born in Ashtabula county, Ohio, 
in 1829, and at the age of ten years he started west, and 
stopped at Eaton, Ohio, but I will let him tell it in his own 
way : "I think I was about ten years old when my father 
sold out his farm in Ashtabula county, Ohio, and started 
for Illinois, but stopped at Eaton, Ohio. This was in 1840, 
the year of 'log cabins and hard cider.' I call to mind 
seeing General Harrison and hearing him make a speech 
then and there. My father operated a cheese factory there 
for sometime in connection with a dairy. In the year 1843 
we moved farther west, to the State of Indiana, stopping 
in Henry county, near Lewisville. Here my mother died ; 
also a brother and sister. This was a sad blow to us, and 
from which I never recovered. In a few years my father 
remarried to Mrs. Daniel Custard. This put together two 
families of children, ranging in age from six to fourteen 
years. At the age of sixteen years I went to Cambridge 
City, and worked there and at Cincinnati, Ohio, till I was 
twenty-one years old, when I thought it about time to get 
a permanent home of my own ; casting about for a help- 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 435 

meet, as was quite natural tor one of that age to do. At 
last I found one that I married, Miss Frances C. Custard. 
I found in her all that one could desire, and we lived 
together near torty-one years. She was a noble woman, 
always kind and read}^ in sickness or health, to perform 
the duties of a true christian ; and now I had to endure a 
second hard blow along life's rugged way in the death of 
one so good and kind. She died near Greenfield in 1891 
at the age of fift\'-nine years, six months and seventeen 
days. She is buried at the Park cemetery, where there is 
a modest slab to mark her resting place till the morning of 
the general resurrection. She died very suddenly of heart 
trouble. 

" Now I will give you a short sketch of my army life, 
beginning in the year 1862. At that time I was living 
north-east of Knightstown, Indiana, in a Qiiaker settle- 
ment. I volunteered under the call for three hundred 
thousand at the age of thirty-two years, with a famih', 
consisting of a wife and seven children, four boys and 
three girls, the oldest about eleven years of age. I was 
living on a farm, which has been my main occupation most 
of my life. On the 6th day of August, 1862, I went to 
Knightstown, and enlisted in the Nineteenth Indiana Bat- 
tery. On the 8th of August I went to Indianapolis, went 
into camp, and was there mustered into the United States 
service. Soon after we received marching orders to go to 
Kentuck}'. Our first stopping place was Munfordsville, 
on Green River, to guard the bridge there. Alter a few 
days here we got orders to go to Perryville, Kentucky, 
where our battery took a very active part one day from one 
o'clock till dark, when our lines were broken and we went 
to the rear, leaving tour pieces on the field. 

The next gjeneral enoao-ement was at Nashville, Ten- 
nessee, after which we went into camp at Murfreesboro. 
After breaking camp there we started on a campaign that 
lasted till after the battle of Chickamauga, • Then Sherman 



436 THE PIONEERS OF 

took command, and I can't now tell all battles we were in. 
Our battery was in all the fights, taking an active part all 
the time, never in the rear, but always to the front. The 
main engagements we were in during the long marches 
were Chickamauga, Lookout Mountain, Mission Ridge, 
Ringold, Resacca, Keresaw Mountain, Peach Tree Creek, 
and Atlanta, besides numerous skirmishes and repeated 
shellings along the line. Our battery was a noted one tor 
execution and active service, 

" Pardon me, Mr. Harden, in a word about myself. I 
was Sergeant in the Nineteenth Indiana Battery, and was 
awarded the first prize as the best shot or gunner in the 
battery. I could give you a long letter about the marches 
and battles of the war of 1861-5, but perhaps enough on 
this subject. 

" I reside three miles south-west of Greenfield, and 
own eighteen acres of land, which I delight to cultivate in 
my declining years. I receive eight dollars per month 
pension. I came to Hancock count}^ in 1872, and expect 
to end my days here, and to lie down at last by the side of 
my dear wife in the Park cemetery in Greenfield. 
CHARLES DOWNING. 

It gives me pleasure to write of one so deserving as 
Mr. Downing, who, under so many disadvantages in life, 
has gained a position that any man might be proud of. 
Mr. Downing was born in New York City on the 7th day 
of August, 1857. At the age of ten years he found his 
way to the West, and at Greenfield, Indiana, where he now 
resides. During the first few years of his residence in 
Greenfield he made his home with the late William S. Wood. 
In 1874 ^^^ ^v^s appointed deputy County Clerk by Ephraim 
Marsh, who was then Clerk of the Hancock Circuit Court. 
Filling the place so admirably, he was continued as deputy 
until the expiration of Mr. Marsh's second term, and was 
elected to succeed Mr. Marsh in 1882, and re-elected, 1890, 
serving as deputy eight years and as Clerk eight, in all 




CHARLES DOWNING, 
Greenfield, Indiana. 



438 THE PIONEERS OF 

sixteen years, and to the entire satisfaction of the people 
of Hancock county. 

At the close of his first term as Clerk, Mr. Downig 
studied law, and in a due course of time was admitted to 
practice, and in a short time became a member of the law 
firm of New, Downing & New, composed of the late James 
A. New, Charles Downing and Asa M. New, and contin- 
ued in the practice until he was again elected Clerk, in 
1890. At the expiration of his second term he again 
resumed the practice of law, and associated with him 
William A. Hough, oldest son of Hon. William R. Hough. 

Mr. Downing is a member of the Indiana State Board 
of Agriculture, President of the Hancock County Agricul- 
tural Association, and in February, 1895, was unanimously 
recommended by the Indiana State Board of Agriculture 
tor the appointment as one of the Trustees of Purdue 
University. In July of the same year he was appointed by 
Governor Matthews one of said Trustees, which office he 
resigned to accept the appointment of Prosecuting Attor- 
ney for the Eighteenth Judicial Circuit, to fill the vacancy 
caused bv the death of John L. McNew. Mr. Downing 
has served as Jur}^ Commissioner, anc^ also City Commis- 
sioner. 

Mr. Downing is a member of Mystic Shrine, Ancient 
and Accepted Scottish Rite Masons, Knightstown Com- 
mandery, and Hancock Lodge, No. loi, F. and A. M., 
and has twice served as Master of his lodge. He is also 
a member of Greenfield Lodge, No. 135, I. O. O. F., and 
Eureka Lodge, No. 20, K. of P. Through a long series 
of years he has served the people of Hancock county with 
fidelity and honor. 

Mr. Downing was married to Angle B. Williams, 
October 8, 1879, at Bradford Junction, Ohio, and soon after 
commenced keeping house in Greenfield. They have three 
children. Their home is one of comfort, and there they 
delight to receive their friends. 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 439 

HON. DAVID S. GOODTNG. 

Judge David S. Gooding was born in Fleming county, 
Kentucky, January 20, 1824. His father, Asa Gooding, 
and his mother, Matilda Gooding, were native Kentuckians. 
His grandfather, David Gooding, was a Captain in the war 
of 181 2, and in the battle of the Thames, and by the sol- 
diers under his command it was believed, in which opinion 
he concurred, that it was he and not Colonel R. M. John- 
son that in that battle killed the famous Indian Chief and 
warrior, Tecumseh. That he in that battle took the scalp 
of an Indian officer of rank there is no question. Judge 
Gooding, on his father's side, is related to the Thomas and 
Collins families, and on his mother's side to the numerous 
Hunt and Alexander families of Kentucky. 

Judge Gooding's father, in 1827, removed from Ken- 
tucky to Rush county, Indiana, and from there to Greenfield, 
Hancock county, in December, 1836, and was elected 
School Commissioner of Hancock county in 1840, and died 
in 1842. In 1839 Judge Gooding became a member of 
the Methodist Episcopal Church, and subsequently was five 
years President of the County Bible Societ}', and for sev- 
eral years Superintendent of the Sabbath-school. He also 
taught a common school for six months. In the fall of 
1839 ^^^ became a student at Asbury University (now 
DePauw College), and recited many lessons to President 
Simpson, afterwards Bishop Simpson, of the M. E. Church, 
for whom he had the highest regard and affection. Among 
his fellow-students were United States Senator Harlan, of 
Iowa, United Senator Booth, of California, Governor Por- 
ter, of Indiana, Judge Franklin, Rev. R. D. Robinson, 
Hon. Joseph E. McDonald, Rev. T. A. Goodwin, General 
David Reynolds, Rev. James F. Jaques and Rev. Edwin 
Black. Judge Gooding was twice President of the Philo- 
logical Society. Before he was more than half through 
the regular course of studies his father died, and he was 
compelled for want of means to return to his home and end 



440 



THE PIONEERS OF 



his college career, after which he studied law for a brief 
time with Hon. George W. Julian, then a resident of 
Greenfield, and was admitted to the bar in 1845. 

In March, 1844, he married Frances Maria Sebastian, 
who was born in Scott county, Kentucky, a daughter of the 
late William Sebastian, ex-Clerk of the Circuit Court of 
Hancock county, Indiana. (The late John T. Sebastian, 
ex-Clerk of the said Court, was her brother). Their mar- 
ried life extended over fifty years. A true and good wife 
and a christian woman, died January 6, 1895, leaving 
surviving her, her husband and only one child, Marshall 
B. Gooding, a law3'er. 

In 1847 Judge Gooding was elected to represent Han- 
cock county in the House of Representatives. In 1848 he 
was elected County Prosecuting Attorney for three years. 
In 185 1 he was nominated by the Democracy and elected 
Prosecuting Attorney for the Indianapolis Circuit, com- 
posed of Hancock, Shelby, Johnson, Marion, Hendricks 
and Boone counties, defeating ex-Governor David Wallace 
for that office. In 1852 he was nominated for the Common 
Pleas Judgeship for the counties of Hancock and Madison, 
and resigned the Prosecutorship, and was elected to the 
Judgeship for four years, defeating Judge John Davis, of 
Anderson. In 1856 he was elected State Senator for four 
years for the counties of Hancock and Madison, defeating 
Hon. H. H. Hall. In 1857-8 he was editor of the Han- 
cock Democrat. In 1861 he was again elected Judge for 
the counties of Hancock, Henry, Rush, Decatur and Mad- 
ison for three years, to fill a vacancy, defeating Judge E. 
B. Martindale, now of Indianapolis. 

During the war of the rebellion he was a war Demo- 
crat and zealous Union man, and acted with the Union 
(not Republican) party, and in 1864 his name for Presiden- 
tial Elector at large headed the ticket for Lincoln and 
Johnson, and made more speeches for that ticket in Indiana 
than any other living man. In the winter of 1864-5 ^^^ ^'*^ 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 44I 

recommended to President Lincoln for the Mission to Chili 
by Governor Morton, Governor Hovey, Governor Baker, 
Hon. Richard W.Thompson, all the Judges of the Supreme 
Court of Indiana, and by a joint caucus of the Union mem- 
bers of the Indiana Legislature and man}' other prominent 
and leading Union men of the State. 

In June, 1865, President Johnson, of his own volition, 
without any formal recommendation therefor, by telegram, 
tendered Judge Gooding the appointment of United States 
Marshal for the District of Columbia, which office was 
accepted and the duties thereof entered upon at once. He 
continued to hold that office during President Johnson's 
term, and resigned in the latter part of March, 1869. He 
was with President Johnson much of the time, in public 
and private, and had his confidence, and fully believes that 
no honester or more patriotic man was in public life, and 
that no truer friend of the Constitution and Union ever 
lived or died than Andrew Johnson, ex-President of the 
United States. Judge Gooding, soon after his resignation 
of the United States Marshalship, returned to his home in 
Greenfield, where he has continuously had his residence 
for more than fifty. nine years, and now resides. 

In 1870 he was the nominee of the Democratic party 
for Congress in the district then represented by Hon. 
George W. Julian, then known as the Burnt District, and 
largely Republican. His Republican competitor was Judge 
Jeremiah M. Wilson, now a distinguished lawyer of Wash- 
ington City, D. C. The campaign was exciting and well 
fought on either side. The official returns showed Judge 
Wilson elected by the meager majorit}- of four votes in a 
district of 30,000 voters, but in fact Judge Gooding was 
elected by a majority of at least seventeen votes, and con- 
tested Wilson's election, but failed to obtain the seat by a 
party vote in the United States House of Representatives, 
the Republicans having a large majority in the House at 
that time. 



442 THE PIONEERS OF 

Judge Gooding and Judge Wilson were again the 
candidates, of their respective parties for Congress in 1872. 
This was in the Greel}' campaign, an unfortunate year for 
Democratic candidates, and Judge Wilson was elected by 
a small majority, that majority being composed largely of 
imported sewing machine peddlers and college students, 
non-residents of the district. 

In 1877 Judge Gooding was the President of the Dem- 
ocratic State Convention, which was held at Indianapolis, 
January 8, 1877, in regard to the fraudulent, pretended 
election of R. B. Ha3^es to the Presidency. In 1878 he 
was a candidate before the Democratic State Convention 
for Secretary of State, and had the highest vote on the first 
ballot, but was finalh" defeated by Hon. John G. Shanklin, 
who was nominated and elected. In 1880 Judge Good- 
ing's name was at the head of the Hancock and English 
Presidential Electoral ticket for Indiana. In this campaign 
he made a very thorough canvass of this State. In 1884 
he was nominated and elected to the Indiana House of 
Representatives, and was defeated for the Speakership by 
Hon. Charles L. Jewett, but was made Chairman of the 
Democratic Joint Caucus Committee of the House of Rep- 
resentatives and Senate. He claims that during the two 
sessions of this Legislature he was instrumental in prevent- 
ing the passage of obnoxious measures, saving to the 
people of the State at least one hundred thousand dollars. 
In 1886 he was defeated for Representative because of a 
local feud in the party, defeating most of the county ticket. 
In 1888 he was on the District Presidential Electoral Dem- 
ocratic ticket. Since then he has not been a candidate for 
any office. 

In June, 1891, he was elected and commissioned a 
member of the School Board of the city of Greenfield for 
the term of three years, and was elected President of the 
Board, and served as such until the expiration of his term. 
He novv renides in Greenfield, but has a law office in 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 443 

Indianapolis, and is in active law practice there. In poli- 
tics, he is now, as always heretofore, on the side of the 
masses of the people, a Democrat on the old principles of 
that party, in favor of the coinage and legal tender of silver 
and gold on equal terms, and greenbacks or treasury notes, 
all legal tender alike for all debts, public and private, and 
opposed to National banks of issue. 

In addition to the foregoing, it may be added that he 
has made two general campaigns as a speaker for the 
Democracy in Ohio at the request of the State Committee, 
one in the William Allen and the other in the Hon. Thomas 
Ewing campaigns for Governor. In 1888 he made, at the 
request of the Democratic National Committee, campaign 
speeches in the State of Maine, for which he was highl}' 
complimented by the State Committee. In 1892 he was 
again invited by the National Democratic Committee to 
make campaign speeches, and that he might choose the 
State, but this invitation he declined for reasons not neces- 
sary at this time to state. 

The great length of the foregoing forbids an}- detailed 
notice of him as a lawyer. Suffice to say that for many 
years he was a leading lawyer at the bar, and had a large 
and lucrative practice in this and adjoining counties and in 
the Supreme Court, and about thirty years ago was admit- 
ted to the bar of the Supreme Court of the United States 
on motion of United States Attorney-General Stanbury. 
He is now the oldest living ex-Representative and ex-State 
Senator in Hancock county, and the oldest living Common 
Pleas Judge of Hancock and Madison counties, the oldest 
living County and Circuit Prosecuting Attorney of this 
county, and the only Democratic citizen of Hancock county 
ever nominated for Congress, and the oldest living United 
States Marshal of the District of Columbia, and the oldest 
living United States Marshal for the Supreme Court of the 
United States, and yet he is now in the active practice of 
the law. 



'> - u 




NEW CHRISTIAN CHURCH, GREENFIELD, IND. 
Erected, 1895. 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 445 

GONE liUT NOT FORGOTTEN. 

Hancock county, like all other counties or communities, 
has and will have men and women who, by their talent or 
surroundings, or both, have been to the front, socially, politi- 
cally or religiously. It is in the nature of things that it is so. 
It is said that history repeats itself in all lands and all nations, 
everything else being equal. From the very beginning of 
creation down to 1896 men and women have come to the front 
in the various demands as they were needed, filled their places 
and passed away. The work of some has been heralded abroad, 
written in letters of light that will live forever. Others have 
done their work in a quiet way; not wishing, in fact not desir- 
ing, that their acts should be known to the outside world. It 
is the object of this part of my work to notice a few men and 
women who have lived and died here, who from surroundings 
have become more or less conspicuous in our history, that their 
names may live and be a stimulus to those who may come 
after to strive to emulate their virtues and good works. In 
writing of those whose names mav follow it is my desire to 
write of them truthfully and sincerely. I do not claim that 
they were better than their associates in life, but rather because 
history demands that their memory live and their deeds kept 
sight of. Some lived within the limits of their early home, 
near where they cleared away the timber and brush in early 
days. Others went West. The exact time and place of all 
their deaths will not be strictly vouched for, but as accurate as 
can now be obtained. Some will, I fear, be entirely overlookefl. 
Some will ask, why is not Mr. A. spoken of in this work ? He 
was a pioneer. Why is Mr. B. not mentioned in the Pioneer ? 
He was one of the first men in the county or township. And 
there is Mrs. C, that grand old lady, who did so much for the 
church. Her name is nowhere to be found. In answer to 
these well taken interrogatories I will say on first sight that 
blame would seem to attach to the compiler, but if you knew 
all, these questions would never be asked. Here is the solution. 
I went to the son or daughter of Mr. A. to get some dates, that 
I might remember him, but nothing could be obtained. I went 
the same way to the relatives of Mr. B., Mrs. C, etc. Letters 
without number have been written to inquire when Mr. A. 



446 THE PIONEERS OF 

died and where buried, but no answer came, and so on through 
the alphabet ; but I am glad to say that many have responded, 
and helped me to reclaim some facts and history that would 
have soon been lost forever ; and, while despair often came over 
me, hope and light sprang up as I gathered the names of some 
of the grand men and women who early came to Hancock 
county, and in my poor way have wrote of them as best I 
could. Some of them I never saw, and can not be accused of 
writing of them partially. Others I knew personally, and 
heard them talk, sing and pray, and, as I shall answer to God 
in a coming day, I have wrote of them, from my stand-point, 
in no unthoughtful way, nor to pass away time, but often paused 
to brush away a tear as I tried to say something in memory of 
those names which will now follow : 

Joseph Chapman was for many years a prominent man of 
Hancock county, and was in the State Legislature. In 1S47 he 
volunteered to go to the Mexican war, helped organize a com- 
pany, and went. He died there April 3, 1S48. 

Thomas D. Walpool was born in Ohio in 1S16, and was for 
many years an active politician and attorney of Hancock 
county, and was in the State Senate several terms. He died in 
Indianapolis in 1863. In 1S40 he was married to Esther Brayan, 
of Centerville, Indiana. In person Mr. W. was well formed, 
fair skin, and hair inclined to redness. He was a hue speaker. 
He was a member of the State Constitutional Convention in 
1850; was formerlv a Whig, but after 1853, a Democrat. 
' Hiram Tyner resided for years in Blue-River township ; 
was elected County Commissioner in 1861. He died in 1867, 
and is buried at the Hlnchman cemetery. 

Daniel Wilkinson resided for many years in Brown town- 
ship ; was elected Justice of the Peace in 1842, and County 
Commissioner in 18:5=5. He was married five times, and is the 
father of Nathan, Hutt and Benton Wilkinson, of Knightstown. 
He died in 1873. His second wife. Miss Johnson, is buried at 
Greensboro cf^metery. He was an old Whig, born in Virginia 
about the year 1800. His first wife is buried in Virginia, where 
he was born. He is buried at Knightstown, Indiana. 

Mrs. Matilda Gooding, one of the noble women of Green- 
field, wife of Asa Gooding, was born in Kentucky in 1823. 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIP^S. 447 

She died in 1S91. Mr. Gooding died in 1842. They came to 
Greenfield in 1S26. Children's names : David S., Lemuel W., 
Oliver P., Henry C, William H., Elvira M. and Cinderella, 
wife of the late Noble P. Howard, Sr. 

James K. King was a prominent man for y^'^i's in Brown 
township ; was elected County Surveyor, and helped write up 
the history of the county in iSSi in connection with John H. 
Binford. Mr. King was born in Indiana in iSiS. In 1839 he 
was married to Irene Wilson. He died in 1S84. 

Ephraim Thomas lived many years in Hancock county. 
He was elected County Commissioner in 1866, and served the 
people that elected him with fidelity. He died in 1882. He 
was a brother of John, David and Taylor W. 

Taylor W.Thomas was elected Sheriff of Hancock county 
in 1858 and i860. At one time perhaps one of the best known 
men in the county. 

George Henry was born in Ireland about the year iSoo, 
and at the age of eight years came to America. He lived for 
several years in Green township, was Associate Judge in Mad- 
ison county, and in 1844 was elected to represent Hancock 
county in the State Legislature. Died in Pendleton in 1853. 
His wife died in 1862. Both buried at Pendleton. They were 
the parents of Congressman Charles L Henry and the late 
Major Samuel Henry, who wa«; killed in 1864 in Missouri ; also 
Mrs. W. V. Shanklin, of Anderson. 

Dr. William Trees resided in Warrington for over forty 
years, and was a splendid doctor and man. He was born in 
Ohio in 1809. Died at Warrington in 1S92. A Mason for 
years, to which he was much devoted. 

Hiram Harlan was born in South Carolina about the year 
1800, and in the prime of life came to Brown township, where 
he owned a fine farm up to 1S63, when he went to Kansas, 
where he died fifteen years later. A grand, good man and 
Baptist preacher and an old-time Whig. He furnished two or 
three sons for the wai" of 1S61-5. 

Stephen Harlan, brother of Hiram, was also born In South 
Carolina. Came to Sugar-Creek township in an early day, 
built a mill and helped organize a church and helped build a 



448 THE PIONEERS OF 

house on his hind in 1S58. He died in 1877 ; is buried at the 
cemetery bearing his name near the old home. 

John Nibarger was born in Ohio in 18 14. Came to Han- 
cock county in 1830 and settled on Sugar Creek; thrice mar- 
ried. He died in 1883. He will be remembered as a good 
farmer and citizen; is buried at the Harlan cemetery. 

Phineas Thomas was born in Kentucky in 1765 and came 
to Hancock county in 1S36, where he resided until his death in 
1847; buried at Pleasant Hill or Willow Branch cemetery. He 
was a pioneer of Rush county, Indiana, also. Children's 
names: Martha, Elizabeth, Margaret, Nancy, Alfred, John, 
David, Ephraim and Taylor W. He was eighty-two years of 
age at the time of his death. 

Jonas Marsh, one of the old settlers of Brown township, 
was born in Virginia in 1796. He came to the county in 1837, 
where he lived till his death in 1877. He was married in Ten- 
nessee to Miss Kennedy, by whom he had five children, as 
follows : George, Henrv, Elizabeth, Rebecca and Alay J. The 
second time married to a sister of his first wife. The following 
are the names of children by this marriage : William, Mont- 
gomery, Matilda, Martha, Ephraim and John. A grand family of 
Hancock county. Henry, Montgomery, Ephraim and William 
have all filled responsible places in the county. Jonas Marsh 
is buried near Warrington, Indiana. Henry died in February, 
1S96. 

Reuben A. Riley, so long and well known in Greenfield, 
where his best days were spent and where he, in the prime of 
life, 1S47, went to the Mexican war. He was as early as 1844 
elected to the Indiana Legislature from Hancock county. A 
successful attorney for years at the Greenfield bar. He was 
also in the late war, in Company G, Eighth Indiana Volunteers, 
and Captain of a company of Fifth Indiana Cavalry. He was 
of Irish descent, born about the year 1S16; died in Greenfield, 
Indiana, about the year 1894. He is the father of J. W. Riley, 
so well known all over the country, especially in literary cir- 
cles. Reuben A. Riley will long be remembered as one of the 
prominent men of Hancock county. 

Mrs. John McCray, a grand lady, who resided so long near 
Warrington, has left the impress of her life and character on 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 449 

those around her, which will not soon fade away. She died in 
1S92, and is buried near her old home. 

Benjamin Freeman, a prominent man, lived near Palestine 
for many years. He was born in Ohio in 1S27, and was in 
business at Pajestine and a general trader there up to his death, 
in 1S84. In 185^ he was married to Mary A. Mapple, of Rush 
county, Indiana. Mr. F. is buried near Palestine. A Repub- 
lican and Methodist, and the father of four children. 

Samuel Arnett resided near Fortville all his life, being 
born just west a short distance. He served in many important 
places. He died in Fortville in 1S92. A Mason of long stand- 
ing. He is buried at the Arnett cemetery, on the edge of 
Hamilton county, north-west of Fortville. Son of Thomas 
Arnett. 

Shadrach H. Arnett, one of the foremost men of Buck- 
Creek township, was born in Franklin county, Indiana, in 
1S19 and came to this cf)untv in 1S31, with his father, William 
Arnett. He was an active member of the Baptist Church and 
a Mason, who delighted in the order. He died in 1S79. His 
wife died in 1894; both buried near their old home on Buck 
Creek. 

Mrs. William Walker was born in North Carolina in 
1820, and came to the county about the year 1836. "Her 
name before marriage was Payne. She lived many 3'ears near 
Mt. Zion Baptist Church, of which she was an honored mem- 
ber. She died in 1893, and is buried at Mt. Zion cemetery, six 
miles north-west of Greenfield, aged seventy-two years. 

Lysander Sparks was long an active man of Hancock 
county and merchant and trader at Warrington. He served 
eight years as Auditor of the county, being elected first in 1S50. 
He resides in the West, perhaps in Missouri, and at this writing 
( 1896) he is near ninety years of age. He is a Democrat, and at 
one time was very popular with the people of Hancock county. 

Thomas R. Noel for nearly fifty years was an active busi- 
ness man of Fortville and vicinity. When a lad he came from 
Indianapolis, and from first to last and up to his death in 1883 
was on duty. Was railroad agent at the start in 185 1, post- 
master for a quarter of a century and in the late war in the 
Twelfth Indiana Volunteers, 
27 



450 



THE PIONEERS OF 



Joseph Cahen was an enterprising man at Alfont and 
Fortville for twenty-five years. He died about the year 1886. 
He was married to Lyda Huston, who was born near Alfont. 
She resides in Fortville, and is a lady of many virtues and ac- 
complishments and a daughter of one of the early settlers of 
Lick Creek. Mr. C. was Trustee of Green township for years. 

Baisl G. Jay was a prominent man of Buck-Creek town- 
ship. He was born in North Carolina in 1796. In 1822 he 
was married to Jane McCuUough ; came to Hancock county in 
1837, and served as County Auditor in 1S55 ; also served as 
Justice of the Peace, and kept store at Mt. Comfort back in the 
forties. He was a Mason, and, above all, an honest man. He 
died June 17, i860. His wife died in 1876. Both are buried on 
Buck Creek, at the Hodge cemetery. 

William Smith came early to Buck Creek, and opened up 
a fine farm, where he lived many years, and became wealthy 
and well liked. He died in 1883. 

Captain James R. Bracken, an old-timer of Greenfield, 
was in the Mexican war in 1846. He organized a company in 
Hancock county and was a very popular man. 

Nathan Crawford came early to Greenfield and married a 
daughter of Jeremiah Meek, He was a contractor of note in his 
day. He built the court-house at Anderson in 1838 and the 
Greenfield court-house in 1852. He was County Treasurer in 
1831. He died in Greenfield in 1869. 

George Y. Atkinson, a prominent citizen of Hancock 
county many years, was elected County Clerk in 1856. He 
died July 25, 1869. 

John Vandyke, a prominent citizen of Brown township, 
was born about the year 1S25. He died a little past the merid- 
ian of life; buried at Harlan cemetery. He was a fine workman 
at smithing, at which he worked in Rushville, Indiana, in his 
best days. He was twice married. The first time to Miss 
Seward, daughter of Oba Seward; second time to Miss Sew- 
ard, daughter of James Seward. 

William Caldwell and wife, worthy pioneers of Vernon 
township, have resided there nearly fifty years, parents of 
Harry Caldwell, of McCordsville. Mr. and Mrs. William 
Caldwell will be remembered as worthy pioneers of Hancock 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 45 1 

county. They died back in the eighties ; buried at McCords- 
ville, Indiana. 

Dr. Paul Espy, an old-time physician of Palestine, came 
there as early as 1S40, and had all through his long practice 
there reasonable success as a doctor and business man, being 
quite wealthy when he died in 1SS4. He was a German by 
birth, and about seventy years of age when he died. 

Benjamin McNamee was for over fifty years a resident of 
Sugar-Creek township. He was born in Ohio in 1S27. His 
father, Daniel McNamee, came to Hancock county and entered 
land in an early day. Benjamin was married to Mary A. Irons 
in 1849. Children's names : Cottain, James W., Emma and 
Mollie. Mr. McN. died about the^year 1891. 

B. B. Clift, a prominent citizen of Hancock county for 
many years, resided in Jackson township from about the year 
1825. He was an active member of the Baptist Church (Mis- 
sionary). He died in 1S95; '^ buried at the Simmons cemetery 
near his old home. 

Dr. N. P. Howard, Sr., was for over thirty years one of 
Greenfield's best men and physicians. He was born in Ohio 
in 1822 and was educated at Brookville, Indiana. He came to 
Greenfield, Indiana, in 1843, and in 1844 was married to Cin- 
derella J. Gooding, daughter of Asa and Matilda Gooding. 
He was Assistant Surgeon of the Twelfth Indiana Regiment 
and a member of the order of I. O. O. F. He died in 1895 ' 
buried at Greenfield, Indiana. 

Among other prominent persons of the county we may 
mention Hamilton J. D unbar. Dr. Lot Edwards, Dr. Elam I. 
Judkins, Henry Swope, Judge J. W. Walker, William Sebas- 
tian, Mrs. James Tyner, Dr. J.J. Carter, Basil Meek, William 
Bracken, Dr. Barnard, Asa Gooding and wife, William Fries 
(Parson), George Mooth, Isaac Roberts and wife, A. C. Handy, 
George G. Tague, Morris Pierson, R. P. Brown, William J. 
Sparks, Joseph Baldwin, Samuel H. Dunbar, Nathan Hendren 
and William P. Smith. 

Just as we go to' press one of Greenfield's noble women 
has passed away. The large funeral procession and floral of- 
ferings gave evidence of her true worth and the high esteem 
in which she was held — wife of Qiiitman Jackson, County 



452 THE PIONEERS OF 

School Superintendent, who has the entire sympathy of the 
people of Hancock county. Below will be found an obituary 
notice at the time of her death: 

Adah M., daughter of Dr. Benjamin W. and Lydia W. 
Royer, was born in Noblesville, Indiana, July 26, 1861. On 
Februar}' 3^, 1S80, she was married to Qiiitman Jackson and 
died at her home in Greenfield at two o'clock p. m., January 
31, 1S96, at the age of thirty-four years, six months and five 
days. To them were born five children, all of whom are liv- 
ing, Bessie, aged fifteen, Carl, twelve, Jennie, nine, Grover, 
seven and Alma, three. 

In 187S, at the age of eleven years, she united with the M. 
E. Church at Fortville, Indiana. After removing from Fort- 
ville she received from the church at that place her letter, and 
in 1S91 she and her husband united with the Presbyterian 
Church in Greenfield, and she continued in that church rela- 
tion to the. time. of her death. She was also an esteemed 
member of the Order of the Eastern Star, and enjoyed the in- 
timate acquaintance of a large circle of friends in this and 
adjoining counties. 

As a neighbor, she was kind and thoughtful, and ever 
willing to do her part in relieving the suffering or in bestowing 
any needed assistance. Her sympathetic heart and generous 
disposition won for her the love and esteem of neighbors and 
friends. 

But it was in her home that the many lovable traits of 
character which she possessed were most fully exemplified. To 
her husband she was ever true, kind and loyal, and often 
spoke to her friends in highest praise of his kindness and de- 
votion to her. She was indeed his helpmate. Her diligence 
and cheerfulness, coupled with the genial nature of the hus- 
band, made their home the scene of many enjoyable gatherings 
of their neighbors and friends. Her presence on numerous 
journeys made for her husband real pleasure excursions, out of 
what would otherwise have been purely business trips in the 
performance of official duty. 

For her children she bore, in the most complete sense, a 
mother's love. Her life and energy were gladly spent in the 
promotion of their welfare and happiness. Every comfort and 



MADISON AND HANCOCK COUNTIES. 453 

enjoyment which could be brought to them by her wilHng 
hands was bestowed with pleasure. She felt the responsibility 
of their training, and in kindness, with a loving, christian 
spirit, watched over them and guided their youthful steps. 

In her busy, happy life she had not failed to make prepa- 
ration for the hereafter. During her last sickness she was 
patient and resigned, and remarked to her friends that all was 
well with her. She expressed a desire, to live that she might 
help her devoted husband and beloved children, but said if it 
was the Lord's will she was ready to go. She was conscious 
and composed to tlie last, and approached death's door as one 
would that of a friend's, fully realizing that the end was near. 
Her mind seemed to soar above the things of earth, and the 
expression of her countenance, as well as her words, told that 
she was happy. Thus while the body grew weaker, and with 
unlooked for rapidity gave up the struggle, her spirit in advance 
of dissolution seemed to have joined its kindred of the re- 
deemed, and brought into the sorrowing home the holy presence 
of the angels who had come to accompany her redeemed spirit 
into the realms of eternal glory. 

In such a life there is much worthy of emulation, and in 
such a death there is much to relieve the crushing sorrow that 
bears so heavily on the bereaved husband and children. While 
the light of the home has been darkened, and the cup of joy 
exchanged for that of sorrow, yet the noble life and pure spirit 
still exists, and beckons onward and upward to that blissful life 
beyond. 

The funeral services were held at the Presbyterian Church 
in Greenfield at two o'clock on Sunday, February 2d, Rev. E. 
W. Souders officiating. The Order of Eastern Star performed 
the beautiful burial ceremony of the order. A large and sym- 
pathizing audience of relatives and friends accompanied the 
remains to the last resting place in Park cemetery. 



Before closing the leaves of the Pioneer I want to 
thank those who during the past two or three years have 
contributed so much to make my labor light in the fore- 
going pages, and who liave waited so patiently for the 



« 
454 THE PIONEERS OF 

advent of the same. Sickness and other unavoidable hin- 
drances have long delayed the work, but as age adds to 
the worth of many things I trust it will prove so in this 
case. I also desire to be mindful of the information 
received from many sources, both private and public, and 
especiall}^ to the publishers of the County History, King 
& Binford, whose work I have found a valuable help. 
And now, dear reader, please don't prick a date or name 
which is wrong, but turn rather to some things well said. 
You will never know the toil and trouble one is at in ob- 
taining dates or names, or you would pass over in silence 
any little discrepancy that may occur in the Pioneer. 

S. HARDEN. 



INDEX. 



BIOGRAPHIES, 



Page. 

Anderson, James M Si 

Adams, Abraham iq4 

Allen, Harrison .203 

Addison, lion. John 2S1 

Addison, Milton 414 

Bowers, David 52 

Ballard, Thomas P 71 

Ball, William S9 

Behymer, Hon. Andrew J 154 

Be nefield, William 159 

Brunt Family. 170 

Brown, Aaron Warner iSi 

Bevin, Harry T 202 

Barton, William 210 

Booram, Allen.. 219 

Brandenherg Fomily 220 

Barrett, Edward H 282 

Babcock. Juda A 285 

Braddock, James R 286 

Barrett, Benton L 303 

Braddock Family 340 

Blake, Peter S .^66 

Brown, Adam i, 368 

Brandenburg:, Al.. 377 

Bills, Josephus 395 

Barnard, Kobert Y 413 

Bridg^es, Franklin A 420 

Bradley, Nelson 422 

Bradlev, Elizabeth 426 

Binford, John H 430 

Cook, Joel, M. D 55 

Cooper, Benjamin 66 

Cross, Absalom P 72 

Cox, Isaac U 122 

Cottrell, Abraham 124 

Cook, Dr. Ward 127 

Crossly, Conrad 147 

Cattron. David 148 

Cree, Hon. Robert H i6g 

Croan, Hon. David E 17? 

Coburn, John 192 

Cannad ay, Caleb 197 

Collier, Robert 206 

Chappell, Joshua 2o8 

Cox, Abiiah 228 

Crist, John 279 

Caudell, Elder David 287 

Collins, Ira M 29S 

Collins, Oliver A., M. D 301 

Collins, William 302 

Catt, Wesle^ S ..^05 

Collins, William, Sr 306 

Collins, Jesse F 315 

Collins, Robert 316 

Colyer, Wellington 318 



Page. 

Cook Family 323 

Cook, Benjamin H., M. D 327 

Caldwell, William G 333 

Clayton, Joseph 337 

Collins, J. O. G 353 

Cummins, John 363 

Cooper, Elijah S 364 

Cooper, Lewis ---S^S 

CuIp,John W 36^ 

Cooper, Dr. B. W 372 

Chandler, Senator Morgan 426 

Curry Family.. 428 

De laughter, l^evi.. 69 

De laughter, Jonathan 79 

Durham, Joseph 94 

Davis, John 136 

Draper, Joseph 151 

Dunn, \Villiam A 333 

Dunn. Willam H 335 

Downing, Charles 436 

Ellis, Wiley 70 

Etsler,John W 79 

Eckhart, Mrs. Nancy 95 

Eads,Birkett 133 

Elliott, Benjamin 291 

Furgason, Shadrach 78 

Furgason, Eli 90 

F'attic, John 107 

Finnemore, Joseph, Sr 190 

Forgey, John 276 

Fink, Andrew. 290 

Gooding, Lenox 67 

Gilmore, George 82 

Gisse, Adam gi 

Gale, William, S. Sr 106 

Gale, William, Jr 165 

Greenlee, Andrew T 167 

Grist, Aquilla 304 

Garrioti, William L 318 

Gipe, Henry H 321 

Green, John, Sr 350 

Gooding, Hon. David S 439 

Herritage, William E . 55 

Henn,C F 58 

Hickey, John 74 

Hosier, Peter 78 

Hudson, James 101 

Hancock, Joseph 109 

Hall, John 144 

Harmason, John. Sr 146 

Hodson, Judge Eli 17S 

Hundley, Hon James M 205 

Harmon, Moses D 209 

Hardin, Phillip 228 

Hunt, Drs. John and William 229 



456 



INDEX. 



Page. 

I lerr, K;isper_ 207 

Hays, William M 309 

Ileiiii, Rev. Jolin 330 

Huston. David 363 

Hanna, R. D.. M. D 3S1 

Harvey, Obediah O.. 277 

Ilenby, J. K. 420 

Insflis, Alexander 152 

Irish Family 223 

Irish, Samuel D 226 

Jarrett, James W _ 66 

Johnson, Hon. M. U... _ So 

Jones, William L SS 

Johns, William 9S 

Jones, Lemuel K 104 

Jones, Isaac W_ ii;3 

Jackson, Andrew 1S3 

Johnson, Joseph 21 S 

Johnson. James K.. 225 

Johns, Matthew ..289 

Jackson, John, Sr 314 

Johnson, F, M 317 

justice, Dr. William A ---321 

justice, John H., M. D .322 

Jackson, Stephen 329 

Johnson, H. C. 340 

Iackson,Tremillius N .433 

Jones, W. R 434 

Koehler, Jacob 85 

King-, William JM __ So 

Keltner, Sanford M _ 209 

Kennedy, J. Crouch 3SS 

Kuhn, Elder T. H 432 

Lanjjley, Curtis _ ---130 

Lewis, Ulysses A 224 

I^akey, Joseph R -300 

Lynam, Joshua 352 

Lee, Daniel .S6z 

Lacey, Jordan 370 

Larrimore, James M., M.D 413 

Maynard, Barnibus, Sr 57 

McClead, Charles A 63 

Markle,John D 69 

Miller, Ira F S7 

McCarty, Rev. I. V 90 

McAllister, John loj 

McAllister, Thomas. 113 

Makepeace, Esta M _. 116 

Moore, Aquilla 121 

Maddron, Mathias 157 

Moore P'amily 1S5 

Metcalf, Tim'othy 194 

Mershon, Judge William H 202 

McDaniel, Levi ,101 

Makepeace Family __ 212 

McAllister, Garrett, Sr 229 

Myers Family 231 

McAllister Family 233 

MilDourn, William A _ .293 

Murphy, John P. _ 310 

Manning, Joel 311 

McCord, Elias 311 

Meek F"amily 342 

Masters, Milton D --.364 

Mingle Family 373 

Mints Bros . 374 

McCrillus, Dr. S. B 376 

McCord, T- Parks 386 

Mitchell, "William, Sr .410 

Neese, Reuben 88 

Norris, Stephen iA-- -- 'S3 

Norris, Aquilla 1.. 175 

Osborn, Isaac P. 62 

Oftutt, Judge Charles G ''../" 390 



P.\GE. 

Prather, William 78 

Peck, Jesse... 73 

Peck, Alexander M 77 

Pettigrew, Washington 95 

Poindexter, Josephus 131 

Pittsford, David 138 

Paris Familv 164 

Pioneers of Hancock Counlv .265 

Potts, Alfred ' 294 

Potts, William 341 

Pauley, William H .416 

Parker, George W 2S5 

Pratt, Dr. Charles C 377 

Q,uinlin, John 36S 

Richwine, Noah 64 

Robinett, George ^2 

Rains, Ahasnel _ 113 

Rider, Joseph H .. 137 

Rector, Thornton 14S 

Reeves, Charles R 180 

Ruddell, Milton. 187 

Richardson, JohnG 188 

Riggs, E. M 378 

Summers, Lewis S 65 

Stanley, Daniel J33 

Smith, Henry 139 

Swain, Prof. Joseph 140 

Surber Family 168 

Simmons, Allen 176 

Smith, Seth 179 

Saunders, William _ 180 

Stanley, William _ 182 

Shawver, James 196 

Shannon, Joseph. 207 

Shadows on the Wall 264 

Service, John G 276 

Steele, lia 276 

Smith, Abner. .,278 

Scott, Edward P 294 

Scotton, William W 332 

Seward Family. ._ _ -3^5 

Scott, George 389 

Sanford, Francis M 392 

Shelby, Joshua 394 

Titus, John 218 

Thomas James, Sr.. ._ 344 

Thomas, David, and Family 348 

Troy, Samuel A., M. D 269 

Titus, Charles, M. D 382 

Vermillion, Jesse 56 

Vermillion, Chauncey 61 

Vermillion Uriah C 93 

Vernon, Edward j43 

VanWinkle, Qiiincy :.. 161 

Vandyke Brothers. -.204 

Varner, John 380 

Webster, Robert W S4 

Wood, Alexander S •.. 65 

Whitehead, Thomas 87 

Waggy, Henry 9^ 

Waymier, Noah 117 

Williams, Aaron. 120 

Williams, Samuel F 123 

Westerfleld, Dr. John W 189 

Windsor, Daniel 199 

White, Hon. John H 291 

White, Hon. John Q .292 

Wilson, Benjamin F 295 

White, John W _. 313 

Watts, William, and Family 351 

Williams, Thomas 361 

Walker, Seth --.366 

Walker Rev. Miles 384 

Wales, John W 3S9 



INDEX. 



457 



Page. 

Walker, George 432 

Williams, Wesley ..2(iS 

Wright, Joseph .270 

Wilson, Henry I?.. 273 



Page. 

Young, Nathan F < 85 

Yetter, Andrew F 30S 

Zedaker, John M ^ 115 



ILLUSTRATIONS. 



Page. 

Addison, Hon. John 312 

Branch, Charles" N., M. D 5T 

Ballard, George JSI 92 

Barnard, William C 360 

Boring, Lawrence, 879 

Bradley. Nelson 41S 

Bradley, Elizabeth 419 

Cook, Ward, M. D ._.. 15 

Cabin House of John Surber.. iS 

Chipman, Judge M. A 92 

Craven, Judge Hervey 126 

Court-house, Hancock County ...2156 

Collins, Thomas 356 

Collins, Dr. O. A 411 

Curry, Capt. I. A 429 

Christian Church, Greenfield .444 

Curry, Capt. I. A.. 429 

Dun lap, Hon. M. M 76 

Doxey, Maj. Charles T ...222 

Downing, Charles -437 

Ellison, Judge Alfred 142 

Folkner, Hon. John L 142 

Fort, Joseph 395 

Grist, Aquilla _ 375 

Gooding, Hon. David S -3S3 

Gooding, Mrs, Matilda 899 

Harmon, Moses D 134 

Henry, Maj. Samuel 191 

Henry, Hon. Charles I 84 

Ham, Hon. George W 371 

Harden, Samuel, frontispiece, jind 3^7 

High School Building, Greenfield 828 

Herr, Kasper 403 

Johns, Mrs. William 2S0 



Page. 

Johns, William 280 

Johnson, Hon. M. U 150 

Justice, John J _. 158 

Jackson, Andrew 280 

Jackson, Mrs. Andrew 280 

"Kittinger, William A 92 

Makepeace, Esta A 92 

Metcalf, Timothy 118 

Masonic Temple,' Greenfield 354 

Marsh, Ephraim 407 

Oft'utt, Judge Charles G 871 

Old Swimin' Hole, near Greenfield 320 

Pauley, William H 379 

Parker, George W 421 

Ryan, H. C 142 

Reeves, Hon. Benjamin F 391 

Sloan, William 59 

Simmons, Allen no 

Simmons, Mrs. Allen no 

Starr, John.. 166 

Terhune, Hon. John H 68 

Thompson, H. D... _ 142 

Tyner, Elijah _ _ -347 

Thomas, William M __ 37S 

Thomas, James 379 

Weeks, Joseph, M. D 41 

Wood, David W 92 

Westerfield,John W.,:M D 103 

Westerfield, Mary E._. 102 

Whelock, George _ 142 

Williams, Wesley 263 

Warrum, Hon. Noble 339 

White, Hon. John Q. _ 37' 

Wilson, Benjamin F 375 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



Page. 

Adams Township Pioneers 19 

Anderson Township Pioneers 25 

Boone Township Pioneers 25 

Communication from Dr. Suman 244 

Duck-Creek Township Pioneers 27 

Early Recollections of Pendleton 236 

Fall-Creek Township Pioneers 2S 

Green To\vnship Pioneers 32 

Gone But Not Forgotten 445 

History Masonic Lodge, Greenfield 394 

Jackson Township Pioneers 34 

Lafayette Township Pioneers 36 



Letter from James Hoi lings worth 249 

Letter from W. H. Watts 356 

Letter from J. W. Green 3s7 

Monroe Township Pioneers 38 

Our Lamented Dead 252 

Old Settlers' Meetings S 

Pipe-Creek Township Pioneers 40 

Richland Township Pioneers 45 

Stony-Creek Township Pioneers 43 

Shadows on the Wall... 263 

Union Township Pioneers 47 

VanBuren Township Pioneers 48 



JAMES SHOWVER. CHARLES SHOWVER. 

SHOWVER & SON, 



MAIN STREET DEALERS IN 



BEST LIQUORS 

Billiard Parlop and Laneh Goanter. 

Call on the Old Veteran at 38 North Main St., 

ANDERSON, - INDIANA. 

YOU GET— ^ 

- — THE BEST 

When You Call for 

-^JUNG+BEER.^ 

HARRY BE VAN, Agent, 
ANDERSON, IlSriD. 




>M^CR1LLUS^< 




Address Dr. S. B. McCrillus, Anderson, Ind. 



^i|The Acknowledged Excelsior 
""" System Eenovator. 




5 o >Jt Cures Bronchitis, Palpitation of the Heart) 
£ I 5 Laryngitis, Sore Throat, Phthisic, Weak Breast, 
^ S p Coughs and Colds- Female Complaints, Liver 
— *lz. Complaints, Dyspepsia. Chronic Rheumatism Etc, 









-= Address, OR. S. B. McCRIUUS. Anderson, Ind. 5. 



Sold by Druggists and Dealers Generally. 



W/n. I. GARRIOTL 



DEALER IN 



DRY GOODS, GROCERIES, 

AND GENERAL MERCHANDISE, 

WARRINGTON, IND. 



This large and well regulated house is so well 
known, that to mention it is only to give a 
well established fact, that it is second to none 
in Madison or Hancock counties. You can 
not call for anything but what I have or can 
get in twenty-four hours. My stock is com- 
plete, embracing dry goods, groceries, 

BOO'TJS, •• JSMOE^JS, 

HARDWARE, TINWARE, 

GLHSS, NMILS, SHLT, 

In fact, everything, and 1 will sell at prices 
that will make the pioneers glad that they 
live in the gas belt, and that Will Garriott 
was born about the time the war closed. 1 
never follow, but always lead. Give me a 
call and go away smiling. 

FRANK GARRIOTT, W. I. GARRIOTT, 

Salesman. Proprietor. 



C. B. KEESLI/NG'S 



fl 






^ rv 



STATE STREET, 



PENDLETON, INDIANA. 



I take great pleasure in announcing to 
the pioneers and others that I am to the 
front with one of the largest assortments of 
furniture ever brought to Pe';ndleton, em- 
bracing all the new varieties and latest de- 
signs, which I will sell on the most liberal 
terms. My motto is the best for the least 
money. I keep two hearses, and will attend 
all calls on funeral occasions. Embalming 
done, and a lady in attendance if required. 

Call and be convinced, 



<J. ]B. KIEEHLTTVO. 



REEVES, 



* • 







1 II V/ I 



nr 





AINTDERSOIT, IND. 



Can be found up-stairs on the west side of the 
square. Don't fail to give him a call. All work up to 
date, and warranted to give entire satisfaction. En- 
larging and framing of all kinds of portraits given 
special attention. Delay not, but come at once, and 
secure the shadow ere the substance fadeth away. 

-sC. R. REEVES,8- 

WEST SIDE OF SQUARE, 



ANDERSON, INDIANA. 




Have You Used 
the 



It is Curing 

Everybody, 

And it Will 

Cure You. 

Read what the 

President 

Has to Say 

About It. 



Office OF THE Irish Tea Co., ) 
College Green, Dublin, Ireland, j 
^uigley Medicine Co., Greenfield, Ind.: 

Gentlemen: In ma ^ing you the American agents for the exclusive sale of IRISH 
HERB TEA, I will comply with your request to give a short history of its discovery. 

After completing my travelsaround the world and settling down in my old home, 
to resume the practice of my beloved profession, I was surprised to notice the fairness 
of the complexion of our dames and misses compared with other nationalities, and 
bothered my head to ascertain the reason. 

After diligent inquiry and the judicious distribution of a few shillings, I ascertained 
that the rural lasses gathered a peculiar herb, growing in a small district along the 
Irish Coast. The herb is gathered in the month of October and parked in packages and 
sold in the larger cities. A tea is made of these dried herbs with the result of beauti- 
fyin" the complexion by purifvin-^ the blood. 

The source of this herb has been zealo\isly euarded by the inhabitants of the dis- 
trict and to this day hut few know of its cultivation. 

While traveling in Peru and Bolivia, I noticed that the South Ameiican Indians 
consumed large quantities of Erythroxylon Cocoa, and that no people on the face of the 
earth endure such trying fatigue as these people in crossing the Peruvian Andes. 

Nervous prostration, sii k headache and physical languor are unknown to these peo- 
ple, as all of its inhabitants partake freelv of this most excellent herb. 

In America, between Cnnada and Virginia, grows a weed possessing great curative 
powers, known as Gravel Root. It has a peculiar action on the kidneys and bladder, 
and in some parts is used for all diseases of these organs, and the most wonderful cures 
of disease of the kidneyshas been made by its use. Those who use it occasionally have 
never been known to suffer from kidney or bladder diseases. 

The Germans are proverbial for their good digestion and constipation is almost an 
unknown complaint among them. The reason is thev habitually use a tea made of pure 
Alexandria Senna and Ruchu leaves. The Irish herb gives to our dames and lasses 
their fair looks because it purifies the blood. The South American Indian endures great 
fatigue and is free from nervous prostration and sick headache because he uses Ery- 
throxvlon Cocoa. 

The American rural population are free from kidney and bladder diseases because 
they use Gravel Root Tea. 

The Germans aie free from constipation and indigestion, because of their universal 
use of Senna and Buchu Tea. 



Price 25 Cents. For sale by all Druggists. 



DANIEL M ALONE, M, D., 
President Irish Tea Company, 
College Green, Dublin, Ireland. 



R. L. LEESON'S 




H-SME 



ELWOOD, l/NDIAINA. 



This house is every ^A7■here acknowledged 
to be the largest in the country. It is to the 
front in 1896 with an endless variety o' the 
choicest goods ever brought to the city of 
Elwood, which I w^ill sell at prices that defy 
competition. M3" house, three stories, is 
filled from top to bottom with the most de- 
sirable goods. I employ sixty clerks, who 
will wait on you when you call. My annual 
sales amount to three hundred thousand 
dollars. As I buy by the car load I am en- 
abled to sell at low figures. Call and be 
assured of the above facts. 

ELWOOD, . INDIANA. 



Greeting to Old Settlers! 



You are Invited to Visit the Most 
Completely Equipped 




I 




B 




In the Gas Belt. The best assorted stock of 

FURNITURE, 

CARPETS, STOVES, 

Queensware, Window Shades, 

Lace Curtains, Curtain Poles and Fixtures, 

Pictures and Picture Frames, etc. Prices 

Always the Lowest. Quality of 

Goods the Highest. 

RITCHIE <& STEIN, 



Anderson Hotel Block, 



ANDERSON, INDIANA. 



HIGjIOIi, fllflKEPEflGE & CO., 



DEALERS IN 



HARDWARE, STOVES, 



gr^jvtje:^, 



MANTELi * WINDOW * CLMi 



PAINTS, 



OILS, VARNISMES, 



BRUSHES, ETC., 



ANDERSON, = INDIANA. 




Don't You 

^ Forget It! 

When in need of Foot Wear, we 
Carry the best line of Boots and 
Shoes in Anderson for the money. 

JOE rade:i_v, 

68 and 70 North Main Street, Under Doxey Hotel, 

ANDERSON, - IND. 



REUBEN NEE6E, 



DEALER IN 



General * Merchandise, 



PERKINSVILLE, INDIANA. 



I wish to inform tlie people of Madison and 
Hamilton counties that 1 have one of the best assort- 
ments of goods ever brought to this market. 

DRY GOODS, GROCERIES. 

HARDW^ARE. CUTLERY, 

TINW^ARE, BOOTS, SHOES, 

WALL PAPER, STATIONERY, 

SALT, GLASS, BRUSHES. 

SPADES, SHOVELS, RAKES, 

in fact, everything you could mention. 1 am more 
than ever determined not to be undersold. My motto 
is the best for the least money. Call and be convinced. 
At the oldBeckwith stand, Perkinsville, Ind. 
j|@"Thanks for former patronage. 



JOHHSON, GATES & GANAOAY, 



THE LEADi/\C 



r 



ilTORE BEILERS 



9 1-2, 12, H and 15 N. Meridian St., 



ANDERSON, = INDIANA. 



We want everybody to come to our mammoth 
stores and inspect our stock. We are here to supply 
your wants at the lowest possible cost. No trouble 
for us to show our goods. We are positive that we 
can save you money on every purchase. 

Goods sold for cash or on easy payments. 

JOHfJSOfl, GATES & CflHflDAV. 



M. L. JORDAN, 

PENDLETON, INDIANA, 

H^rdwaire, Stoves^ 

Cutlery eirjcl Tipwaire. 
0^5 Fixtures, 

Hupterj' Supplies. 

Call, and you'll find Jordan an easy road to travel. 
At the Old Silver Corner, 

PENDLETON, INDIANA. 



Harry is to the front in the display of the 

Finest Dry Goods 

IN THE COUNTY. 
Call and be Convinced of the Fact 



THE GRIMES COMPANY, 



83 NORTH MERIDIAN ST., 



One Door South of Old Grimes Corner, 



ANDERSON, 



INDIANA. 



Will Open September i the 




I 



ll 




■ 



IN T^HR GIT^Y. 



NEW STORE, 



IVEW ROOI>4, 



NEW PRICES. NEW EVERYTHING. 



OAL-U ON ''BOB." 



THE* FAIR. 

ANDERSON'S 

New Dry Goods House 

WANTS TO SEE YOU. 



Our Dry Goods and Basement Stock 
will save you more money than any other 
place in our great Hoosier State Don't fail 
to come and see us 

Yours for low prices, 

R. r. /V\ALOTT & CO., 

53 Meridian Street, 

ANDERSON, INDIANA. 



HENRY JOHNSON, 



DEALER IN 





E 



^VILLOW BRANCH, INDIANA. 



Takes this method of informing the people gen- 
erally that he is to the front with a general variety of 

DRY GOODS, GROCERIES, 



BOOTS AND SHOES, 

In fact, everything kept in a general store, which he 
will sell at ruinously low rates. 

I will not be undersold, and will pay cash or take 
in exchange all kinds of country produce, for which I 
will pay the highest market price. I never follow, but 
always lead. Don't fail to give me a call. 

HENRY JOHNSON. 




RUrE WILLIAMS, 



THE 



PIONEER SHOE MK 



CDF 



ANDERSON, - INDIANA. 



Makes a specialty of old people's foot wear. 
Carries the largest stock and sells the best goods for 
the least money. Come in and see me. West Side 
Square. 



T. N. JACKSON, 



Qeneral Dealer in 



DRY GOODS, GROCERIES, 

Hardware, Tinware, Boots and Shoes, 



In fact, everything usuallj^ found in a 
■well regulated store. I will not be under- 
sold, Call and be convinced Cash or goods 
in exchange for all countrj? produce, for 
which I will pay the highest market price. 
T. N. JACKSON, Maxwell, Ind. 



THE DRUGGIST, 

MAXWELL, INDIANA. 



"Wishes to inform the readers of the 
"Pioneer" that he is to the front w^ith a ^A^ell 
stocked drug store, where you will ind 
fancy articles, books, stationery clocks, 
toilet articles, paints, oils, varnishes, brushes, 
in fact, everything usually kept in a first- 
class drug store. Best quality of liquor for 
medical purposes Prescriptions carefully 
compounded day or night. Call and see me. 

AIKINS, The Druggist. 



S. F. HARDY. CHARLES N. HARDY. 

5. F. HARDY & SON, 

MARKLEVILLE, INDIANA. 



Everything kept in this Mammoth House, 
such as 



DRY GOODS, 

Boots and Shoes, 

Hardware, * Tinware, 

FARn IMPLEMENTS, 

Bu§:§:ies and Clothing 

By the Million. 
Call and see Sol and Charley, 



JOHIV 'THOI^I^E^, 



DEALER IN 



11 MS. ooe[i 



And General Merchandise, 



WARRINGTON, INDIANA. 



U V/ J 



Announces through the "Pioneer" to the people 
of Madison and Hancock counties that he is perma- 
nently located at Warrington, Ind., where he will keep 
a well regulated stock of goods, consisting of 

Dry Goods, Groceries, 

Clothing', Boots, Slioes, 

Hardware, Nails, Glass, Salt, 

In fact, everything usually kept in a general store, 
all of which he will sell at prices that will astonish the 
natives. The hungry fed day or night on the best the 
land atfords. Come and bring your friends and 
neighbors, and go away happy. 



S. AAARKT & SON, 



LEADING 



r 



[INITIE DEI 



.1 




AND 



UNDERTAKERS, 




lo and 12 West Eighth Street, 



Telephones 96 and 190, 



ANDERSON, INDIANA. 



JOHN H. ncAVILLAN, 



DEAi-ER in 



Hiiroess, Miks, Coll^r^, 

BLANKETS, WHIP5, 

ROBES + AND + HORSE + GOODS, 

94 NORTH r^filH STREET, 

JLNIDERSOlSr, IND, 

WILLIAM LEE, 

THE VETERAN 

HARNESS MAKER, 

ELWOOD, - INDIANA. 



Keeps constantly on hand Harness, Saddles, Col- 
lars, Whips, Brushes, Etc. 

Repairing of all kinds done on short notice. 
Don't fail to see him before purchasing. 



Bicycles and Cycling Supplies. 

Fine\Repairing. Bicycles Made to Order. 




^'f'c^r-—^ 



ESTABLISHED, 1889. 



CARPENTER'5 CYCLE EXCHANGE. 

We are sole agents for the Stearns, Winton, Hoflf- 
man, Halladay, Smalley, Imperial, Crescent, Chief 
Anderson, Duke, Ben Hur, Harvard, &c. Full line of 
bicycle suits, caps and legg^ings. All kinds of repair- 
ing. Renting a specialty. Bicycles sold on easy pay- 
ments. When in the city call and see us. All goods 
warranted. 

CARPENTER'S CYCLE EXCHANGE, 

SOUTH SIDE OF SQUARE, 

ANDERSON, - IND. 



C. A. CARPENTER, 



■■TilL-mLEfl 



SOUTH MERIDIA/N STREET. 



ANDER50N, = INDIANA. 



If you vvant a inonuinent, don't fail to 
give me a call I keep all kinds, such as 
Scotch Granite, Domestic Granite, Tennessee 
Marble, Italian Marble, Gray Granite, in fact, 
all kinds, and at the very lowest possible 
prices. Drop in and see me 

CD. A. c^AF=RF=^E:rM"rE:FR. 



-§D M MOROINEY & CO ,§- 



DEALERS IN 



Varnishes, Perfumes, Toilet Articles, 

DRY GOODS GROCERIES 

Hardware, Tinware, Clocks, 

Jewelry in Endless Variety! 

WINDOW BLINDS, ETC., 

W^ARRINGTON, INDIANA. 



We greet the old and young with a grand display 
of goods. We are more than ever determined to keep 
to the front, and will not be undersold, here or else- 
where. Our motto is the best for the least money. 
No trouble to show goods. So come along, bring the 
babies, old folks and big girls, and tell for a week the 
beauties you saw at Moroney's. 



H. C. JOHNSON, 



DEALER IN 



GENERAL MERCHANDISE, 

WILKINSON, INDIANA. 



All kinds of Dry Goods, Groceries, Hardware, 
Cutlery, Boots, Shoes, Tinware, Salt, Glass, in fact, 
everything, kept constantly on hand, and will be sold 
at the lowest possible prices. My motto is the best 
goods for the least money. All kinds of country pro- 
duce taken in exchange for goods. No trouble to 
show goods. Call at the White Front. 

/V\/\Y & JULIAN, 

Hardware * Dealers, 

WILKINSON, INDIANA. 



This well known firm takes this method to say 
to the people of Hancock, Henry and Madison coun- 
ties that they have on hand one of the best assort- 
ments of hardware ever brought to this market, em- 
bracing stoves, tinware, cutlery in endless variety, 
harrows, drills, plows, binders, cradles, rakes, etc. 
Don't fail to give us a call, and see one of the best 
hardware stores in the three counties. 



BREWSTER & TMOA\AS, 

THE 0. K. DRUGGISTS. 

FORTVILLE, INDIANA. 



This well known firm is to the front as usual with 
one of the best assortments of drugs ever brought to 
this market. We keep in stock pure drugs and chem- 
icals, paints, oils, brushes, wall paper, toilet articles, 
fancy stationery, in fact, all articles usually kept in a 
well regulated drug store. Our motto: "We never 
follow, but always lead." Thanks for former patron- 
age, and ask a continuance of the same. Prescriptions 
compounded day or night. Give us a call. 

JOHN SMAIL, 

THE BOOT AND SHOE MAN, 

FORTVILLE, INDIANA. 



Proprietor of the Mammoth Shoe Store desires to 
inform the readers of the "Pioneer" that he keeps one 
of the best assortments of boots and shoes in the three 
counties. By fair dealing he hopes to keep the large 
patronage heretofore given him. No trouble to show 
goods. Call and see him and get prices. 



HODSON & BROTHER, 



DEALERS IN 



MARN 




Announce through the "Pioneer" that they 

have permanently located in Anderson, 

where they will keep constantly on 

hand all kinds of 

Harness, Saddles, 

Collars, Whips, 

Fly Nets, Turf Goods, 

Blankets, Robes. 

Collar Pads, 

And many other articles in our line, which we will 
sell on the most reasonable terms. Call and see 
us. All kinds of repairing done on short notice. 

noi3{SiOiv «& :bi«o., 

WEST EIGHTH STREET, 



PR9THER 6 SOU, 



DEALERS in 




BOOTS AND 5HOES 



PHOENIX BLOCK, 



ANDERSON, INDIANA 



We keep nothing: but the very best 
makes of Boots an€l Shoes. Every 
pair warranted as represented. Don't 
fail to see us when in need of any 
kind of footwear. 

PRATHER & SON. 



CITY 



DRUG STORE 

Northeast of Public Square, 

ANDERSON, INDIANA. 

SPRNN & HUGHEIili, Proprietors. 



Announce to the people that we are more than ever 
determined to keep one of the best drug stores in 
the country, and to 

Sell at Low Figures! 

Our stock in part consists of Oils, Toilet Articles, 
Soaps, Brushes, Perfumery, Stationery, Combs, 
Books, Patent Medicines of all kinds, Liquors and 
Wines for medical purposes, Cigars, etc. Pre- 
scriptions carefully compounded by an experienced 
druggist. Call and see us. 

.SPANN & HUGHELL. 



BINQ'5 



0. p. C. H„ 



PMOE/\l\ BLOCK, 



ANDERSON, INDIANA 



HEADQUARTERS 



FOR BARGAINS! 



Give me a Call. I Will Not be Undersold. 



BING, TME CLOTMIER.